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Topic: Eugene Paul Wigner


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In the News (Thu 20 Jun 19)

  
  Eugene Paul Wigner, November 17, 1902 — January 1, 1995 | By Frederick Seitz, Erich Vogt, and Alvin M. Weinberg | ...
Wigner formed a close friendship with von Neumann that was to endure throughout their lifetimes.
While Wigner was strongly attracted to the field of physics, his father, who was of a very practical mind, insisted that instead he attend the Technische Hochschule in Berlin and focus on chemical engineering, so that he might be in a better position to earn a living in Hungary.
Immediately after the discovery of the neutron in 1932, Wigner studied the early measurements of neutron-proton scattering, the properties of the deuteron, the connection between the saturation property of nuclear binding energies and the short range nature of the inter-nucleon force, and the symmetry properties of the force.
www.nap.edu /html/biomems/ewigner.html   (6117 words)

  
  Eugene Wigner - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Eugene Paul Wigner (Hungarian Wigner Pál Jenő) (November 17, 1902 January 1, 1995) was a Hungarian physicist and mathematician who received the Nobel Prize in Physics in 1963 "for his contributions to the theory of the atomic nucleus and the elementary particles, particularly through the discovery and application of fundamental symmetry principles".
Wigner was one of a group of renowned Jewish-Hungarian scientists and mathematicians from turn-of-the-century Budapest, including Paul Erdős, Edward Teller, John von Neumann, and Leó Szilárd.
Wigner's friend paradox is a thought experiment proposed by Wigner, and may be seen as an extension of the Schrödinger's cat thought experiment.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Eugene_Paul_Wigner   (1652 words)

  
 Wigner, Eugene Paul   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-09-18)
Wigner studied chemical engineering and received his Ph.D. from the Institute of Technology in Berlin in 1925.
At Göttingen, Wigner formulated his law of the conservation of parity, which implies that it is impossible to distinguish left from right in fundamental physical interactions.
Wigner also conducted research on quantum mechanics, the theory of the rates of chemical reactions, and nuclear structure.
www.britannica.com /nobel/micro/639_49.html   (366 words)

  
 EUGENE WIGNER FACTS AND INFORMATION   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-09-18)
Eugene Paul Wigner (Hungarian Wigner Pál JenÅ‘) (November_17, 1902 – January_1, 1995) was a Hungarian physicist and mathematician who received the Nobel_Prize_in_Physics in 1963 "for his contributions to the theory of the atomic nucleus and the elementary particles, particularly through the discovery and application of fundamental symmetry principles".
Wigner was one of a group of renowned Jewish-Hungarian scientists and mathematicians from turn-of-the-century Budapest, including Paul_Erdős, Edward_Teller, John_von_Neumann, and Leó_Szilárd.
Von Neumann was a schoolmate and mentor, whom Wigner later described as "the brightest man I have ever known on this Earth." Wigner was the only one of the four to win a Nobel_Prize.
www.gottaorderflowers.com /Eugene_Wigner   (1573 words)

  
 Physics Today October 2002
Wigner and Szilard, whose European-Hungarian background taught them what happens when a country is run by dictators such as Adolf Hitler, became obsessed in their desire to push forward the development of the atomic bomb.
Wigner realized that humanity was in a struggle with the forces of evil, and that whoever made the bomb first would rule the world.
But Wigner had so much confidence in the accuracy of his calculations (backed, of course, by Fermi's experiments) that he insisted that, though the presence of water in the reactor would reduce the multiplication factor by perhaps 3%, enough reactivity would be left to make a reactor of modest size.
www.physicstoday.org /vol-55/iss-10/p42.html   (3156 words)

  
 Eugene Wigner -- Facts, Info, and Encyclopedia article   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-09-18)
Eugene Paul Wigner ((A native or inhabitant of Hungary) Hungarian Wigner Pál Jenő) (November 17, 1902 – January 1, 1995) was a (A native or inhabitant of Hungary) Hungarian (A scientist trained in physics) physicist and (A person skilled in mathematics) mathematician.
Von Neumann was a schoolmate and mentor, whom Wigner later described as "the brightest man I have ever known on this Earth." Wigner was the only one of the four to win a (An annual award for outstanding contributions to chemistry or physics or physiology and medicine or literature or economics or peace) Nobel Prize.
Though a professed political amateur, in 1939 and 1940, Dr. Wigner played a major role in agitating for a (A former United States executive agency that was responsible for developing atomic bombs during World War II) Manhattan Project, which built the atomic bomb to defend the world against Hitler.
www.absoluteastronomy.com /encyclopedia/e/eu/eugene_wigner.htm   (1655 words)

  
 TU Berlin - The shoulders on which we stand - Festschrift zur 125-Jahr-Feier der TU Berlin
Jenö Pál (Eugene Paul) Wigner was born in Budapest, Hungary on 17 November 1902.
With the rise to power of the Nazis in Germany during the 1930s, Wigner's position at the TH Berlin was taken from him on the grounds that he was Jewish.
Wigner received numerous prizes and honours during his career, the most important among them being the Nobel Prize for Physics in 1963.
www.tu-berlin.de /presse/125jahre/festschrift/wigner_e.htm   (546 words)

  
 Eugene Paul Wigner   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-09-18)
Wigner studied chemical engineering and received his Ph.D. from the Institute of Technology in Berlin in 1925.
At Gottingen, Wigner formulated his law of the conservation of parity, which implies that it is impossible to distinguish left from right in fundamental physical interactions.
Wigner also conducted research on quantum mechanics, the theory of the rates of chemical reactions, and nuclear structure.
physics.nobel.brainparad.com /eugene_paul_wigner.html   (392 words)

  
 Eugene Wigner | Biography | atomicarchive.com
Eugene Paul Wigner was born n Budapest, Hungary, on November 17, 1902.
Sadly, she died in 1937, the same year Wigner became a naturalized citizen of the U.S. Princeton invited Wigner back based on his reputation as a superb young physicist, and he accepted, rejoining the Princeton faculty in the fall of 1938.
With the discovery of fission, Wigner began working with Enrico Fermi on the problem of determining whether a fission-induced chain reaction was possible.
www.atomicarchive.com /Bios/Wigner.shtml   (466 words)

  
 ipedia.com: Eugene Wigner Article   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-09-18)
Eugene Paul Wigner was a Hungarian - American physicist and mathematician.
Eugene Paul Wigner (Hungarian Wigner Pál Jenő) (November 17, 1902 – January 1, 1995) was a Hungarian-American physicist and mathematician.
Wigner was one of a group of renowned Jewish-Hungarian scientists and mathematicians from turn-of-the-century Budapest, including Paul Erdos, Edward Teller, John von Neumann, and Leó Szilárd.
www.ipedia.com /eugene_wigner.html   (1520 words)

  
 Eugene P. Wigner, mathematical physicist   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-09-18)
I met Wigner quite often when I was instructor in physics at Princeton University, for the academic year 1960-1961, and again when I was working with Wightman on our book, from Sept 1962 to Feb 1963.
Wigner was an extremely polite man, and never preceded anyone in passing through a door.
Wigner put the subject of relativistic quantum mechanics on a firm footing, when he showed that the relativistic wave equations of Klein and Gordon, and of Dirac, and
www.mth.kcl.ac.uk /~streater/wigner.html   (334 words)

  
 Eugene Paul Wigner --  Encyclopædia Britannica
Born in Budapest, Hungary, Wigner came to the United States in 1930 and became a United States citizen in 1937.
The leading French painter of the postimpressionist period, Paul Gauguin was at his best when he could paint what he called “natural” men and women living with their fears, faiths, myths, and primitive passions.
Paul Gaugin briefly joined van Gogh in the town of Arles, but left after the artist cut off part of his own ear.
www.britannica.com /eb/article-9076954?tocId=9076954   (737 words)

  
 Eugene Paul Wigner, November 17, 1902 — January 1, 1995 | By Frederick Seitz, Erich Vogt, and Alvin M. Weinberg | ...
With the tools of group theory, Wigner derived many rules concerning atomic spectra that follow from the existence of rotational symmetry.
Immediately after the discovery of the neutron in 1932, Wigner studied the early measurements of neutron-proton scattering, the properties of the deuteron, the connection between the saturation property of nuclear binding energies and the short range nature of the inter-nucleon force, and the symmetry properties of the force.
In summary, Wigner laid the foundations for the application of symmetry principles to quantum mechanics, an achievement for which he earned the Nobel Prize.
bob.nap.edu /html/biomems/ewigner.html   (6117 words)

  
 Eugene Paul Wigner Papers
Civil Defense: article by Arthur A. Broyles and Eugene P.
Kallai, Ida Wigner, and Klein, Ilona WIgner (relatives to Eugene Wigner): 1957-1959
Szanton, Andrew: transcripts of interview with Eugene Wigner: 1987
libweb.princeton.edu /libraries/firestone/rbsc/aids/wigner.html   (1575 words)

  
 Wigner   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-09-18)
The 8th Wigner Symposium was held in New York on May 27 -- May 31 (2003).
Eugene Wigner was born in Hungary in 1902.
There was the Wigner Centennial Conference in Hungary in July of 2002.
www.physics.umd.edu /robot/wigner/wcalen.html   (100 words)

  
 Eugene Paul Wigner Biography / Biography of Eugene Paul Wigner Main Biography   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-09-18)
The Hungarian-born American physicist Eugene Paul Wigner (1902-1995) formulated symmetry principles and, together with group theory, applied them in atomic, nuclear, and elementary particle physics.
On November 17, 1902, Eugene P. Wigner was born in Budapest, the son of Anthony Wigner, a leather manufacturer, and Elisabeth Einhorn Wigner.
Wigner's doctoral thesis was on the formation and disintegration of molecules.
www.bookrags.com /biography-eugene-paul-wigner   (256 words)

  
 Wigner, Eugene (Paul)   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-09-18)
The Wigner effect is a rapid rise in temperature in a nuclear reactor pile when, under particle bombardment, such materials as graphite deform, swell, then suddenly release large amounts of energy.
This was the cause of the fire at the British Windscale plant 1957.
Educated at the Lutheran Gymnasium in Budapest, Wigner took up postgraduate studies in Berlin where he was present at Albert Einstein's seminars in the 1920s.
www.cartage.org.lb /en/themes/Biographies/MainBiographies/W/Wigner/1.html   (184 words)

  
 MSN Encarta - Search Results - Wigner Eugene Paul   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-09-18)
MSN Encarta - Search Results - Wigner Eugene Paul
Wigner, Eugene Paul (1902-1995), American physicist and Nobel laureate, noted for his work on quantum physics and the development of nuclear...
The repeating magazine, or rifles adopted by the armies of the great powers for military use were all bolt-operated; that is, they required manual...
ca.encarta.msn.com /Wigner_Eugene_Paul.html   (100 words)

  
 Filling The Talent Pipeline
Eugene P. Wigner (1902-1995), a Hungarian, was the first director of research and development at Clinton Laboratories (now ORNL), serving in this position from 1946 to 1947.
"Wigner brought Alvin Weinberg (director of ORNL from 1955 to 1973) to Oak Ridge from Chicago.
In an environment of increasing competition for top scientific talent, the Wigner Fellowship program is among the nation's most attractive avenues for young researchers to begin their careers.
www.ornl.gov /info/ornlreview/v38_2_05/article02.shtml   (936 words)

  
 References for Wigner   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-09-18)
E P Wigner, The recollections of Eugene P Wigner as told to Andrew Szanton (New York, 1992).
D J BenDaniel, On Wigner's suggestion of the unreasonable effectiveness of mathematics in physics, in Proceedings of the IV Wigner Symposium, Guadalajara, 1995 (River Edge, NJ, 1996), 211-215.
A Salam and V F Weisskopf, Tribute to Eugene Paul Wigner, Spacetime symmetries, Nuclear Phys.
www-history.mcs.st-and.ac.uk /Printref/Wigner.html   (358 words)

  
 AIP International Catalog of Sources   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-09-18)
Oral history interview with Eugene Paul Wigner, 1984 Apr. 12.
Wigner begins by describing how he came to Princeton (in early 1931).
Wigner describes how he officially became a physicist--his Ph.D. was in chemical engineering.
www.aip.org /history/catalog/5774.html   (162 words)

  
 Eugene Wigner - Biography
Eugene Paul Wigner, born in Budapest, Hungary, on November 17, 1902, naturalized a citizen of the United States on January 8, 1937, has been since 1938 Thomas D. Jones Professor of Mathematical Physics at Princeton University - he retired in 1971.
Wigner holds the Medal of the Franklin Society, the Max Planck Medal of the German Physical Society, the George Washington Award of the American-Hungarian Studies Foundation (1964), the Semmelweiss Medal of the American-Hungarian Medical Association (1965), and the National Medal of Science (1969).
He has received honorary degrees from the University of Wisconsin, Washington University, Case Institute, University of Alberta (Canada), University of Chicago, Colby College, University of Pennsylvania, Yeshiva University, Thiel College, Notre Dame University, Technische Universität Berlin, Swarthmore College, Université de Louvain, Université de Liège, University of Illinois, Seton Hall, Catholic University and The Rockefeller University.
nobelprize.org /physics/laureates/1963/wigner-bio.html   (381 words)

  
 Eugene Wigner - Biography
Eugene Paul Wigner, born in Budapest, Hungary, on November 17, 1902, naturalized a citizen of the United States on January 8, 1937, has been since 1938 Thomas D. Jones Professor of Mathematical Physics at Princeton University - he retired in 1971.
Wigner holds the Medal of the Franklin Society, the Max Planck Medal of the German Physical Society, the George Washington Award of the American-Hungarian Studies Foundation (1964), the Semmelweiss Medal of the American-Hungarian Medical Association (1965), and the National Medal of Science (1969).
He has received honorary degrees from the University of Wisconsin, Washington University, Case Institute, University of Alberta (Canada), University of Chicago, Colby College, University of Pennsylvania, Yeshiva University, Thiel College, Notre Dame University, Technische Universität Berlin, Swarthmore College, Université de Louvain, Université de Liège, University of Illinois, Seton Hall, Catholic University and The Rockefeller University.
www.nobel.se /physics/laureates/1963/wigner-bio.html   (366 words)

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