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Topic: Expressionism


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  WebMuseum: Expressionism
In a broader sense Expressionism is one of the main currents of art in the later 19th and the 20th centuries, and its qualities of highly subjective, personal, spontaneous self-expression are typical of a wide range of modern artists and art movements.
Expressionism can also be seen as a permanent tendency in Germanic and Nordic art from at least the European Middle Ages, particularly in times of social change or spiritual crisis, and in this sense it forms the converse of the rationalist and classicizing tendencies of Italy and later of France.
Expressionism assessed itself mostly in Germany, in 1910, (München, Dresde, Berlin), as heir of a national trend related to Grünewald: the Wallraf-Richartz museum, in Köln, has the richest collection of this era.
www.ibiblio.org /wm/paint/glo/expressionism   (586 words)

  
  Expressionism - MSN Encarta
This phase of expressionism in Germany was marked by the conscious exposition of emotions and a heightened sense of the possibilities for expressive content.
Expressionism meanwhile had become an international movement, and the influence of the Germans is seen in the works of such artists as the Austrian painter Oskar Kokoschka, the French artist Georges Rouault, the Lithuanian-born French painter Chaïm Soutine, the Bulgarian-born French painter Jules Pascin, and the American painter Max Weber (see Painting).
Expressionism in music, which crested between the two world wars, gave voice to the anxieties, inner terrors, and cynicism of human life in the 20th century through emotionally intense, musically complex, and carefully structured works.
encarta.msn.com /encyclopedia_761552391/Expressionism.html   (1103 words)

  
 WebMuseum: Expressionism
In the north of Europe, the Fauves' celebration of color was pushed to new emotional and psychological depths.
Expressionism, as it was generally known, developed almost simultaneously in different countries from about 1905.
Characterized by heightened, symbolic colors and exaggerated imagery, it was German Expressionism in particular that tended to dwell on the darker, sinister aspects of the human psyche.
www.ibiblio.org /wm/paint/tl/20th/expressionism.html   (895 words)

  
 Expressionism
Expressionism is, generally speaking, a tendency in any art form (painting, literature, film, and so on) to distort reality for emotional effect.
Expressionism is also found in other art forms - the novels of Franz Kafka are often described as expressionist, for example, and there was a concentrated Expressionist movement in early 20th century German theatre centred around Georg Kaiser[?] and Ernst Toller[?].
There was also an expressionist movement in film: see expressionism (film).
www.ebroadcast.com.au /lookup/encyclopedia/ex/Expressionism.html   (184 words)

  
 Expressionism - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Expressionism is the tendency of an artist to distort reality for an emotional effect.
Expressionism is exhibited in many art forms, including painting, literature, film, architecture and music.
The basic characteristics of expressionism are Dionysian: bold colors, distorted forms, painted in a careless manner, two-dimensional, without perspective, and based on feelings (the child) rather than rational thought (the adult).
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Expressionism   (1454 words)

  
 Vision - Online Art Gallery
Expressionism, artistic style in which the artist seeks to depict not objective reality but rather the subjective emotions and responses that objects and events arouse in him.
In a broader sense Expressionism is one of the main currents of art in the later 19th and the 20th centuries, and its qualities of highly subjective, personal, spontaneous self-expression are typical of a wide range of modern artists and art movements.
Expressionism can also be seen as a permanent tendency in Germanic and Nordic art from at least the European Middle Ages, particularly in times of social change or spiritual crisis, and in this sense it forms the converse of the rationalist and classicizing tendencies of Italy and later of France.
vision.info.bg /movements/expressionism/default.htm   (177 words)

  
 German Expressionism - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
However, the themes of Expressionism were integrated into later films of the 1920s and 1930s, resulting in an artistic control over the placement of scenery, light, and shadow to enhance the mood of a film.
Woody Allen's 1992 film, Shadows and Fog, is a pastiche of expressionism, taking cues from several films, such as the plot of M (1931) and the look of Nosferatu.
Expressionism as a movement spanned across media to include theater, architecture, music, painting, and sculpture, as well.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Expressionism_(film)   (878 words)

  
 Expressionism
Expressionism, in the visual, literary, and performing arts, is a movement or tendency that strives to express subjective feelings and emotions rather than to depict reality or nature objectively.
Expressionism meanwhile had become an international movement, and the influence of the Germans is seen in the works of such artists as the Austrian painter Oskar Kokoschka, the French artist Georges Rouault, the Lithuanian-born French painter Chaïm Soutine, the Bulgarian-born French painter Jules Pascin, and the American painter Max Weber.
Expressionism in architecture manifested through the Bauhaus Movement, that originated in Germany and spread to Denmark through Functionalism, and to The Netherlands through the artistic movement "De Stijl".
arthistory.heindorffhus.dk /frame-Style20-Expressionism.htm   (1253 words)

  
 Expressionism
Expressionism was an art movement associated mainly with German painting and film of the early 20th century, particularly following World War I. Hitchcock, a lifelong art collector, was familiar with German expressionist filmmaking from his work in Germany during the mid-1920s.
The goal of Expressionism was to evoke the subjective responses that the artist has to objects or events.
The stylistic premise of Expressionism was that the artist's response to the environment was so intense that it affected the form of the art.
faculty.cua.edu /johnsong/hitchcock/pages/expressionism/expressionism.html   (196 words)

  
 Expressionism - Expressionism Art
One of the earliest and most famous examples of Expressionism is Gogh's "The Starry Night." Whatever was cause, it cannot be denied that a great many artists of this period assumed that the chief function of art was to express their intense feelings to the world.
Vienesse Expressionism later gained significance between years 1905 and 1918 during a politically and culturally turbulent era of revelation of the profoundly problematic conditions of the turn-of-the-century Europe.
Expressionism is a style of art in which the intention is not to reproduce a subject accurately, but instead to portray it in such a way as to express the inner state of the artist...
www.huntfor.com /arthistory/C20th/expressionism.htm   (765 words)

  
 Literary Encyclopedia: Expressionism   (Site not responding. Last check: )
German expressionism – unlike related phenomena abroad – directly mirrored the crisis of the subject in the modern world and the feeling of impending doom prior to 1914, and remained closely linked to the subsequent historical events.
Expressionism, with its abundant aesthetic innovations, left an indelible imprint on later developments in modernism and has inspired painters and writers alike around the globe far into the second half of the twentieth century.
Expressionism reveals revolt, power, violence, madness, the face of the metropolis, the anxiety of the modern subject, sexuality, horror and death.
www.litencyc.com /php/stopics.php?rec=true&UID=369   (670 words)

  
 German Expressionism   (Site not responding. Last check: )
German Expressionism rose as the theatrically horrific child of two major forces in German life in the early 20th century: Expressionist art and the loss of WWI.
German Expressionism came to dominate horror and artistic cinema in the silent era, and while many other types of horror and art films were made (such as Universal's Phantom of the Opera), Expressionism remains the more well-recieved genre today.
This is due, I think, to the primary themes of Expressionism, which are based in the human struggle to make sense of the world around us.
silentmoviemonsters.tripod.com /germanexpressionism.html   (727 words)

  
 Abstract Expressionism
Expressionism, in general, describes the artist's philosophical perspective concerning the purpose of their art more than specifically defining their method.
The movement of abstract expressionism originating in the middle of the twentieth century was an approach to modernism/ post-modernism accentuating the uninhibited expression of emotions.
If abstract expressionism was to be thought of as abstract, hard edge painters took out the "abstract" in painting.
www.olinda.com /Art/Abstract_expressionism/aexpressionism.htm   (1308 words)

  
 Expressionism - Search Results - MSN Encarta
Expressionism, in the visual, literary, and performing arts, a movement or tendency that strives to express subjective feelings and emotions rather...
Abstract Expressionism, movement in mid-20th-century painting that was primarily concerned with the spontaneous assertion of the individual through...
abstract expressionism, art deco, conceptual art, constructivism, cubism, dada, expressionism, fauvism, futurism, modernism, op art, performance art,...
encarta.msn.com /Expressionism.html   (174 words)

  
 Junk for Code: expressionism
Expressionism is what we deploy to understand art --as in science reflects, photographs picture, art expresses.
Expressionism recalls the self-governing individual whose inner life can be conyveyed, or communicated to, a public composed of similar sovereign individuals.
It is part of the critique of the referential nature of language with expressionism presupposing a content that assumed to have an objective existence prior to the form of its expression.
www.sauer-thompson.com /junkforcode/archives/2006/05/post_74.html   (167 words)

  
 Expressionism   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Expressionism is a style of art in which the intention is not to reproduce a subject accurately, but instead to portray it in such a way as to express the inner state of the artist.
The movement is associated with Germany in particular, and was influenced by such emotionally-charged styles as Symbolism, Fauvism, and Cubism.
In the mid-20th century, Abstract Expressionism (in which there is no subject at all, but instead pure form) was developed into an extremely influential style.
www.cs.utexas.edu /users/s2s/latest/art1/src/proj/outline/expr.html   (487 words)

  
 MICROCOSMS: Expressionism
Expressionism, also known as non-serial atonality, is the historical continuation of the Common Practice Period.
Expressionism is most frequently associated with the word ATONAL (which means "without a tonal center").
Expressionism developed in the 1920's into Serialism, and many Expressionistic elements continue to be used today.
campus.udayton.edu /~music/faculty/magnuson/microcosms/expressionism.html   (614 words)

  
 eBay Guides - Expressionism in art - a definition and explanation   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Expressionism on the other hand, requires internal access for creation all forms, colour, shapes, lines, values; all rely on the emotive state of the artist.
Simply put, Expressionism is an art form where the extreme emotional states of the artist are applied to a surface or medium.
Demons, angst, the contradiction of the flness of life and the promise of idealism: the focus is on the emotive, and the emoting, the emphasis is on the painting process rather than the tight containers depicted in realism.
reviews.ebay.com /Expressionism-in-art-a-definition-and-explanation_W0QQugidZ10000000000930737   (991 words)

  
 Wozzeck
Expressionism, an artistic movement in which reality or aspects of reality were deliberately distorted in order to express the artist's emotional response to a subject, dominated all the arts in Germany and Austria from about 1910 to the early 1920s.
Although written some seventy years before German expressionism became an established movement, Büchner's Woyzeck had in it many elements which the expressionists regarded as anticipations of their own interests and concerns.
Another aspect of expressionism in Wozzeck is the way that it embraces the psychology of alienation.
solomonsmusic.net /wozzeck.htm   (3678 words)

  
 expressionism   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Expressionism is in every respect a complex and open term, that you can hardly define precisely.
Expressionism seems to be the expression of lifestyle of a new generation, which only agreed with disapproval of the social and politic structures.
All the problems of the new age of industry on the one hand the expansion of the city on the other hand, the loneliness of the people are topics in which art is very engaged.
www.museumonline.at /1997/schulen/weiz/expr_e.htm   (376 words)

  
 ICH WÄRE DEINE AUGEN...: Expressionism
played a key role in originating modern expressionism by clarifying and serving as a conduit for previously neglected currents in ancient art.
The basic characteristics of expressionism are Dionysian: bold colors, distorted forms, painted in a careless manner, two-dimensional, without perspective, and based on feelings (the child) rather than rational thought (the adult).
Expressionism is also used to describe other art forms.
fishong2.spaces.live.com /Blog/cns!BA5D610F2B25940A!211.entry   (965 words)

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