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Topic: Fabaceae


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  Fabaceae
The phylogenetic relationships of Fabaceae, presented on this and subsequent pages, are based on a "supertree" of the family compiled from several recent analyses, including Doyle et al.
Phylogeny of robinioid legumes (Fabaceae) revisited: Coursetia and Gliricidia recircumscribed, and a biogeographical appraisal of the Caribbean endemics.
Development of these family Fabaceae webpages for the Tree of Life Web Project, and the research on the phylogenetics of legumes by M. Wojciechowski and members of his laboratory at ASU, are supported by a grant from the US National Science Foundation (Arlington, VA) to MFW.
tolweb.org /Fabaceae/21093   (4155 words)

  
  Fabales
The rpl22 gene is in the nucleus in Polygalaceae and Fabaceae (i.e.
Fabaceae may be recognised by their compound, stipulate leaves whose leaflets are entire and often have wrinkled pulvini, and flowers with a single carpel, free petals (or two may be connate), and stamens either all similar in length, or if dissimilar, not regularly alternating longer and shorter.
Fabaceae are a notably speciose clade, particularly the branches with Mimosoideae and Faboideae (Magallón and Sanderson 2001), and contain ca 9.4% of eudicots; it has been estimated that some 16% of all woody species in neotropical rainforest are members of this family (Burnham and Johnson 2004).
www.mobot.org /MOBOT/Research/APweb/orders/fabalesweb.htm   (6439 words)

  
  Famille Total FF
Fabaceae Lespedeza daurica var shimadae (Masam.) Masam and Hosok., 1933
Fabaceae Adenanthera pavonina var microsperma (Teijsm and Binnend.) I.C Nielsen, 198
Fabaceae Halimodendron halodendron var albiflorum (Kar and Kir.) Prjech., 1970
navig-plant.ifrance.com /lieninter/dossier/famff.htm   (2137 words)

  
 Reference.com/Encyclopedia/Fabaceae
Fabaceae is the botanical name of a large and economically important family of flowering plants, which is commonly known as the legume family, pea family, bean family or pulse family.
The Fabaceae are traditionally classified into three subfamilies (raised in the alternate classification to the rank of family in the order Fabales), on the basis of flower morphology (specifically, petal shape):
Faboideae or Papilionoideae (Fabaceae sensu strictu or Papilionaceae): One petal (the banner) is large and has a crease in it, the two adjacent petals (wings) are on the sides, and the two bottom petals are joined together at the bottom, forming a boat-like structure (keel).
www.reference.com /browse/wiki/Fabaceae   (659 words)

  
 Fabaceae - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The Family Fabaceae (also as Family Leguminosae) is a grouping of plants in the Order Fabales, and one of the largest families of flowering plants with 650 genera and over 18,000 species.
The legumous plants are classified into three subfamilies, sometimes raised to the rank of family in the order Fabales, on the basis of flower morphology (specifically, petal shape):
Faboideae (Fabaceae), previously called Papilionoideae: One petal is large and has a crease in it, the two adjacent petals are on the sides, and the two bottom petals are joined together at the bottom, forming a boat-like structure.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Fabaceae   (406 words)

  
 Fabaceae Summary
The Fabaceae family, known as legumes, are one of the most important plant families in both ecological and economic terms.
The Leguminosae (or Fabaceae sensu lato) is the second largest families of flowering plants with 650 genera and over 18,000 species.
Faboideae or Papilionoideae (Fabaceae sensu strictu or Papilionaceae): One petal is large and has a crease in it, the two adjacent petals are on the sides, and the two bottom petals are joined together at the bottom, forming a boat-like structure.
www.bookrags.com /Fabaceae   (1613 words)

  
 Fabaceae
Economically and ecologically, the Fabaceae is one of the most important plant families.
The flowers of the Fabaceae are said to be papilionaceous, from a fancied resemblance to a butterfly (from the French papillon, 'butterfly').
One of the arguments for treating the three subfamilies as three separate families should be that they represent different lines of evolution from a common ancestor.
www.herbarium.usu.edu /taxa/fabaceae.htm   (881 words)

  
 ARS | Publication request: Fruits and Seeds of Genera in the Subfamily Faboideae (Fabaceae)
Citation: Kirkbride, J.H., Gunn, C.R., Weitzman, A.L. 2003 Fruits and seeds of genera in the subfamily faboideae (fabaceae).
This reference work will be used by scientists throughout the world as well as plant regulatory and seed trade officials to prevent the introduction of noxious legume weed seeds and to verify the purity of legume seed lots.
Some seed characteristics are useful for faboid generic identifications: aril presence or absence, endosperm presence or absence, radiclel concealment by the cotyledons, cotyledon lobes over the radiclel presence or absence and condition, overall radicle shape, radical tip shape, and radicle length relative to that of the cotyledons.
www.ars.usda.gov /research/publications/publications.htm?seq_no_115=179135&pf=1   (446 words)

  
 Highbeam Encyclopedia - Search Results for Fabaceae
Brassicaceae [221], Cactaceae [125], Fabaceae [179, 212, 216], Meliaceae [250], Orchidaceae...
Ohashi (1998), on cotyledon areoles in Fabaceae; Knapp (1994), on exotesta ornamentation...
Asteraceae (35 sp.), Cyperaceae (32 sp.), and Fabaceae (20 sp.).
www.encyclopedia.com /SearchResults.aspx?Q=Fabaceae   (1334 words)

  
 Flowering Plant Families, UH Botany
The Fabaceae are mostly herbs but include also shrubs and trees found in both temperate and tropical areas.
Note the tubular calyx, the conspicuous exterior banner, the long wings, and the relatively short keel.
The winged fruits are strikingly similar to those of maples and represent an interesting example of convergent evolution of wind dispersed propagules.
www.botany.hawaii.edu /faculty/carr/fab.htm   (568 words)

  
 Fabaceae
There are 630 genera and 18,000 species in the Fabaceae family.
The Fabaceae family is found in Cosmopolitan regions.
The economic uses of the Fabaceae include peanuts, soybeans, various beans, and clovers.
www.msu.edu /~jamesda1/Fabaceae.htm   (92 words)

  
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Fabaceae: Information/Images from the University of Hawaii - Manoa)
Fabaceae: Checklist from the Digital Flora of Texas (data from Synthesis of the North American Flora - 1999)
Fabaceae: Family treatment from Trees and Shrubs of the Andes of Ecuador
www.csdl.tamu.edu /FLORA/cgi/gateway_family?fam=Fabaceae   (388 words)

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