Factbites
 Where results make sense
About us   |   Why use us?   |   Reviews   |   PR   |   Contact us  

Topic: Filioque clause


Related Topics

  
  THE FILIOQUE, ONCE AGAIN
It is the inclusion of the "Filioque" in the Creed which has served as a "cause celebre" among the Eastern Orthodox to charge Eastern Catholics with the "Latin heresy" and to impede efforts for the Reunion of the Churches.
Gurovich betrays a measure of confusion in attempting to explain to his readers the Catholic doctrine of the processions in the Holy Trinity (i.e., that of the Son and that of the Holy Spirit).
As previously remarked, it is not accurate to have implied that the verbal inclusion of the "Filioque" in the Creed by Eastern rite Catholics (or even by Eastern Orthodox returning to Catholic communion) has been a "matter of faith" insisted upon by the Apostolic See of Rome.
credo.stormloader.com /Ecumenic/filioque.htm   (1412 words)

  
  Filioque clause - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
In Christian theology the filioque clause or filioque controversy (filioque meaning "and [from] the Son" in Latin) is a heavily disputed part of the Nicene Creed, that forms a divisive difference in particular between the Roman Catholic and Eastern Orthodox traditions.
The filioque clause was the main subject discussed at the 62nd meeting of the North American Orthodox-Catholic Theological Consultation, which met at the Hellenic College/Holy Cross Greek Orthodox School of Theology in Brookline from June 3 through June 5, 2002, for their spring session.
Chronology of the Filioque Controversy A one-page overview of the dispute, from 325 to 1453.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Filioque_clause   (6641 words)

  
 Filioque clause   (Site not responding. Last check: )
In Christian theology the; filioque clause or filioque controversy (filioque meaning "and [from] the Son" in Latin) is; a heavily disputed part of the Nicene Creed, that forms a divisive difference in particular between the Roman Catholic and Eastern Orthodox traditions.
In part, the filioque was originally proposed in order to stress more clearly the connection between the Son and the; Spirit, amid a heresy in which the Son was taken as less than the Father because he does not serve as a source of the Holy Spirit.
The filioque clause was the main subject discussed at the 62nd meeting of the North American Orthodox-Catholic Theological Consultation, which met at the Hellenic College/Holy Cross Greek Orthodox School of Theology in Brookline from June 3 through June 5, 2002, for their spring session.
en.encyclopediahome.com /wiki/Filioque_clause   (6624 words)

  
 Filioque Controversy
Filioque is a combination of Latin words meaning "and from the Son," added to the Nicene Creed by the Third Council of Toledo in 589: Credo in Spiritum Sanctum qui ex patre filioque procedit ("I believe in the Holy Spirit who proceeds from the Father and Son").
The filioque clause was probably devised in response to Arianism, which denied the full divinity of the Son.
So firmly resolved was the Pope that the clause should not be introduced into the creed that he presented two silver shields to the Confessio in St. Peter's at Rome, on one of which was engraved the creed in Latin and on the other in Greek, without the addition.
mb-soft.com /believe/txn/filioque.htm   (3018 words)

  
 Stylianopoulos - The Filioque: Dogma, Theologoumenon or Error?
It is not that the filioque implies two sources in the Godhead because already Augustine himself taught that the Spirit proceeds from the Father and the Son as from a single source or principle.
In this perspective the filioque is a dogmatic clue or doctrinal pointer to a theology which tilts the Cappadocian balance between the threefoldness and the unity of the Trinity toward the Sabellian side.
The second key factor in the resolution of the filioque question is the recognition that biblical and patristic theology commonlly affirm the teaching of the "monarchy" of the Father, i.e., that the Father is "the sole principle (ἀρχή), source (πηγή), and cause (αἰτία) of divinity" (Klingenthal Memorandum).
www.geocities.com /trvalentine/orthodox/stylianopoulos_filioque.html   (9587 words)

  
 Talk:Filioque - OrthodoxWiki
Charlemagne called for a council at Aix-la-Chapelle in 809 at which Pope Leo III forbade the use of the filioque clause and ordered that the original version of the Nicene-Constantinopolitan Creed be engraved on silver tablets displayed at St. Peter's Basilica in Rome so that his conclusion would not be overturned in the future.
Is the teaaching of the filioque orthodox or heterodox?
A distinction must be made between the heterodox filioque (the teaching that the Spirit is dependent upon the Son as well as the Father for his origin) and the orthodox filioque (the perfectly Orthodox idea that the Spirit proceeds from the Father through (dia) the Son.
orthodoxwiki.org /Talk:Filioque   (1690 words)

  
 The Creed - phatmass phorum
The doctrine of the Filioque must be understood and presented by the Catholic Church in such a way that it cannot appear to contradict the Monarchy of the Father nor the fact that he is the sole origin (arche, aitia) of the ekporeusis of the Spirit.
The Filioque is, in fact, situated in a theological and linguistic context different from that of the affirmation of the sole Monarchy of the Father, the one origin of the Son and of the Spirit.
The Catholic Church interprets the Filioque with reference to the conciliar and ecumenical, normative, and irrevocable value of the confession of faith in the eternal origin of the Holy Spirit, as defined in 381 by the Ecumenical Council of Constantinople in its Symbol.
www.phatmass.com /phorum/index.php?showtopic=18477   (4794 words)

  
 The Wording of the Nicene Creed
Textbooks of Church history usually refer to this as the "filioque clause controversy." (Filioque is Latin for "and the Son.") The creedal citation referenced actually appears in the Creed of the Council of Constantinople (381).
Nevertheless, the filioque clause was added to the creed recited in the Roman Mass (Latin Rite) by Pope Benedict VIII (1024), but was not used in the liturgy of the Eastern Rites.
The filioque clause has been cited as one of the official causes of the schism between the Western and Eastern Churches in 1054.
www.catholiceducation.org /articles/religion/re0071.html   (870 words)

  
 Wikinfo | Filioque clause
In the Eastern part of the undivided Catholic church the spirit was seen as originating from the Father alone, although the Son sent the Holy Spirit under the title paraclete.
In the ninth century, Pope Leo III agreed to the filioque clause theologically, but was opposed to adopting it in worship in Rome, and insisted on using the Nicene Creed in Mass in Rome as it was expressed at the Council of Ephesus and all the Ecumenical Councils up until that time.
As a result of these modern discussions, it has been suggested that the Orthodox could accept an "economic" filioque that states that the Holy Spirit, who originates in the Father alone, was sent to the Church "through the Son" (as the Paraclete), but this is not any sort of official Orthodox doctrine.
www.wikinfo.org /wiki.php?title=Filioque_clause   (694 words)

  
 Filioque - Proceeds from the Father and the Son
The insertion of the "filioque" clause is very important as it expresses a Catholic dogma, which is denied by some-the procession of the Holy Ghost from BOTH the Father and the Son.
The doctrine of the Filioque was dogmatically declared in the Fourth Lateran Council, Second Council of Lyons, and the Council of Florence.
Therefore, since the Eastern uniates, are not obliged to include the filioque clause in the Creed, it should have no effect on a union with the schismatic orthodox.
www.catholicapologetics.info /apologetics/protestantism/filioque.htm   (1332 words)

  
 Filioque clause - Article from FactBug.org - the fast Wikipedia mirror site   (Site not responding. Last check: )
In Christian theology the filioque clause ("and the Son") is a disputed part of the Nicene Creed.
Following John 15:26b, the Nicene Creed states that the Holy Spirit "proceeds from the Father." This creed was first promulgated at the First Council of Nicea in 325 and modified at the First Council of Constantinople in 381.
In part, the filioque was originally proposed in order to stress more clearly the connection between the Son and the Spirit, amid circumstances in which the writings of the Greek Fathers of the Church were not available.
www.factbug.org /cgi-bin/a.cgi?a=11110   (4746 words)

  
 The fathers of the church on the filioque clause   (Site not responding. Last check: )
The filioque is not a theologoumenon, because it contradicts the dogma of the Monarchy of the Father.
None of those quotes speak to the Filioque as espoused by the Latins - that the Father and the Son are the eternal source of the Holy Spirit.
In the eyes of the West, a rejection of the filioque implies that the Son is lesser than the Father.
www.orthodoxchristianity.net /forum/index.php?topic=7841.0   (2051 words)

  
 [No title]   (Site not responding. Last check: )
It is the inclusion of the “Filioque” in the Creed which has served as a “cause celebre” among the Eastern Orthodox to charge Eastern Catholics with the “Latin heresy” and to impede efforts for the Reunion of the Churches.
As previously remarked, it is not accurate to have implied that the verbal inclusion of the “Filioque” in the Creed by Eastern rite Catholics (or even by Eastern Orthodox returning to Catholic communion) has been a “matter of faith” insisted upon by the Apostolic See of Rome.
He correctly notes that regardless of whether the “Filioque” is included in the Creed during the Divine Liturgy (or Mass) “both the Eastern and Western Churches believe the same thing concerning the procession of the Holy Spirit.
www.freewebs.com /rgrebenc/TheFilioqueOnceAgain.doc   (1307 words)

  
 Ecumenical Christian Creeds
A major controversy in the church has swirled around one phrase of the creed, the so-called filioque clause.
As a result, the Eastern Church has never used the version with the filioque clause (see Eastern Orthodox Catechism), while most churches that derive from the Western tradition use the creed with the filioque clause.
However, the Episcopal Church has recently approved omission of the filioque clause in new editions of the Book of Common Prayer.
www.cresourcei.org /creedsearly.html   (2686 words)

  
 The Orthodox Web Site for information about the faith, life and worship of the Orthodox Church
The Filioque was first used in Rome at the coronation of Henry II in 1014 as emperor of the Holy Roman Empire.
The Filioque expressed a novel belief which was not a part of that which had been believed 'everywhere, always, and by all'.
Apologists for the Filioque frequently assert that 'proceeds from the Father and the Son' is equivalent to 'proceeds from the Father through the Son'.
www.orthodox.clara.net /belief.htm   (9442 words)

  
 The Nicene Creed
In 796, Paulinus of Aquileia defended the filioque clause at the Synod of Friuli, which indicates that it was opposed, and after about 800 it crept into the liturgy in the Frankish Empire.
Leo arranged for the creed in its original form (without the filioque clause) to be engraved on silver tablets and he had them placed at St. Peter’s tomb.
Protestants inherited the filioque clause from the Roman Catholic Church.
www.kencollins.com /why-07.htm   (1740 words)

  
 Ask Me... filioque clause, Bayside "apparition," Moslems honor Mary   (Site not responding. Last check: )
"Filioque" means simply "and from the Son." The Holy Ghost proceeds "from the Father and the Son," as from one principle.
The Councils of the Church and the Popes did not force the Greeks to insert Filioque into the Nicean Creed, but to accept simply the double procession of the Holy Ghost from the Father and the Son.
The rejection of the Filioque and denial of the primacy of Roman Pontiffs are the principal errors of the Greek schismatic Church.
www.sspx.ca /Angelus/1984_September/Ask_Me.htm   (841 words)

  
 Filioque - Catholic Answers Forums
The filioque indeed was used to combat the Arian heresy.
By stating the filioque, we believe that the Son also initiates the procession of the Holy Spirit from Himself - the Son - not in the manner from where it originates - in the Father.
The filioque is saying that the Holy Spirit does also proceed from the Son because the Son also can and does initiates (that's why it's and the Son and not solely through the Son), but not in the same manner as that from the Father who is the origin of the Holy Spirit.
forums.catholic.com /showthread.php?t=65811   (3894 words)

Try your search on: Qwika (all wikis)

Factbites
  About us   |   Why use us?   |   Reviews   |   Press   |   Contact us  
Copyright © 2005-2007 www.factbites.com Usage implies agreement with terms.