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Topic: Finnish Karelia


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In the News (Thu 23 May 19)

  
  Finnish language - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Finnish (suomi (♫)) is the language spoken by the majority of the population in Finland (92%) and by ethnic Finns outside Finland.
The Ruija dialect (Ruijan murre) is spoken in Finnmark (Finnish Ruija), in Norway.
The South-Eastern dialects (kaakkoismurteet) are spoken in South Karelia, on the Karelian Isthmus and in Ingria.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Finnish_language   (5325 words)

  
 Republic of Karelia - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-06)
Karelia is populated chiefly by Russians (73.6% of the population) and (ethnically Finnic) Karelians (10.0%).
Historically Karelia was a region to the northwest of Russia, east of present-day Finland.
Finnish and Russian are the official languages of the republic.
www.bexley.us /project/wikipedia/index.php/Republic_of_Karelia   (739 words)

  
 Karelia - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Karelia is the land of the Karelian people, that inhabitated vast areas in Northern Europe, of historical significance for Finland, Russia and Sweden.
In the 1940s, most of Finnish Karelia was first ceded to the Soviet Union in the Peace of Moscow that followed the Winter War (1939–1940), then re-conquered for three years during the Continuation War 1941–1944 when also East Karelia was occupied by the Finns.
Tver Karelia denotes the villages in the Tver Oblast that are inhabited by Karelians.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Karelia   (807 words)

  
 Finnish Karelia - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-06)
The most of Finnish Karelia was ceded by Finland to the Soviet Union in 1940, after the Winter War, and today parted between the Russian autonomous Republic of Karelia and the Russian Leningrad Oblast.
The traditional culture of "Ladoga-Karelia", or Finnish Karelia according to the pre-Winter War borders, was by and large similar to that of Eastern Karelia, or Russian Karelia.
The Karelian language is very closely related to the Finnish language, and particularly by Finnish linguists seen as a dialect of Finnish, although the variety spoken in East Karelia is usually seen as a proper language.
www.pineville.us /project/wikipedia/index.php/Finnish_Karelia   (785 words)

  
 Encyclopedia: Karelian language
It belongs to the Finno-Ugric languages, and is chiefly distinguished from standard Finnish by the lack of influence from modern 19th and 20th century Finnish.
In Finnish usage, however, Karelian mostly denotes the dialects of the 420,000 refugees from the Karelian isthmus and other parts of Finnish Karelia that were re-settled in what remains of Finland after World War II.
Finnish, and not Karelian, was the second official language of Karelia from the Winter War 1940 up until the 1980s[2] (http://www.helsinki-hs.net/news.asp?id=20020129IE17), when perestroika began.
www.nationmaster.com /encyclopedia/Karelian-language   (2181 words)

  
 Karelia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-06)
Karelia, Karjala (in Finnish) or Karelen (in Swedish), is a historical province in eastern Finland.
Present-day Finnish Karelia is divided upon the administrative provinces of Eastern Finland (Northern Karelia) and Southern Finland (Southern Karelia).
The traditional culture of Ladoga-Karelia, or Finnish Karelia (according to the pre-Winter War borders), was by and large similar to that of East-Karelia, or Russian Karelia.
www.theezine.net /k/karelia.html   (601 words)

  
 FINNISH KARELIA FACTS AND INFORMATION   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-06)
The most of Finnish Karelia was ceded by Finland to the Soviet_Union in 1940, after the Winter_War, and today parted between the Russian autonomous Republic_of_Karelia and the Russian Leningrad_Oblast.
Western Karelia, as an historical Province of Sweden, was religiously and politically distict from the eastern parts that were under the Russian_Orthodox_Church.
The Kalevala and Finnish Art_Nouveau are expressions hereof.
www.witwib.com /Finnish_Karelia   (668 words)

  
 South Karelia - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-06)
It borders to the regions of Kymenlaakso, Southern Savonia, North Karelia and to Russia.
The term "South Karelia" might also be used to refer to the southern parts of the entire Karelia — the Region of South Karelia is termed "South" because it is the southernmost part of Karelia on Finnish territory.
The coat of arms of South Karelia is composed of the arms of Karelia.
www.bexley.us /project/wikipedia/index.php/South_Karelia   (180 words)

  
 Finnish Karelia - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The "Third Swedish crusade", led by the marshal Torkel Knutsson, which took place 1293–1295, resulted in the western parts of Karelia coming under Swedish rule, and in the building of the Castle of Vyborg.
After the Treaty of Nystad in 1721 Vyborg and the Kexholm County were ceded to Russia; and the rest was incorporated into the Kymmenegårds and Nyslott County.
[2] The dialect that is spoken in North Karelia is considered to be one of the Savonian dialects.
www.wikipedia.org /wiki/Finnish_Karelia   (747 words)

  
 Finnish Karelia -- Facts, Info, and Encyclopedia article   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-06)
Finnish Karelia, historically also Swedish Karelia or Carelia, is a (Click link for more info and facts about historical province) historical province in eastern (Republic in northern Europe; achieved independence from Russia in 1917) Finland.
Parts of the historical province of Karelia are divided between the (The proper sphere or extent of your activities) Provinces, of Eastern Finland and Southern Finland.
Western Karelia, as an historical (Click link for more info and facts about Province of Sweden) Province of Sweden, was religiously and politically distict from the eastern parts that were under the (An independent church with its own Patriarch; until 1917 it was the established church or Russia) Russian Orthodox Church.
www.absoluteastronomy.com /encyclopedia/F/Fi/Finnish_Karelia.htm   (1044 words)

  
 Tarton Rauha
Finnish Karelia used to be the most important national, cultural and economic province of Finland.
To the Finns, Finnish Karelia is a historic Finnish province.
The pro Karelia movement believes that it would be in the interest of Russia to return the ceded Finnish territories to Finland, because this is the way truly to normalise relations between the two countries.
tartonrauha.net /m8.php   (1573 words)

  
 Continuation War
Finland took no part in the initial German invasion of the Soviet Union on June 22, since the Finnish government did not wish to appear as the aggressor; the popular support for such a move was deemed insufficient, and international relations would have suffered in vain.
In December 1941, the Finnish advance had reached the outskirts of Leningrad and the River Svir (which connects the southern ends of Lake Ladoga and Lake Onega and marks the southern border of East Karelia).
Finnish Jews served in the Finnish army, and Jews were not only tolerated in Finland[1], but most Jewish refugees also were granted asylum (less than 20 of the more than 500 refugees were handed over to the Nazis).
www.brainyencyclopedia.com /encyclopedia/c/co/continuation_war.html   (5793 words)

  
 Many Karelias — Virtual Finland
During the period of the autonomous Grand Duchy of Finland, the economic life of Finnish Karelia was largely oriented towards St Petersburg, the economy of the isthmus in particular being effectively dependent on the Russian capital.
The predominantly agricultural and forestry-based economy of North Karelia went through dramatic restructuring in the 1960s and 1970s in particular, and the region suffered a considerable drain of population to the urban centres in the south of the country and across the Gulf of Bothnia in Sweden.
Karelian settlement in pre-revolutionary Russian Karelia was divided between the provinces of Archangel in the north and Olonets in the south.
virtual.finland.fi /finfo/english/karjala.html   (3290 words)

  
 The Mick Sinclair Archive: Karelia
Karelia is barely known in the West, probably because it no longer exists as a country but is a region split almost equally between Finland and the Soviet Union.
The most recent change, after World War II (Russian presence in Karelia was a prime cause of non-Nazi Finland entering the war on the German side), saw the entire eastern section of Karelia being ceded to the Soviet Union and its population fleeing almost en masse behind the new Finnish border.
Crossing directly into Soviet Karelia from Finland is likely to become possible this year, largely through the efforts of Kuhmon Kulttuurikornitsa (roughly, a Karelian culture centre) which is based in Kuhmo, in Finland, and intent on promoting the notion of Karelia as a region regardless of the national and ideological boundaries imposed upon it.
micksinclair.com /timeout/kare.html   (1111 words)

  
 Finland: Soviet Annexation Of Karelia Still A Taboo Subject
The claim that Karelia is sparsely populated is not true, however.
According to a Finnish Foreign Ministry official, the fact that there are no Finns left in Karelia is one of the reasons why Helsinki has not officially raised the possibility of Karelia being returned.
Finnish freelance journalist Markus Lehtipuu told RFE/RL that he believes as many as 90 percent of the deportees want to see Karelia returned, but that Karelia remains a "taboo subject" in Finnish foreign policy.
www.freeserbia.net /Articles/2003/Karelia.html   (1173 words)

  
 Kommersant: Finnish Pro Karelia Demanding Contribution, Captured Land from Russia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-06)
Finnish public organization Pro Karelia, calling for returning to Finland the land obtained by the former USSR after the WW2, has posted on its web-site a detailed map of the allegedly captured territories and the plan to transfer them to Helsinki.
Pro Karelia seeks the return of some Karelia’s frontier territories, the Karelian Isthmus, Vyborg-town, the Leningrad Region, and Pechenega area in the Murmansk Region, Russia’s daily Izvestia reports.
However, Pro Karelia as well as a raft of other Finnish public organizations claim the Finnish borders are to be set under the Tartu peace treaty made with the Soviet Russia after the 1918-1920 military conflict.
www.kommersant.com /page.asp?id=-5261   (506 words)

  
 Karjalane lehüt - Karelian page (in English)
The Soviet national and linguistic policy in the Tver Karelia during the 1930's - Paper presented at the seminar of the Graduate school on Karelia, East Europe and Russia of the Joensuu University 18.4.1997 (in Finnish)
Finnish has also been suggested as the second official language of the republic.
WWW-servers in the Republic of Karelia and the Tver region
www.geocities.com /Athens/4280/eng_index.html   (416 words)

  
 Gylling in SU
Nonetheless the haunting expression reveals how difficult was the transition for her from wife of prominent Finnish politician and intellectual to wife of a Soviet regional leader.
Gylling's article of 1925 on his plans for the future development of Karelia reveals his conception of Karelia as a distinctive region of the Soviet Union, geographically, geologically and economically bound to the Finno-Scandinavian plateau of which it was an integral part.
For Gylling, Karelia's proximity to Finland and its tradition as the place where the events of the Finnish national epoch, The Kalevala, had occurred were far more significant than Karelia's position as a constituent part of the Soviet Union.
www.d.umn.edu /~apogorel/karelia/GinSU.html   (858 words)

  
 The Terror
Some of the Finnish Americans believed that Gylling had been promoted not understanding that their own security was now as precarious as his.
In Karelia Finnish newspapers and the Finnish radio station were shut down.
Finnish Americans were now caught up in the holocaust that had begun in late 1936 in the rest of the Soviet Union.
www.d.umn.edu /~apogorel/karelia/Terror.html   (491 words)

  
 01.07.2002 - The visit of the Finnish delegation to Karelia has come to the end   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-06)
The basic purpose of this visit is acquaintance to the Republic of Karelia and negotiations with the administration of the republic on the problems of prospects of development of contiguous cooperation between the Republic of Karelia and Finland.
During the visit the meetings of Jan-Erik Enestam with the Head of the Republic of Karelia Sergey Katanandov were held.
In end of stay in Karelia Jan-Eric Enestam has held the press conference, during which he has summed up the visit and has stated his evaluation of cooperation between Karelia and Finland.
www.gov.karelia.ru /gov/News/2002/0701_11_e.html   (339 words)

  
 Finnish Karelia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-06)
The most of Finnish Karelia was ceded by Finland to the Soviet Union in 1940, after the Winter War, and today belongs to the autonomous Republic of Karelia, in Russia.
, which took place 1293–1295, resulted in the western parts of Karelia coming under Swedish rule, and in the building of the Castle of Vyborg.
[1] The dialect that is spoken in North Karelia is considered to be one of the Savonian dialects.
www.sciencedaily.com /encyclopedia/finnish_karelia   (782 words)

  
 Karelia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-06)
Karelia was bitterly fought over by Sweden and Novgorod in the 13th century.
Thus the irredentist hopes for Finland's re-acquisition of the lost Finnish Karelia live on in for instance the Karjala takaisin -movement.
http://www.internetix.ofw.fi/opinnot/opintojaksot/8kieletkirjallisuus/aidinkieli/murteet/kaakkois.html The dialect in North Karelia is part of the large group of Savonian dialects.
www.worldhistory.com /wiki/K/Karelia.htm   (824 words)

  
 Karelia in Soviet Union   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-06)
Until 1938, the flag of the Soviet Union was in use, according to Paskov [pas94].
This is the flag Paskov [pas94] describes as "The Flag of the Russian Federation adopted in the Olonets Province in 1918".
When the Soviets invaded Finland in 1940, a Provisional Finnish People's Government was created in Karelia as a precursor to Soviet rule being established in Finland and the establishment of a Finnish SSR of which Karelia would be part.
www.crwflags.com /fotw/flags/su-kf.html   (1155 words)

  
 Top Story - EU Distant Despite Will In Provinces - The St. Petersburg Times. General news from St.Petersburg and Russia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-06)
IMATRA, Finnish Karelia - While the development of relations between the Russian border town Svetogorsk in the Leningrad Oblast and its Finnish neighbor Imatra has been frozen for more than a decade, officials and citizens in both towns want closer contact, they said at a conference in Imatra on Tuesday.
Once Finnish shoppers started going to Tallinn, Finnish producers were also able to sell their goods in Estonia to those shoppers, he said.
While Finnish officials are talking about the need for a free economic zone in the area in order to increase its attractiveness, Svetogorsk officials are convinced the investment project would be successful enough without this added incentive.
www.sptimes.ru /archive/times/1071/top/t_15759.htm   (766 words)

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