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Topic: First past the post electoral system


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In the News (Sat 20 Apr 19)

  
  First Past the Post electoral system
This system is in use at all levels of politics - famously in the United Kingdom.
The first past the post election system is used on Taiwan for executive offices such as county magistrates, mayors, and the president, but not for legislative seats which used the single non-transferable vote system.
This facet of the system leads to the practice of gerrymandering, which is the drawing of electoral district boundaries for the purpose of influencing an election.
www.ebroadcast.com.au /lookup/encyclopedia/pl/Plurality_voting.html   (710 words)

  
  Science Fair Projects - First Past the Post electoral system
The First Past the Post electoral system is a voting system for single-member districts, variously called First Past the Post electoral system (FPTP or FPP), winner-take-all, plurality voting, or relative majority.
However, the system of forming a governing government is also crucial; it is very common in former British colonies and is the single most commonly used system for election of parliaments [1] based on FPTP voting districts.
The term "first past the post" refers to a now seldom-used analogy with horse racing, where the winner is the first to pass a particular point (in this case a plurality of votes), upon which all other runners automatically and completely lose ("winner take all").
www.all-science-fair-projects.com /science_fair_projects_encyclopedia/First_past_the_post   (2144 words)

  
  Plurality electoral system - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The Plurality electoral system (or first past the post electoral system), is a voting system for single-member districts.
The term "first past the post" refers to a now seldom-used analogy with horse racing, where the winner is the first to pass a particular point (in this case a plurality of votes), upon which all other runners automatically and completely lose ("winner take all").
The first past the post election system is used in the Republic of China on Taiwan for executive offices such as county magistrates, mayors, and the president, but not for legislative seats which used the single non-transferable vote system.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Plurality_voting   (3241 words)

  
 D@dalos education server - Democracy: Electoral law
Taking a brief look at the main differences of the two systems should demonstrate the extent to which the political style and structure of a community can be influenced by its system of electoral law.
The electorate's ability to influence the final shape of a government and its leadership is one of the advantages of a two-party system stabilized by first-past-the-post system.
The first-past-the-post system often leads to negative effects among populations that are divided and in disagreement about basic political questions, since inflexibility between opposing parties means a change of government is often not possible.
www.dadalos.org /int/Demokratie/Demokratie/Grundkurs3/Wahlen/wahlrecht.htm   (1528 words)

  
 Plurality voting system - QuickSeek Encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: )
The plurality voting system (also known as first past the post) is a voting system used to elect a single winner in a given election.
In an election for a single seat, such as president in a presidential system, the same style of ballot is used and the candidate who receives the largest number of votes represents the entire population.
The plurality election system is used in the Republic of China on Taiwan for executive offices such as county magistrates, mayors, and the president, but not for legislative seats which used the single non-transferable vote system.
encyclopedia.quickseek.com /index.php/First_Past_the_Post_electoral_system   (3646 words)

  
 Australian Parliamentary Library - 1996-97 Research Note 6
In the first referendum, held on 19 September 1992, voters were asked firstly to choose between electoral reform or maintaining the first past the post system.
The Mixed Member Proportional system is an attempt to overcome one of the perceived weaknesses of proportional representational systems, ie the lack of individual constituency representation, by combining aspects of proportional representation with single member constituencies.
Electors will have two votes: one Electorate Vote to elect the local member using the first past the post system and one Party Vote for the party to be represented in Parliament.
www.aph.gov.au /LIBRARY/Pubs/rn/1996-97/97rn6.htm   (1148 words)

  
 First Past the Post electoral system : Plurality voting   (Site not responding. Last check: )
The first past the post election system is used on Taiwan for executive offices such as county magistrates, mayors, and the president, but not for legislative seats which used the single non-transferable vote system.
If the system has multiple areas, such as the states in the electoral college system for the US presidential elections, or the constituencies for the UK parliamentary elections, the system favors political parties with concentrated geographical support, as they can command the majority in that area.
This facet of the system leads to the practice of gerrymandering, which is the drawing of electoral district boundaries for the purpose of influencing an election.
www.termsdefined.net /pl/plurality-voting.html   (822 words)

  
 First Past the Post electoral system - Electowiki
The first-past-the-post electoral system is a voting system for single-member districts, variously called first-past-the-post (FPTP or FPP), winner-take-all, plurality voting, or relative majority.
The term "first past the post" refers to a now seldom-used analogy with horse racing, where the winner is the first to pass a particular point (in this case a plurality of votes), upon which all other runners automatically and completely lose ("winner take all").
The first past the post election system is used in the Republic of China on Taiwan for executive offices such as county magistrates, mayors, and the president, but not for legislative seats which used the single non-transferable vote system.
wiki.electorama.com /wiki/First-past-the-post   (2015 words)

  
 ::First Past the Post ::
The British electoral system is based on the "First-Past-The-Post" (FPTP) system.
In the past, this system and the whole structure of elections, created absurd anomalies with the existence of "rotten boroughs" such as Old Sarum, Dunwich and Gatton.
The chaos of the political systems of Italy and Israel is avoided using FPTP.
www.historylearningsite.co.uk /first_past_the_post.htm   (1260 words)

  
 Electoral Systems (BP334E)   (Site not responding. Last check: )
The subject of electoral systems, though dry-as-dust to some and arcane to many, is --- or ought to be --- of central interest to anyone concerned with the operation of democratic systems of government.
At the first count, candidate D obtained the threshold of 251 votes, was declared elected and had his or her 19 surplus votes redistributed.
These systems combine some of the advantages of PR and plurality systems by ensuring that not only do multiple points of view within a constituency gain legislative representation (as is the case under PR), but also that those elected have significant levels of support from the electorate.
www.parl.gc.ca /information/library/PRBpubs/bp334-e.htm   (7242 words)

  
 Canadian Electoral Reform
In early 2004, the Law Commission of Canada issued a report recommending that the federal electoral system be changed to a mixed member system that allows for more proportional representation of parties in the House of Commons.
In the event that no one has a majority of first choice votes, then the candidate with the least number is dropped off the list, and their ballot papers are examined to redistribution according to the second choice marked on the ballot.
The success with which a PR system provides parties with a share of the seats that is proportional to their vote share is dependent on several factors including the number of parties that fall short of the threshold and whether the votes and seats are counted up either nationally, provincially, or regionally.
www.sfu.ca /~aheard/elections/reform.html   (2517 words)

  
 Liberal Democrats (UK) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The long-term implications of this trend in British politics could be profound, since the British electoral system makes it nearly impossible for the Conservatives to return a government without winning some city seats (such as the now Lib Dem Bristol West constituency, which the Tories held until 1997, but where they are now coming third).
The British first past the post electoral system does not reward parties whose vote is evenly divided across the nation with many seats in Parliament, and the Liberal Democrats and their forerunners have suffered in particular.
This was especially true in 1983 and 1987 when their popular electoral support was greatest; their increase in the number of seats in 1997 and 2001 was largely due to the weakness of the Conservative Party in the later elections.
www.wikipedia.org /wiki/Liberal_Democrats_(UK)   (3498 words)

  
 First past the post: Canada's voting system
The First past the post electoral system is a voting system for single-member districts.
The term "first past the post", as stated above, refers to a now seldom-used analogy with horse racing, where the winner is the first to pass a particular point (in this case a plurality of votes), upon which all other runners automatically and completely lose ("winner take all").
Although "first past the post" is the standard term in Canada, the term may have originally had a pejorative meaning, again based on the horse racing analogy: once a particular party achieves plurality ("passing the post") there is no point in counting any further votes.
www.canadian-politics.com /elections/elections_fptp.shtml   (2321 words)

  
 BBC NEWS | VOTE2001 | VOTING SYSTEM | First past the post
The electoral system used for UK general elections is commonly known as first past the post.
There is no requirement for a candidate to win a majority of the votes cast, which is the case in some electoral systems.
This involves most of the representatives being elected via first past the post with a "top-up" vote rewarding parties that win many votes but fail to win seats.
news.bbc.co.uk /vote2001/hi/english/voting_system/newsid_1173000/1173697.stm   (732 words)

  
 Terms and Definitions
Counting is identical to a First Past the Post system, with the candidates with the highest vote totals winning the seats.
Mixed Member Proportional - A mixed system in which the choices expressed by the voters are used to elect representatives through two different systems - Party-list Proportional Representation and (usually) one plurality/majority system - where the Party-list Proportional Representation system compensates for the disproportionality in the results from the plurality/majority system.
The first round is conducted in the same way as a normal First Past the Post election.
africanelections.tripod.com /terms.html   (783 words)

  
 Mapleleafweb.com: Electoral Reform Movement - Canadian electoral system in detail
The history of the system precedes Confederation; it was first used to elect members to the Nova Scotia legislature in 1758 (Source: Law Reform Commission of Canada,).
The single member plurality system is often referred to as the ‘first past the post’ system simply because, in a sense, it can be characterized as a race.
While the first past the post system has been greatly criticized in recent years, it does have several advantages over other types of systems.
www.mapleleafweb.com /features/electoral/reform/system-detail.html   (978 words)

  
 Referendum Information Office - Electoral Systems: First Past the Post and BC-STV
There is a variety of specific electoral systems and no two countries' system are identical, but there are three basic groups of systems: plurality, majoritarian, and proportional.
It is an electoral system that is designed to produce a fairly proportional result -- that is, the number of seats a political party wins should be close to its share of the overall popular vote.
An electoral quota is calculated to determine how many votes are needed to win in each district, and a process of transferring voters' second, third, and further choices is used to determine who gets elected.
www.gov.bc.ca /referendum_info/popt/electoral_systems_first_past_the_post_and_bc_stv.htm   (402 words)

  
 International IDEA | Glossary of Terms
First Past The Post is the simplest form of plurality/majority electoral system.
A Two-Round System may take a majority-plurality form–more than two candidates contest the second round and the one wins the highest number of votes in the second round is elected, regardless of whether they have won an absolute majority–or a majority run-off form–only the top two candidates in the first round contest the second round.
A Parallel System is a mixed system in which the choices expressed by the voters are used to elect representatives through two different systems–one List PR system and (usually) one plurality/majority system–but where no account is taken of the seats allocated under the first system in calculating the results in the second system.
www.idea.int /esd/glossary.cfm   (845 words)

  
 Thomson Nelson - Political Science Resource Centre
The matter was put to the electorate in a referendum in May 2005; although 58% voted in favour, the results fell short of the 60% that would have required the government to introduce enabling legislation into the legislature.
The PEI government created an Electoral Reform Commission whose report published in late 2003 recommended that the province should explore adopting some form of proportional representation; the two preferred options were identified the single transferrable vote or mixed member proportional systems.
Nunavut 1999 - the first election for the new territory!
polisci.nelson.com /elections.html   (1253 words)

  
 The Progressive Right
First past the post is only the electoral choice of 8 countries of the world.
First past the post lets parties exploit the weaknesses of the system to their advantage.
So, under the first past the post system, not only is it possible for a minority to elect a majority and for the second most popular party to form a majority government (see False Majorities) - it's even possible for an opposition to be completely shut out despite taking 40% of the vote.
progressiveright.blogspot.com   (3890 words)

  
 FairVote - In the News
Last week's report on electoral reform released by the House Affairs Committee illustrates not only how remote the prospects are for addressing the failures of the federal first-past-the-post electoral system.
Last week's report on electoral reform released byadure and House Affairs Committee illustrates not only how remote the prospects are for addressing the failures of the federal first-past-the-post electoral system but it also shows how much disdain MPs have for ordinary Canadians.
If a voter's first choice is not elected, his or her subsequent choices would be counted.
www.fairvote.org /per/?page=39&articlemode=showspecific&showarticle=879   (811 words)

  
 Reference.com/Encyclopedia/Plurality voting system
The most common system, used in Canada, India, the UK, and the USA, is first past the post or winner-takes-all, a voting system in which a single winner is chosen in a given constituency by having the most votes, regardless of whether or not he or she has a majority of votes.
Historically, FPTP has been a contentious electoral system, giving rise to the concept of electoral reform and a multiplicity of different voting systems intended to address perceived weaknesses of plurality voting.
Alternative electoral systems attempt to ensure that almost all votes are effective in influencing the result and the number of wasted votes is consequently minimised.
www.reference.com /browse/wiki/First_past_the_post   (4430 words)

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