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Topic: First law of thermodynamics


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In the News (Wed 21 Aug 19)

  
  First Law of Thermodynamics
The first law of thermodynamics is the application of the conservation of energy principle to heat and thermodynamic processes:
It is typical for chemistry texts to write the first law as ΔU=Q+W. It is the same law, of course - the thermodynamic expression of the conservation of energy principle.
Four quantities called "thermodynamic potentials" are useful in the chemical thermodynamics of reactions and non-cyclic processes.
hyperphysics.phy-astr.gsu.edu /hbase/thermo/firlaw.html   (515 words)

  
  thermodynamics - HighBeam Encyclopedia
thermodynamics branch of science concerned with the nature of heat and its conversion to mechanical, electric, and chemical energy.
The system is thermally insulated from the environment, and the first law of thermodynamics requires that the work done by or on the system be equal to the loss or gain of the system's internal energy.
This statement constitutes the first law of thermodynamics, which is a general form of the law of conservation of energy (see conservation laws).
www.encyclopedia.com /doc/1E1-thermody.html   (1216 words)

  
 Evidence for the supernatural origin of the universe
I represent the first law of thermodynamics (FLT) as claiming that “energy cannot be created by natural means.” Krueger claims that this is not what the first law of thermodynamics says (recorded on video during the spring 2002 debate).
He objects to the use of “natural means,” claiming that the statement of the first law of thermodynamics must conform to a “word for word” definition, and further that the first law of thermodynamics does not apply to origin of energy.
The first law of thermodynamics describes that energy is conserved, thus detecting new forms of energy is not the result of natural creation but rather a change in form of existing energy.
www.uark.edu /~cdm/creation/universe1stlaw.htm   (2099 words)

  
 Entropy: The Ultimate and Most Pervasive Law of Nature
There are three Laws of Thermodynamics, but we need to concern ourselves only with the first two laws because they are closely interwoven and can actually be expressed in one sentence: The total energy content of the universe is constant and the total entropy, the non-usable energy, is constantly increasing.
The laws of thermodynamics are among the very few laws of nature that describe phenomena that are an integral part of the origin of the universe, of the Big Bang.
Murphy's law is an inescapable consequence of the principle of Entropy.
www.rationality.net /entropy.htm   (3898 words)

  
 Creation Resource Sheet - Thermodynamics and Origins
The first law has been defined as follows: When a closed system is altered adiabatically, the total work associated with the change of state is the same for all possible processes between the two given equilibrium states.
The only position that appears to be consistent with the First Law of Thermodynamics, the unity principle and causality is that the universe was created by a self-existent external agent not subject to the laws operational in the universe it created.
The Law of Entropy demands that we view the universe as "devolving" not "evolving." In combination with the First Law of Thermodynamics the Second Law demands that the universe was most complex and orderly when it first came into existence.
www.rae.org /FAQ16.html   (1836 words)

  
 First law of thermodynamics - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The first law of thermodynamics is an expression of the universal law of conservation of energy, and identifies heat transfer as a form of energy transfer.
Defined in this manner, the first law is a generalization of this concept which states for a thermodynamic cycle that the net heat input is equal to the net work output.
In thermodynamics and engineering, it is natural to think of the system as a heat engine which does work on the surroundings, and to state that the total energy added by heating is equal to the sum of the increase in internal energy plus the work done by the system.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/First_law_of_thermodynamics   (1199 words)

  
 Evidence for the supernatural origin of the universe
Thus, the first law of thermodynamics is sometimes called the law of conservation of energy.
Accepting that the first law of thermodynamics is the empirically derived conclusion that energy is conserved and establishes the inability of physical properties to create more energy, the logical deduction is that the origin of the universe is best explained by means of supernatural creation.
Since the universe is winding down and the second law of thermodynamics states that the net usable energy in a closed system cannot be increased by the physical properties of the universe, one is led to the logical conclusion that the initial organized or low entropy state of energy originated supernaturally.
www.uark.edu /~cdm/creation/universeorigin.htm   (1486 words)

  
 The first law of thermodynamics   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-21)
Thermodynamics is the study of systems involving energy in the form of heat and work.
The first law, which deals with changes in the internal energy, thus becomes 0 = Q - W, so Q = W. If the system does work, the energy comes from heat flowing into the system from the reservoir; if work is done on the system, heat flows out of the system to the reservoir.
The first law of thermodynamics is thus reduced to saying that the change in the internal energy of a system undergoing an adiabatic change is equal to -W. Since the internal energy is directly proportional to temperature, the work becomes:
physics.bu.edu /~duffy/py105/Firstlaw.html   (1573 words)

  
 First Law of Thermodynamics
Thermodynamics is a branch of physics which deals with the energy and work of a system.
The first law of thermodynamics allows for many possible states of a system to exist, but only certain states are found to exist in nature.
The implementation of the first law of thermodynamics for gases introduces another useful state variable called the enthalpy which is described on a separate page.
www.grc.nasa.gov /WWW/K-12/airplane/thermo1.html   (569 words)

  
 1st Law of Thermodynamics
Law of Thermodynamics tells us that energy is neither created nor destroyed, thus the energy of the universe is a constant.
Law tells us that once we define a system (remember we can define the system in any way that is convenient) the energy of the system will remain constant unless there heat added or taken away from the system, or some work takes place.
Law equation with the restriction that the only type of work we will consider is done by the expansion/ contraction of a gas (think of the cylinder example).
www.chemistry.ohio-state.edu /~woodward/ch121/ch5_law.htm   (1492 words)

  
 Lesson 13: Temperature, Heat, and the First Law of Thermodynamics
This lesson focuses on the first of two central thermodynamic principles: the conservation of energy, or, as it is sometimes called, the first law of thermodynamics.
Thermodynamic temperature (in kelvins) is one of the seven fundamental quantities on which the International System of Units is based, and it is the key observable property tying together the macroscopic and microscopic approaches to thermodynamics.
The first law of thermodynamics is a quantitative, explicit statement of both energy conservation and the equivalence of work and heat.
www.physics.csbsju.edu /RPEG/no_paper/handouts/Lesson.13.html   (5724 words)

  
 second law of thermodynamics
Thermodynamics literally means "energy in action." It is a word with roots that indicate that it has to do with both heat and motion.
Although the second law of thermodynamics does mean that energy transformations are inefficient in practical terms, and implies that all energy transformations result in lost useful energy, this does not apply to every energy transformation.
The third law of thermodynamics is beyond the scope of this document.
home.earthlink.net /~mflabar/second_law_of_thermodynamics.htm   (2338 words)

  
 Heat and First Law of Thermodynamics
Discuss the implications of the first law of thermodynamics as applied to (a) an isolated system, (b) a cyclic process, (c) an adiabatic process, and (d) an isothermal process.
Many applications of the first law of thermodynamics deal with the work done by (or on) a system which undergoes a change in state.
A thermodynamic system undergoes a process in which its internal energy decreases by 300 J. If at the same time, 120 J of work is done on the system, find the heat transferred to or from the system.
eml.ou.edu /Physics/module/thermal/pasumarthi/firstlaw.html   (2259 words)

  
 Apply the first law thermodynamics.
The first law thermodynamics students learn implies that you can calculate the change in temperature of moving air.
Meteorologists use thermodynamic charts with names such as the skew-T log-P or tephigrams and hodographs to interpret the data.
The two sets of straight lines, one sloping upwards to the right and the other perpendicular set sloping up to the left, form the backbone of this first law thermodynamics tephi (as they are affectionally called).
www.stuffintheair.com /first-law-thermodynamics.html   (852 words)

  
 Conservation of energy and the first law of thermodynamics - from FT Exploring.
Conservation of energy and the first law of thermodynamics - from FT Exploring.
The conservation of energy principle defined by the first law of thermodynamics says that when all of the fuel's energy is released by burning in the engine's cylinders it doesn't disappear.
But as the second law of thermodynamics tells us, there is a limit to how efficient engines can be, and it is not very close to 100%.
www.ftexploring.com /energy/first-law_p2.html   (2474 words)

  
 Untitled Document   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-21)
The first law of thermodynamics is basically the principle of conservation of energy.
Applying the first law requires that we keep track of all forms of energy and make sure that every bit of energy is accounted for.
In thermodynamics, we are looking at a system at two different states of equilibrium and can use the first law to determine the energy exchange in going from one state to another.
www.coolingzone.com /Content/Library/Tutorials/Tutorial3/FirstLaw.html   (743 words)

  
 Conservation of Energy
In rocketry, we are most interested in thermodynamics in the study of propulsion systems and understanding high speed flows.
On some separate slides, we have discussed the state of a static gas, the properties which define the state, and the first law of thermodynamics as applied to any system, in general.
On this slide we derive a useful form of the energy conservation equation for a gas beginning with the first law of thermodynamics.
www.grc.nasa.gov /WWW/K-12/airplane/thermo1f.html   (672 words)

  
 Second Law of Thermodynamics - SkepticWiki   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-21)
While the First Law already indicates that it is impossible to get more work out of an engine than the heat used, the Second Law states that there will always be some waste, and you will always get less work than the equivalent amount of heat.
But most of these variant arrangements fall back to the norm almost at once, by the usual thermodynamic processes of degradation; so that it remains to be explained why they do not all do so, and how instead some complex arrangements establish themselves, and become the base for further complexity in their turn.
The Second Law describes the final equilibrium state of a system; if we are to apply it, as here, to stable states which are far from equilibrium, we must interpret it and formulate it differently.
www.skepticwiki.org /wiki/index.php/Second_Law_of_Thermodynamics   (4406 words)

  
 Johann Bessler - Orffyreus - The First Law   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-21)
Johann Bessler - Orffyreus - The First Law
The impossibility of energy for free is enshrined in one of the most fundamental and important laws of physics: the First Law of Thermodynamics or the Law of Conservation of Energy, which states that energy can neither be created nor destroyed, but can only change its form.
He presented the original formulation of what is now known as the First Law of Thermodynamics, beginning with the axiomatic statement that a Perpetual Motion Machine is impossible.
www.besslerwheel.com /firstlaw.html   (302 words)

  
 Re: The Laws of Thermodynamics
This is evident from the term "thermodynamics": as fluid dynamics examines the movements of fluids, thermodynamics examines the movements of heat (or in a broader sense, energy).
Since the First Law states that the energy of the system is the same after as before the expansion, then there must be a new value, S (entropy), which increased with the loss of heat (Q).
In summary: the First Law says energy is conserved; the Second Law says everything moves toward equilibrium because of something called entropy; and the Third Law says that there is a lowest temperature, called absolute zero, where this entropy stuff is zero.
www.madsci.org /posts/archives/dec96/835000890.Ph.r.html   (610 words)

  
 First law of thermodynamics
Sticking to PdV work for the moment, the first case defines w as "work done by the system;" chemists define w as "work done ON the system." In the first case w is the integral of PdV and positive when volume increases; in the second, w is minus the integral and negative when V increases.
The first case is appropriate historically, and for engineering since interest is in "work" done by a system for a given heat input.
Either way, the first law is consistant: since work and heat are two ways of transferring energy (excluding radiation), the change in energy contained by a system of matter will be the sum of the heat that goes in plus the work done on it.
www.physicsforums.com /showthread.php?p=156707   (830 words)

  
 Conservation of energy & the first law of thermodynamics - physics and energy concepts for students and educators.
Conservation of energy & the first law of thermodynamics - physics and energy concepts for students and educators.
This section is on the First Law of Thermodynamics, or the Conservation of Energy as it is often called.
The First Law of Thermodynamics says the sum of the energy put into the wind turbine plus the remaining energy in the air after it passes through the turbine, must exactly equal the energy in the wind before it entered the turbine.
www.ftexploring.com /energy/first-law.html   (1408 words)

  
 6(e). Laws of Thermodynamics
The first law of thermodynamics is often called the Law of Conservation of Energy.
Because of the second law of thermodynamics both energy and matter in the Universe are becoming less useful as time goes on.
The third law of thermodynamics states that if all the thermal motion of molecules (kinetic energy) could be removed, a state called absolute zero would occur.
www.physicalgeography.net /fundamentals/6e.html   (362 words)

  
 What is a simple defintion of the laws of thermodynamics?
Thermodynamics is the study of the inter-relation between heat, work and internal energy of a system.
Basically, the First Law of Thermodynamics is a statement of the conservation of energy - the Second Law is a statement about the direction of that conservation - and the Third Law is a statement about reaching Absolute Zero (0° K).
The first law, a bellwether in the frontier pastures of Thermodynamics, contained one major flaw that rendered it inaccurate as it stood.
www.physlink.com /Education/AskExperts/ae280.cfm   (1684 words)

  
 Atheism Hits a Brick Wall; The First Law of Thermodynamics
One of the logical outcomes of this law is that there is no new matter or energy appearing anywhere in the universe, nor is there any matter being annihilated.
Consequently, this law is often referred to as the Law of Conservation of Mass and Energy.
The First Law of Thermodynamics is called a "law" because within the bounds of scientific observation it has been proven true beyond all reasonable doubt.
www.ecclesia.org /truth/thermodynamics.html   (1363 words)

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