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Topic: Flying buttress


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noun: In architecture, a flying buttress is a structural feature used to transmit the thrust of a vault across an intervening space, such as an aisle, chapel or cloister, to a buttress built outside the latter.
The employment of the flying buttress meant that the load bearing walls could contain cut-outs, such as for large windows, that would otherwise seriously weaken the vault walls.
You may use Flying Buttress without registering it until you feel that it is worth $25 to you.
personalpages.tds.net /~brian_hill/flyingbuttress.html   (1113 words)

  
  Reference.com/Encyclopedia/Flying buttress
In architecture, a flying buttress, or arc-boutant, is usually on a religious building, used to transmit the thrust of a vault across an intervening space (which might be an aisle, chapel or cloister), to a buttress outside the building.
The employment of the flying buttress means that the load bearing walls can contain cut-outs, such as for large windows, that would otherwise seriously weaken the vault walls.
As a vertical buttress, placed at a distance, possesses greater power of resistance to thrust than if attached to the wall carrying the vault, vertical buttresses as at Lincoln Cathedral and Westminster Abbey were built outside the chapterhouse to receive the thrust.
www.reference.com /browse/wiki/Flying_buttress   (408 words)

  
  flying@Everything2.com   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-28)
Normally fly ropes are attatched to the item to be flown, which are run through pulleys in the roof, and then tie off on the fly gallery.
Flying colors, flags unfurled and waving in the air; hence: To come off with flying colors, to be victorious; to succeed thoroughly in an undertaking.
Flying shot, a shot fired at a moving object, as a bird on the wing.
everything2.com /index.pl?node=flying   (833 words)

  
 Canadian Flying Buttress Lighthouses
Among all Canadian lighthouses, the "flying buttress" towers are perhaps the most striking.
Anderson made the first test of his flying buttress design in 1907 at Cape Norman, in northernmost Newfoundland, on the south side of the entrance to the Strait of Belle Isle.
The flying buttress design was the ultimate development of what Anderson called "ferro-concrete" lighthouse design, a marriage of steel and concrete to produce unusually sturdy towers.
www.unc.edu /~rowlett/lighthouse/types/buttressed.htm   (624 words)

  
 Flying Buttress | World of Invention
A buttress is an arrangement of stone or bricks projecting from the face of a wall to provide it with sideways support.
Flying buttresses are part of the Gothic style of architecture, born in France during the twelfth century.
A.D. Flying buttresses were not only functional, but, as the Gothic architectural style progressed, were often elaborate and majestic when set in rows alongside a cathedral, conveying an image of delicacy.
www.bookrags.com /research/flying-buttress-woi   (363 words)

  
 Flying buttress Summary
In architecture, a flying buttress, or arc-boutant, is a structural feature, usually on a religious building, used to transmit the thrust of a vault across an intervening space (which might be an aisle, chapel or cloister), to a buttress outside the building.
The employment of the flying buttress means that the load bearing walls can contain cut-outs, such as for large windows, that would otherwise seriously weaken the vault walls.
As a vertical buttress, placed at a distance, possesses greater power of resistance to thrust than if attached to the wall carrying the vault, vertical buttresses as at Lincoln Cathedral and Westminster Abbey were built outside the chapterhouse to receive the thrust.
www.bookrags.com /Flying_buttress   (818 words)

  
 Columbia Encyclopedia- buttress - AOL Research & Learn
The Romans employed buttresses, which sometimes projected from the exteriors of the walls and were then left as mere piles of masonry, without architectural treatment.
They devised the flying buttress, an arch of masonry abutting against the wall of the nave; the thrust of the nave vault could thus be received and transferred to the vertical buttress built against the outside walls of the side aisles.
These flying arches, at first concealed beneath the roofs, began to be exposed outside the roofs in the mid-12th cent.
reference.aol.com /columbia/_a/buttress/20051205203909990029   (432 words)

  
 Macworld: Review: Flying Buttress 1.4
Flying Buttress (formerly BrickHouse) is a shareware app that puts a nicer GUI front end on Apple’s built-in firewall and provides access to features otherwise available only through the Terminal command line.
Flying Buttress puts an easy-to-use front end on Apple’s built-in firewall, giving you better access to more of the built-in firewall’s features.
Flying Buttress is a very nice addition to Apple’s built-in firewall, providing easy access to features that would otherwise be unavailable unless you are capable of configuring OS X’s built-in firewall via the Terminal interface.
www.macworld.com /2006/05/reviews/flyingbuttress14/index.php   (0 words)

  
 FLYING BUTTRESS - Online Information article about FLYING BUTTRESS   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-28)
arches were thrown one above the other, and there are cases where the thrust was transmitted to two or even three buttresses across intervening spaces.
Abbey were built outside the chapterhouse to receive the thrust.
All vertical buttresses are, as a See also:
encyclopedia.jrank.org /FLA_FRA/FLYING_BUTTRESS.html   (313 words)

  
 buttress - Search Results - MSN Encarta
Buttress, pile of masonry built up against a wall to strengthen it, especially against lateral pressure, or thrust, from an arch or vault....
A buttress dam consists of a wall, or face, supported by several buttresses on the downstream side.
The vast majority of buttress dams are made of...
encarta.msn.com /buttress.html   (166 words)

  
 Flying Buttresse   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-28)
The purpose of the flying buttress was to help support them from the outside.
If there were no flying buttress, then the walls would begin to lean outwards from the pressure of the vaults and the cathedral would eventually collapse.
To build the flying buttress, it was first necessary to construct temporary wooden frames which are called centering.
library.thinkquest.org /18778/flying.htm   (163 words)

  
 structures - buttress, triangulation, truss, pyramid
A buttress is a thickening of a wall or an outside walls at right angles used to make a wall stronger.
Buttresses counteract the outward force of a heavy roof or wall.
Buttresses are often used to hold a heavy roof or tower.
www.pennridge.org /works/otherstruct.html   (537 words)

  
 Medieval Europe (9th - 15th Century)
The Buttress: Due to the outward thrust generated by the ribs, additional support was usually needed at the pillars to prevent them from "falling out".
The buttress was usually a pillar, pilaster or masonry projecting beyond the wall surface, supporting this outward thrust of the vault.
The Flying Buttress uses the arch to transfer this thrust to a point away from the wall or pillar.
www.suite101.com /article.cfm/building_construction/42986   (408 words)

  
 Brimham - yorkshiregrit.com
In the woods between the Cubic Block and Cleft Buttress (described later) there are dozens of boulders of varying sizes.
This large buttress half-way along the edge is split in two.
On the left-hand buttress, at the entrance to the gully between the two blocks, is this arete, climbed on the left.
www.yorkshiregrit.com /brimham.html   (2692 words)

  
 OS X’s Firewall, And Flying Buttress Firewall Enhancer - OS X Odyssey 853   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-28)
noun: In architecture, a flying buttress is a structural feature used to transmit the thrust of a vault across an intervening space, such as an aisle, chapel or cloister, to a buttress built outside the latter.
The employment of the flying buttress meant that the load bearing walls could contain cut-outs, such as for large windows, that would otherwise seriously weaken the vault walls.
Flying Buttress includes several pre-loaded firewall filter sets for several situations, including a typical, secure set for the average home user, one that allows access to web and ftp servers, and one that allows all access from computers on a home ethernet network and no incoming access via the PPP /Internet connection.
www.applelinks.com /index.php/more/os_xs_firewall_and_flying_buttress_firewall_enhancer_os_x_odyssey_853   (1397 words)

  
 Flying Buttress 1.4 - Mac OS X - VersionTracker   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-28)
As Apple's built-in Firewall preferences has improved in both functionality and security, I have aimed Flying Buttress more at users who need advanced firewall configuration, logging, and IP sharing options.
There is no reason that a new or inexperienced user cannot use Flying Buttress, but Apple's own Firewall preferences will likely remain a simpler interface for configuring a basic firewall.
As always, you may evaluate Flying Buttress without registering as long as you wish.
www.versiontracker.com /dyn/moreinfo/macosx/9103&mode=info   (908 words)

  
 About: Flying Buttress Associates   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-28)
Flying Buttress is a loose association of researchers who work primarily or occasionally in the fields of Modelling, Statistics, Data Analysis, and Data Management.
Since all Flying Buttress researchers have come from other fields, we also represent peer-reviewed publications in mathematical physics, biophysics, and computer science.
Flying Buttress Associates are currently involved in projects funded by the US National Institutes of Health, the Veterans Administration, the Baylor Health Care System, and several research institutions.
home.earthlink.net /~jepherrin/flyingbuttress/about.html   (357 words)

  
 New Frontiers in Science   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-28)
NFS is open to research on a wide range of topics, including: the search for extraterrestrial life, anomalous earth phenomena, new physics, communication with non-human intelligence, the search for extraterrestrial intelligence, unidentified flying objects, prehistoric civilizations, the origin of life, the history of science, and others.
The diamond/arrowhead shape formed by the D&M and the triangular platform adjoining its north-west facet appears to be another nail in the coffin of the Torun geometry.
It seems to me that the north-east buttress may actually have been a later addition to the D&M to feed back into the existing design a new geometry to co-exist with the one it was originally designed with.
newfrontiersinscience.com /letter.shtml   (1889 words)

  
 Macintosh Network Applications Software at The Mac Orchard - Flying Buttress
"Flying Buttress is designed to make using the network firewall built in to Mac OS X quick and easy.
By using Flying Buttress to enable your computer's firewall, you can help prevent unauthorized villains from gaining access to your computer via your internet connection, and from performing network attacks.
Flying Buttress provides a simple and easy interface to setting and activating your firewall's filters.
www.macorchard.com /network/FlyingButtress.php   (419 words)

  
 Flying Buttress 1.4 – Mac OS X – VersionTracker   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-28)
As Apple's built-in Firewall preferences has improved in both functionality and security, I have aimed Flying Buttress more at users who need advanced firewall configuration, logging, and IP sharing options.
There is no reason that a new or inexperienced user cannot use Flying Buttress, but Apple's own Firewall preferences will likely remain a simpler interface for configuring a basic firewall.
As always, you may evaluate Flying Buttress without registering as long as you wish.
versiontracker.com /dyn/moreinfo/macosx/9103   (911 words)

  
 flying buttress definition - Dictionary - MSN Encarta
flying buttress definition - Dictionary - MSN Encarta
Search for "flying buttress" in all of MSN Encarta
support outside cathedral: an exterior support for a wall buttress that sticks out from the wall and is typically arch-shaped, often used in Gothic cathedrals to withstand the outward thrust of the very high walls
encarta.msn.com /encnet/features/dictionary/DictionaryResults.aspx?refid=1861690545   (111 words)

  
 buttress.HTM   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-28)
Windows were sparse and quite small because of the cumbersome masonry therefore entrance into those Romanesque houses of worship would remind one more of some dark, dank cave than it would of the Light of the world.
With the coming of the flying buttress into its own, walls could now climb to unbelievable heights holding enormous vaulted ceilings.
The flying buttress is really an outside "prop" taking the strain and weight of the roof away from the soaring walls.
members.aol.com /GDCSoul/buttress.htm   (310 words)

  
 flying buttress in Belgium on picture   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-28)
Keywords:Ruins, Abbey, convent, monastery, Church, Late gothic, transept, lancet, flying buttress, ogive or ogee arch, lancet arch, tracery, V-tracery, choir, chancel, door, Cisterciƫnzers
Keywords:Statue, Neo-gothic, Scheldt Gothic, spire, crocket, ogive or ogee arch, galery, flying buttress, breastwork, parapet, pillar, open work, bud capital, crocket capital, gargouille, finial, statue (as an ornament), baldachin (canopy), gablet, trilobate, trefoil tracery, vault, buttress, lancet, pinnacle, gilt, tabernacle, cross ribvaulting, diagonal rib vault, clustered column, Louis de Curte, Willem Geefs
Keywords:Church, buttress, lancet, flying buttress, cross ribvaulting, diagonal rib vault, nave, apse, apsis, Twolight window, lancet arch
www.belgiumview.com /etl3/pa000542.php4   (407 words)

  
 Challenging case study – Flying Buttress with Experian
The board of Experian had been going through a period of training and counselling prior to the company’s flotation and they came to Greystoke Castle to develop their communication and team working skills.
The Experian Board undertook our Flying Buttress challenge, in which three teams tackle a full-scale bridge building exercise.
The build team surveys the problem at the bridging site, the resources team collects materials to build the bridge and thus sees the solution, while the design team, who are responsible for producing the build plan, sees neither the problem nor the solution.
www.greystoke.com /development/challenge.html   (0 words)

  
 Gothic Architecture - Clipart ETC
Bell Gable A bell gable is a kind of turret placed on the apex of a gable at the west end of small churches and chapels.
Buttress Pinnacle Buttress pinnacle from Notre Dame, Paris.
Ca d'Oro "The civic buildings of Venice are many of them fine specimens of the same style; of these, one of the richest is the palace called the Ca d'Oro." —D'Anvers, 1895
etc.usf.edu /clipart/galleries/Arts/gothic_architecture.htm   (967 words)

  
 buttress - Search Results - MSN Encarta
Buttress, a mass of stone or brick built up against a wall to strengthen it, especially to counteract lateral pressure, or thrust, from an arch or...
Dam : Types of Dams : Buttress Dams
A buttress dam has an upstream face or deck to support the impounded water, and a series of buttresses or triangular vertical walls built to support...
uk.encarta.msn.com /buttress.html   (163 words)

  
 Gothic Field Guide to Architectural Terms, pg. 2
flying buttress - a buttress arched over at the top to engage with a main wall.
A principal feature of Gothic architecture, lending strength and solidity to the main structure.
gablet - a gable-shaped stone that crowns a buttress.
www.newyorkcarver.com /Glos2.htm   (253 words)

  
 Definition of buttress - Merriam-Webster Online Dictionary
2 : something that resembles a buttress: as a : a projecting part of a mountain or hill b : a horny protuberance on a horse's hoof at the heel -- see
Find more about "buttress" instantly with Live Search
See a map of "buttress" in the Visual Thesaurus
www.m-w.com /dictionary/buttress   (126 words)

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