Factbites
 Where results make sense
About us   |   Why use us?   |   Reviews   |   PR   |   Contact us  

Topic: Fort Clatsop


Related Topics

In the News (Thu 18 Jul 19)

  
 Fort Clatsop -- Facts, Info, and Encyclopedia article   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-22)
The fort was named after the local (additional info and facts about Clatsop) Clatsop tribe of (Any member of the peoples living in North or South America before the Europeans arrived) Native Americans.
The area they had settled in was on the lands of the (additional info and facts about Clatsop) Clatsop tribe, one of the Lower Chinookan peoples.
The original fort decayed in the wet climate of the region but was reconstructed in 1955 from sketches in the journals of (United States explorer who (with Meriwether Lewis) led an expedition from St. Louis to the mouth of the Columbia River; Clark was responsible for making maps of the area (1770-1838)) William Clark.
www.absoluteastronomy.com /encyclopedia/f/fo/fort_clatsop.htm   (345 words)

  
 Fort Clatsop National Memorial (National Park Service)
Fort Clatsop commemorates the 1805-06 winter encampment of the 33-member Lewis and Clark Expedition.
A 1955 community-built replica of the explorers' 50'x50' Fort Clatsop is the focus of the park.
The fort, historic canoe landing, and spring are nestled in the coastal forests and wetlands of the Coast Range as it merges with the Columbia River Estuary.
www.nps.gov /focl   (373 words)

  
 Durand Jones, Fort Clatsop National Memorial Expansion Act, 2643, H. R. 2643
Fort Clatsop National Memorial marks the spot where Lewis and Clark and the Corps of Discovery spent the winter of 1805 - 1806, and is the only unit of the National Park System solely dedicated to the Lewis and Clark expedition.
The historic site of Fort Clatsop was originally preserved and protected by the Oregon Historical Society, and local citizens constructed an exact replica of the fort itself, which had long ago disappeared, except for drawings and descriptions in the journals of Lewis and Clark.
The 1995 General Management Plan for the memorial calls for the establishment of the trail linkage between Fort Clatsop and the Pacific Ocean, and in addition proposes to add sufficient land area to the memorial to provide for the protection of the scenic and natural resources that frame the park setting.
www.doi.gov /ocl/2002/hr2643.htm   (1430 words)

  
 The Seattle Times: Travel Outdoors: Fort Clatsop is Lewis and Clark history headquarters
Fort Clatsop was the turn-around point of the epic and successful 33-member Corps of Discovery voyage to find a river route across the American West to the Pacific Ocean.
Entering the fort's drafty, dark cabins, today's visitors can imagine the daily life of expedition members 200 years ago — struggling to keep fires burning in the relentless rain; bartering with local Indians; and captains Meriwether Lewis and William Clark hunching over rough-hewn tables writing their now-famous journals.
At Fort Clatsop, a 5 percent to 10 percent increase from last year's 256,000 visitors is expected this year, said superintendent Chip Jenkins.
seattletimes.nwsource.com /html/traveloutdoors/2001893080_clatsop04.html   (1392 words)

  
 Congressman David Wu (OR01) - Press Releases - Wu Responds To Fort Clatsop Tragedy
Fort Clatsop is the focal point of the educational experience in the newly established Lewis and Clark National and State Historical Parks.
Fort Clatsop National Memorial, located near Astoria, Oregon, marks the spot where Lewis and Clark and the Corps of Discovery spent 106 days during the winter of 1805 - 1806.
Fort Clatsop is host to one of the nation's five signature Lewis and Clark Bicentennial events.
www.house.gov /apps/list/press/or01_wu/pr10042005fortclatsop.html   (776 words)

  
 SignOnSanDiego.com > News > Nation -- Fort Clatsop burns
The fort is not essential for bicentennial events scheduled for Nov. 11-14, said Cyndi Mudge, one of the organizers.
Fort Clatsop is the centerpiece of the Lewis and Clark National Historical Park, which is among the newest of the nation's 388 national parks and the second one in Oregon.
The 50-by-50-foot fort was built by the local community in 1955 to mark the sesquicentennial of the Lewis and Clark expedition.
www.signonsandiego.com /news/nation/20051004-1615-wst-fortclatsop-fire.html   (701 words)

  
 Fort Clatsop NMem: Lewis and Clark Trail from Fort Clatsop to the Clatsop Plains
Fort Clatsop NMem: Lewis and Clark Trail from Fort Clatsop to the Clatsop Plains
It is reliably reported that Chief Coboway and other Clatsop Indians continued to occupy Fort Clatsop during the hunting season for 10 or 15 years after the expedition's departure.
An American missionary who visited the Fort Clatsop site in that year and who was familiar with the Clatsop Plains vicinity, soon afterwards stated: "The Indians have often pointed out to me the trail by which a gang of their [Lewis and Clark's] men went daily from their hut to the coast." [21]
www.cr.nps.gov /history/online_books/focl/hussey/sectionf.htm   (1294 words)

  
 Congressman David Wu (OR01) - Press Releases - Wu And Baird Call On President To Fund Fort Clatsop Projects
Fort Clatsop National Memorial, located near Astoria, marks the spot where Lewis and Clark and the Corps of Discovery spent 106 days during the winter of 1805 1806.
Fort Clatsop will host one of the nation's 15 signature Lewis and Clark Bicentennial events, and the National Park Service estimates that well over one million people will visit Fort Clatsop during the Bicentennial years.
Specifically, we ask that you fully implement the expansion of Fort Clatsop National Memorial as authorized in Public Law 107-221 and Management Alternative D in the Draft Boundary Study and Environment Assessment for the creation of a Lewis and Clark National and State Historical Park.
www.house.gov /apps/list/press/or01_wu/pr01282004fortclatsop.html   (679 words)

  
 Fort Clatsop NMem: Lewis and Clark Trail from Fort Clatsop to the Clatsop Plains
In the present thinking for the development and interpretation of the Memorial, the immediate vicinity of the fort, including the top and south slope of the ridge on which it sets as far west as the proposed bypass road, would be permitted to revert to natural coniferous forest.
The present logging road which ascends the lower part of the ridge on the approximate route of the Lewis and Clark trail would be vacated by the county as far as the proposed bypass, and its route would be utilized for a re-creation of the Lewis and Clark trail.
As long as the bulk of the property along this road over to the Clatsop Plains remains privately owned, there would be little chance of inducing the county to vacate the section of the road between the monument proper and the sample hemlock forest.
www.cr.nps.gov /history/online_books/focl/hussey/sectioni.htm   (776 words)

  
 Fort Clatsop burns to ground
Fort Clatsop contained a replica of the explorers' winter quarters, based on drawings and descriptions in the journals of William Clark and Meriwether Lewis.
The replica fort was built in 1955 to mark the sesquicentennial of the Lewis and Clark expedition.
Five years after the Lewis and Clark expedition left Fort Clatsop and started for home, fur traders sent by New York financier John Jacob Astor arrived on the coast and built their own fort.
www.casperstartribune.net /articles/2005/10/07/news/regional/1c99caaad8cac61687257090007679a7.txt   (454 words)

  
 A visit to the winter encampment of explorers Lewis and Clark
While not the original fort, it is probably a good reproduction based on William Clark's descripton in his journal.
Nowadays, the fort is only a two-minute walk from a comfy Visitor Center, where you can remain dry while learning what it was like when it was the only non-Native American outpost in the present-day Pacific Northwest.
Fort Clatsop, three miles east of U.S. 101 south of Astoria, is open daily from 8 a.m.
www.outwestnewspaper.com /lewisclark.html   (1135 words)

  
 Fort Clatsop National Memorial, Oregon   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-22)
Fort Clatsop National Memorial is located south of the town of Astoria in northwestern Oregon, near the mouth of the Columbia River.
The original Fort Clatsop, which no longer exists, was built in 1805 by the Lewis and Clark Expedition as their winter quarters after their epic journey west.
From the reconstructed Fort short paths lead to a nearby spring and to the canoe landing on the Lewis and Clark River.
freespace.virgin.net /john.cletheroe/usa_can/natmons/fclatsop.htm   (330 words)

  
 Wildernet - Fort Clatsop National Memorial   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-22)
Attractions - A reconstruction of Fort Clatsop, the shelter used by the Lewis and Clark expedition team, is the focus of this 125-acre park.
Salt obtained from sea water was essential to the explorers' winter at Fort Clatsop and their journey back to the United States in 1806.
Location - The fort, historic canoe landing and spring are nestled in the coastal forests and wetlands of the Coast Range in northwestern Oregon as it merges with the Columbia River Estuary.
www.wildernet.com /pages/area.cfm?areaid=ORFOCL&cu_id=1   (406 words)

  
 Astoria, Ore.: History Bound
Hordes of history buffs are expected to descend on Astoria, mainly to visit the Fort Clatsop National Memorial on the site where Meriwether Lewis, William Clark, and the other 33 members of the Corps of Discovery spent the rainy winter of 1805–06.
Inside the museum are exhibits ranging from ancient dugout canoes built by the Clatsop Indians to a 44-foot U.S. Coast Guard rescue boat used at the "Graveyard of the Pacific," as the treacherous mouth of the Columbia River is sometimes known.
Fort Clatsop National Memorial, across Young's Bay to the southwest, can be reached from downtown Astoria and other coastal towns by shuttle bus.
www.viamagazine.com /top_stories/articles/astoria04.asp   (682 words)

  
 LCArchive.org: Fort Clatsop Archaeological Excavations   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-22)
Although the journals of Lewis and Clark describe the overall size of the fort (50 feet square) and the layout of the rooms, the orientation of the walls with respect to the cardinal directions and the actual site remain a mystery.
It yielded, at a depth of 15" to 18", a pre-1820's cast brass bead, likely manufactured in England, and a piece of lead, flattened on one side and rounded on the other that is suspected to be a musket ball.
Fort Ramon, along the Yellowstone River in Montana: This was the site of a fur-trading company formed by Manuel Lisa and of which both Lewis and Clark were major investors.
www.lcarchive.org /fcexcav.html   (1280 words)

  
 Lewis & Clark Overwinter at Fort Clatsop in 1806
Lewis and Clark Overwinter at Fort Clatsop in 1806
For example, the fort (or "hut" as it is labeled on the map) is shown at the very edge of a slope, which descends toward the river’s flood plain.
The fort’s shape and orientation are also suggested by the small square used to mark the structure.
www.outriderbooks.com /1806.html   (708 words)

  
 LCBO - Fort Clatsop National Memorial   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-22)
Fort Clatsop, on the banks of the Lewis and Clark River, was the winter encampment for The Corps of Discovery from December 1805 to March 1806.
The Fort To Sea Trail is a 6.5 mile trail that runs from Fort Clatsop to Sunset Beach.
The Fort To Sea Trail is a 6.5 mile trail that runs from Fort Clatsop to Sunset Beach on the Pacific Ocean.
www.lcbo.net /fort.htm   (1422 words)

  
 Archaeologists to probe under Fort Clatsop - Boston.com   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-22)
Archaeologists will start probing under the site of the destroyed replica of Fort Clatsop later this month to look for clues to where Lewis and Clark built the original fort 200 years ago.
The ruins of the burned fort will be removed beginning Monday by crews from the Oregon National Guard, the National Park Service and Western Oregon Waste.
Park Superintendent Chip Jenkins says plans are to rebuild the fort where the expedition spent the winter of 1805-1806.
www.boston.com /news/science/articles/2005/10/14/archaeologists_to_probe_under_fort_clatsop   (290 words)

  
 Fort Clatsop, Lewis and Clark, Social Studies, Glencoe
The winter they spent there was miserable: the weather was terrible, raining constantly and sometimes snowing; their bedding was infested with fleas; and everything they owned stayed musty and damp for most of the winter.
Fort Clatsop also proved to be a site filled with interesting plants and animals, descriptions of which Lewis and Clark entered in their journals.
A replica of the fort was built in 1955.
www.glencoe.com /sec/socialstudies/btt/lewis_clark/clatsop.shtml   (246 words)

  
 Bush signs Fort Clatsop expansion measure   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-22)
Fort Clatsop, with its 50-foot-by-50-foot dimensions and cramped quarters, arrives at its current fame after an inauspicious start.
The land used by the Corps of Discovery was eventually cleared for farming, and the first attempt to recognize the fort's existence was nothing more than a crude outline of the building as a means to lure tourists to the area.
"Fort Clatsop and the environment is the crown jewel as far as the western terminus of the expedition," he said.
seattlepi.nwsource.com /local/84561_lewis28.shtml   (448 words)

  
 Lewis and Clark fort replica destroyed - U.S. Life - MSNBC.com
But “half of the fort was burned up, and the other half is essentially a loss,” he said.
The fort, a popular tourist attraction, is the centerpiece of the Lewis and Clark National Historical Park, which is among the newest of the nation’s 388 national parks.
The 50-by-50-foot replica fort was built in 1955 to mark the sesquicentennial of the Lewis and Clark expedition.
www.msnbc.msn.com /id/9590429   (504 words)

  
 14-The Clatsop
Fort Clatsop was named for the closest tribe of Indians — the "La t cap" (meaning "place of dried salmon") — whose nearest village was seven miles away.
Although many Clatsop visited the American fort and were friendly enough, trading, not socializing, was their main reason for coming.
The Americans were also tired and miserable during the long winter at Fort Clatsop, eager to return home and devoting most of their time to finding food and firewood.
www.umsl.edu /~econed/louisiana/Am_Indians/14-The_Clatsop/14-the_clatsop.html   (733 words)

  
 The Seattle Times: Pacific Northwest Magazine
JOHN F. In the 1978 painting by John F. Clymer called "Visitors at Fort Clatsop," Chinook Indians are portrayed as the visitors, bringing food to the Corps of Discovery in the winter of 1805-06.
A JOHN CLYMER print on display at the Fort Clatsop National Memorial near Astoria in Oregon depicts a group of Indians at the gates to the stockade offering fish and other food to Lewis and Clark and their Corps of Discovery.
Fort Clatsop, a tiny stockade only slightly larger than a modern suburban house, was home to the Lewis and Clark expedition during the winter of 1805-06.
seattletimes.nwsource.com /pacificnw/2003/0706/cover.html   (3113 words)

  
 Fort Clatsop National Memorial Astoria, Oregon (National Parks)
It was on a wet Christmas Eve day in 1805 that the explorers of the Lewis & Clark Expedition moved into a stockade fort surrounded by lush old-growth forest, wetlands, and wildlife.
Named in honor of the local Clatsop Indians, the fort was home for the 33-member party for the winter of 1805-1806.
The Fort Clatsop Historical Association was established November 29, 1964 as a non-profit...
www.ohwy.com /or/f/fortclat.htm   (240 words)

  
 ORLCTHF: Fall Council Meeting Report (09/19/98 - Fort Clatsop)   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-22)
The meeting was held in the Netul River Room at the Fort Clatsop Visitors Center and was attended by 35 people from all over Oregon; from as far south as Ashland, as far east as Irrigon and nearby from the Astoria area in the northwest corner of the state.
During the summer of 1999, Fort Clatsop would like to host Dr. Gary Moulton, editor of the Lewis and Clark journals, as he prepares a one-volume abridgment of the journals.
Fort Clatsop is seeking financial support from various sectors to support this endeavor and the Oregon Chapter may desire to undertake a portion of this.
www.lcarchive.org /or091998.html   (1578 words)

  
 Fort Clatsop National Memorial Expansion Act of 2001
To authorize the acquisition of additional lands for inclusion in the Fort Clatsop National Memorial in the State of Oregon, and for other purposes.
(7) Expansion of Fort Clatsop National Memorial requires Federal legislation because the size of the memorial is currently limited by statute to 130 acres.
The sites which should be studied include the Megler Rest Area and Fort Canby State Park with the goal of adding these sites to the Fort Clatsop National Memorial in a fashion that is mutually agreeable to the National Park Service and the States of Washington and Oregon.
www.theorator.com /bills107/hr2643.html   (638 words)

Try your search on: Qwika (all wikis)

Factbites
  About us   |   Why use us?   |   Reviews   |   Press   |   Contact us  
Copyright © 2005-2007 www.factbites.com Usage implies agreement with terms.