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Topic: Frederick III, Elector of Saxony


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  Frederick III, Elector of Saxony - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-21)
Frederick III (January 17, 1463 – May 5, 1525), also known as Frederick the Wise, was Elector of Saxony (from the House of Wettin) from 1486 to his death.
Frederick was the son of Ernest, Elector of Saxony and his wife Elizabeth, daughter of Albert III, Duke of Bavaria.
Frederick was among the princes who pressed the need of reform upon the German king Maximilian I, and in 1500 he became president of the newly-formed council of regency (Reichsregiment).
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Frederick_III,_Elector_of_Saxony   (765 words)

  
 John, Elector of Saxony - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
John, Elector of Saxony, known as John the Steadfast or John the Constant (born 1468 at Schweinitz Castle - August 16, 1532) was Elector of Saxony from 1525 until 1532 (from the House of Wettin).
He was the son of Ernest, Elector of Saxony, and followed his brother Frederick the Wise as ruler.
In 1527 the Lutheran Church was established as the state church in Ernestine Saxony, with the Elector as Chief Bishop.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/John,_Elector_of_Saxony   (241 words)

  
 FREDERICK III. OF SAXONY - LoveToKnow Article on FREDERICK III. OF SAXONY   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-21)
(1463-1525), called the Wise, elector of Saxony, eldest son of Ernest, elector of Saxony, and Elizabeth, daughter of Albert, duke of Bavaria-Munich (d.
Frederick was among the princes who pressed the need of reform upon the German king Maximilian I. ~fl 1495, and in 1500 he became president of the newly-formed council of regency (Reichsregiment).
In 1519, Frederick, who alone among the electors refused to be bribed by the rival candidates for the imperial throne, declined to be a candidate for this high dignity himself, and assisted to secure the election of Charles V. lie died unmarried at Langau, near Annaberg, on the 5th of May 1525.
38.1911encyclopedia.org /F/FR/FREDERICK_III_OF_SAXONY.htm   (288 words)

  
 Search Results for "Saxony"
The dukes of Saxony became electors of the Holy Roman Empire in 1356, and in 1806 the...
...Maurice, duke and elector of Saxony, 1521-53, duke (1541-47) and elector (1547-53) of Saxony.
...Frederick III, elector of Saxony, or Frederick the Wise, 1463-1525, elector of Saxony (1486-1525).
www.bartleby.com /cgi-bin/texis/webinator/sitesearch?FILTER=&query=Saxony   (252 words)

  
 saxony
Son of Frederick II the Gentle, Elector of Saxony; on death of father (1464) succeeded to rule jointly with elder brother Ernest; on division of duchy (1485) received eastern and western portions; governor of Netherlands for Holy Roman emperors (1488-93); governor of Friesland (1498-1500).
FREDERICK AUGUSTUS II (1797-1854), king of Saxony (1836-54), nephew of King Frederick Augustus I and King Anthony (1755-1836), born in Dresden.
Saxe was an illegitimate son of Frederick Augustus I, elector of Saxony (1694-1733) and, as Augustus II, king of Poland (1697-1733).
website.lineone.net /~johnbidmead/saxony.htm   (1914 words)

  
 [No title]   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-21)
Spalatin speedily gained the confidence of the elector, who sent him to Wittenberg in 1511 to act as tutor to his nephews, and procured for him a canon's stall in Altenburg.
He accompanied Frederick to the Diet of Augsburg in 1518, and shared in the negotiations with the papal legates, Cardinal Cajetan and Karl von Miltitz.
During the later portion of his life, from 1526 onwards, he was chiefly engaged in the visitation of churches and schools in electoral Saxony, reporting on the confiscation and application of ecclesiastical revenues, and he was asked to undertake the same work for Albertine Saxony.
encyclopedia.jrank.org /correction/edit?locale=en&content_id=62323   (752 words)

  
 [No title]
Elector Frederick III, later King Frederick I of Prussia, sought a religious compromise first through the introduction of the Anglican liturgy and later by fostering the growth of Halle Pietism, a Lutheran reformist movement led by August Hermann Francke and his mentor Philip Jakob Spener.
Frederick I, however, was pursuing his plan to unite the Lutheran and Reformed churches through the Anglican liturgy instigated during the last years of his reign.
Frederick William was determined to persuade his subjects to identify their self-worth with the positive growth of the Prussia.
www.geocities.com /Athens/Aegean/7023/pietism.html   (4291 words)

  
 brief history of Saxony   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-21)
Saxony then was Lower Saxony, corresponding of the modern German state of that name (capital Hanover).
In 1485 Saxony was divided into the Electorate of Saxony, mainly in Thuringia (central Germany), under Ernest, son of the previous elector, and the Duchy of Saxony (Upper Saxony).
Both Saxony and the Saxon duchies were part of the German Confederation (1815-1866) and then of the North German Confederation (1866-1871), which was annexed by Prussia to found modern Germany.
www.worldhistoryplus.com /s/saxony.html   (829 words)

  
 Frederick III, Elector of Saxony -   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-21)
Frederick III (January 17, 1463 – May 5, 1525), also known as Frederick the Wise, was Elector of Saxony (from the House of Wettin) from 1486 to his death.
Frederick was the son of Ernest, Elector of Saxony and his wife Elizabeth, daughter of Albert, Duke of Bavaria.
Frederick was Pope Leo X's candidate for Holy Roman Emperor in 1519—the pope had awarded him the Golden Rose of virtue on September 3, 1518—, but he helped secure the election of Charles V.
psychcentral.com /psypsych/Frederick_the_Wise   (319 words)

  
 Frederick the Elector (1463-1525)   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-21)
Retaining the government of Saxony in his own hands, he shared the other possessions of his family with his brother John, called 'the Steadfast' (1468-1532).
Frederick was among the princes who pressed the need of reform upon the German king Maximilian I. in 1495, and in 1500 he became president of the newly-formed council of regency (Reichsregiment).
In 1519, Frederick, who alone among the electors refused to be bribed by the rival candidates for the imperial throne, declined to be a candidate for this high dignity himself, and assisted to secure the election of Charles V. He died unmarried at Langau, near Annaberg, on the 5th of May 1525."
www.creeds.net /bios/elector.htm   (225 words)

  
 AUGUSTUS III. (FREDERICK AUGUSTUS II.) - LoveToKnow Article on AUGUSTUS III. (FREDERICK AUGUSTUS II.)   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-21)
ie alliance with Kussia was renewed and in reply Charles pi vaded Saxony in 1706, and compelled the elector to sign the m laty of Altranstdt in September of that year, to recognize ui anislaus Leszczynski as his successor in Poland, and to abandon m e Russian alliance.
When the treaty of Huberts- K rg was concluded in February 1763, he returned to Saxony, tere he died on the 5th of October 1763.
He left five sons, ~ eldest of whom was his successor in Saxony, Frederick iristian; and five daughters, one of whom was the wife of Ei uis, the dauphin of France, and mother of Louis XVI.
5.1911encyclopedia.org /A/AU/AUGUSTUS_III_FREDERICK_AUGUSTUS_II_.htm   (833 words)

  
 Untitled
Seven people had a vote in the election of this so-called emperor: three spiritual or cleric electors (the bishop of Mainz, the bishop of Trier, and the bishop of Köln) and four temporal or lay electors (the king of Bohemia, the count Palatine of the Rhine, the elector of Saxony, and the margrave of Brandenburg).
Frederick opposed the power of the pope and the emperor in Germany and Luther was a threat to both men.
Frederick remained throughout life an adherent of the older faith who was drawn into sympathy with the reformers, likely through his connection with the university of Wittenberg.
www.suite101.com /print_article.cfm/lutheranism/107474   (1115 words)

  
 Saxony   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-21)
From the mid-13th century, the duke of Saxony was recognized as an imperial elector (a prince with the right to participate in choosing the Holy Roman Emperor); a dispute over this right between the two branches was settled in favour of the Wittenberg branch in 1356.
Saxony's monarchy was abolished after Germany's defeat in World War I (1918), and Saxony adopted a republican constitution as a free state under the Weimar Republic (1919–33).
Saxony Land was re-created in 1990 in the process of the unification of East with West Germany.
www.hfac.uh.edu /gbrown/philosophers/leibniz/BritannicaPages/Saxony/Saxony.html   (683 words)

  
 Portrait of Elector Frederick the Wise of Saxony by DÜRER, Albrecht
Frederick III (1463-1525), known as Frederick the Wise, had became Elector of Saxony in 1486 and was one of the princes entitled to select the Holy Roman Emperor.
Frederick the Wise, then 33, is depicted from the waist up, elegantly dressed and set against a light-green background.
Frederick the Wise must have been pleased with this portrait as Dürer was then commissioned to paint a series of important altarpieces for the church at the Elector's palace in Wittenberg.
www.wga.hu /html/d/durer/1/01/08electo.html   (200 words)

  
 Attributed to Lucas Cranach the Elder: Frederick III (1463-1525), the Wise, Elector of Saxony (46.179.1) | Object Page ...   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-21)
Attributed to Lucas Cranach the Elder: Frederick III (1463-1525), the Wise, Elector of Saxony (46.179.1)
Among the strongest defenders of the Reformation movement, Frederick the Wise and John the Steadfast were Lucas Cranach the Elder's patrons at Wittenberg.
The pictures all have the same scheme, the upper two-thirds of the panel occupied by a likeness of the elector, the lower part with a pious eulogistic poem by Martin Luther, printed on paper and pasted onto the surface of the panel.
www.metmuseum.org /toah/hd/refo/hod_46.179.1.htm   (224 words)

  
 Kingdoms of Germany - Saxony
Saxony emerges as one of the more powerful stem duchies in East Francia (kings of Germany), once the formal split is made between East and West Franks.
The title of the duchy of Saxony had passed to the Margraves of Meissen, a march county between the original Saxon lands and Poland.
The newer lands around the Lower Elbe became Lower Saxony, and this is where the name survived until the end of the German Empire.
www.kessler-web.co.uk /History/KingListsEurope/GermanySaxons.htm   (515 words)

  
 Saxony Rulers, Dresden, Germany  -  Travel Photos by Galen R Frysinger, Sheboygan, Wisconsin
Henry III (V) Welf, the Lion Duke Henry XII of Bavaria.
Saxony is divided between Saxe-Lauenberg (in the west) and Saxe-Wittenberg (in the east).
The electorate is elevated to a kingdom by Napoleon Bonaparte on 11th December.
www.galenfrysinger.com /dresden_saxony_rulers.htm   (604 words)

  
 Fredericks
Frederick was a model ruler whose outstanding characteristics were piety (in the Roman Catholic sense) and a deep love of justice.
Frederick's love for his university, coupled with the fact that Luther's presence on the faculty gave the university the prestige that Frederick wanted for it, prompted him to become the protector of the Reformation.
From the Preface to it, which Frederick himself drew up, we learn that Frederick's reasons for it were to have a document which would serve the spiritual welfare of his realm, aid in reaching doctrinal unity among the people, and serve as a guide for preaching and the instruction of the youth.
www.prca.org /books/portraits/freds.htm   (5092 words)

  
 Frederick Augustus I - Search Results - MSN Encarta
Frederick Augustus I, called The Just (1750-1827), first king of Saxony (1806-1827), and, as Frederick Augustus III, elector of Saxony (1763-1806),...
Frederick II of Prussia, however, would not accept any move that would strengthen Austria's power and influence in southern Germany, particularly...
In 1806, Napoleon I, emperor of France, following his victory at Jena in Saxon territory, forced Saxony to join the Confederation of the Rhine....
uk.encarta.msn.com /Frederick_Augustus_I.html   (128 words)

  
 Frederick III, Elector of Saxony (1463-1525) Letter.   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-21)
CITATION: Frederick III, Elector of Saxony, 1463-1525, Letter, MSS 087, Richard C. Kessler Reformation Collection, Archives and Manuscripts Dept., Pitts Theology Library, Emory University.
Retaining the government of Saxony in his own hands, he shared the other possessions of his family with his brother John, called 'the Stedfast' (1468-1532).
The letter is addressed to Samsons Schoffler zu Seyda and Mathes Pustewald and concerns the parish of Neuerdorff, and the death of Rev. Wust.
www.pitts.emory.edu /Archives/text/mss087.html   (312 words)

  
 Frederick III, elector of Saxony
Frederick III or Frederick the Wise,1463–1525, elector of Saxony (1486–1525).
At a crucial period for the early Reformation, Frederick protected Luther from the pope and the emperor, and took him into custody at the Wartburg castle after the Diet of Worms (1521), which put Luther under the imperial ban.
Frederick, however, had little personal contact with Luther and remained a Catholic, although he gradually inclined toward the doctrines of the Reformation.
www.factmonster.com /ce6/people/A0819553.html   (151 words)

  
 Augustus II
Augustus II, King of Poland, and, as Frederick Augustus I, Elector of Saxony, second son of John George III, elector of Saxony, was born at Dresden on the 12th of May 1670.
The alliance with Russia was renewed and in reply Charles invaded Saxony in 1706, and compelled the elector to sign the treaty of Altranstadt in September of that year, to recognize Stanislaus Leszczynski as his successor in Poland, and to abandon the Russian alliance.
He sought to govern Saxony in an absolute fashion, and, in spite of his declaration that his conversion to Roman Catholicism was personal only, assisted the spread of the teachings of Rome.
www.nndb.com /people/606/000097315   (556 words)

  
 boys clothing: German royalty--Saxony
Saxony in 1485 the land was divided between the brothers Albert and Ernst.
In 1697 Augustus the Strong, Elector of Saxony, was crowned King of Poland.
Saxony and other German states still had broad power within the Weimar Republic, but with the NAZIs seizure of power state authority was centraliized.
histclo.com /royal/gers/royal-sax.htm   (849 words)

  
 Christian History & Biography Magazine - CTLibrary.com
Frederick III, Elector of Saxony, was both an avid collector of relics and a supporter of modern scholarship.
He had such rarities (it was claimed) as four hairs from the Virgin Mary, a strand of Jesus’ beard, and a piece of the bread eaten at the Last Supper.
Nevertheless, he refused to suppress Luther, and in 1524 he ended the veneration of relics in Saxony (though he did protest the iconoclasm of Luther’s followers).
www.ctlibrary.com /3882   (509 words)

  
 HISTORY OF THE CHRISTIAN CHURCH*
Frederick was a devout Catholic, a believer in relics and indulgences, but at the same time a lover of fair dealing, an admirer of Luther, and much concerned for his university.
How different was the conduct of Elector Augustus the Strong of Saxony, who sold the Lutheran faith of his ancestors for the crown of Poland (1697), and disgraced both by his scandulous life.
The Elector, the Counts of Mansfeld, and the King of Denmark added small sums to her income; but the unfortunate issue of the Smalkaldian war (1547) disturbed her peace, and drove her from Wittenberg.
www.biblestudyguide.org /history/schaff/7_ch05.htm   (14856 words)

  
 Frederick the Wise on Encyclopedia.com   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-21)
Obituary: Professor Frederick C. Robbins; Joint winner of the Nobel Prize for his work on the poliov...
The paradox of slave mutiny in Herman Melville, Charles Johnson, and Frederick Douglass.(Critical Es...
George A. Buttrick and Frederick Buechner: messengers of reconciling laughter.
www.encyclopedia.com /html/X/X-F1redW1.asp   (213 words)

  
 artists illustrating boys fashions: Lucas Cranach the Elder
Cranach in 1504 went to Wittenberg as court painter to Frederick III (the Wise), Elector of Saxony.
Faithful to the elector John Frederick, who was accused of treason by Emperor Charles V, Cranach followed him during 1550 in his exile at Augsburg, Innsbruck, and Weimar, where he died in 1553.
It was in Saxony during 1517 that he painted a wonderful pair of portatits of a Saxon Prince and Princess.
histclo.com /art/ind/art-cranach.html   (649 words)

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