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Topic: Free speech movement


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  Free Speech Movement: Our unspoken voice... | Bioneers
I think the new free speech movement is about speaking for those whose voices are not heard, those that are marginalized, the forgotten our brothers and sisters in the foreign land, the cry of trees, animals and the Earth.
The movement of free speech does not stop here -it will expand into the larger movement of freeing the voices of all beings on the Earth and there will come a time that all will speak freely and our voice will become the Word once shed light to the darkness.
Freeing speech it is a process of softening the hardened heart, stretching the blood vessels through the actual (e)motion of the heart, melting the iron of a recording machine that freezes the voices, rewinding of the dead voices, its repetition preventing us from moving forward.
www.bioneers.org /node/1152   (2142 words)

  
  Science Fair Projects - Free Speech Movement
The Free Speech Movement was a student protest which began on the campus of the University of California, Berkeley in 1964 under the informal leadership of student Mario Savio and others.
The Free Speech Movement is often cited as a starting point for the many student protest movements of the 1960s and early 1970s.
The FSM was followed in later years first by what some call the "dirty speech movement," which called for freedom to use well known profanity, and then in Spring 1965 the Vietnam Day Committee, a major starting point for the anti-Vietnam war movement.
www.all-science-fair-projects.com /science_fair_projects_encyclopedia/Free_Speech_Movement   (946 words)

  
 FSM Leaflet : The Position of the Free Speech Movement on Speech and Political Activity 1964
Without passing on the propriety of such acts, the Free Speech Movement insists that the question whether their advocacy is legal or illegal must be left to the courts, which are institutionally independent of the shifting pressures of the community.
It is the general position of the Free Speech Movement that those persons and organizations subject to regulations must have a part in their final enactment.
Because of such past experience, and because of the important principle of democratic self-government involved, the Free Speech Movement has taken the position that final regulation of the form of exercise of speech should be by a tripartite committee, consisting of representatives chosen independently by the students, faculty and administration.
www.straw.com /fsm-a/leaflets/FSMposition.html   (1333 words)

  
 Jazz/Jerry Jazz Musician/Free Speech Movement historian Robert Cohen interview.
The Movement was the event that ignited the first clash of generations in a turbulent, historic decade.
Before the Free Speech Movement, the campus that was still trying to recover from the anti-Communist loyalty oath of McCarthyism, which led to the departure of some faculty.
So, while the female activists in the Free Speech Movement now reflect back on how sexist the Movement was, they didn't always have it in their mind at the time because it hadn't been raised until the women's movement of the seventies.
www.jerryjazzmusician.com /linernotes/free_speech_movement.html   (5846 words)

  
 Berkeley Free Speech Movement, 1963-64
The FSM leaders decided to confront the university's Board of Regents, who were scheduled to meet on the campus on November 20.
And it placed the Free Speech Movement at about the point in the spectrum that much of the student left then spoke from: with no suggestion of violence, thinking of concrete change, its discourse as yet unthickened by dogmatic pseudorevolutionary verbiage.
Free Speech supporters came to the meeting in force along with many students sympathetic to the administration's tone of moderation.
www.writing.upenn.edu /~afilreis/50s/berkeley.html   (3655 words)

  
 The Free Speech Movement: Media Resources, University of California Berkeley
Key participants in the Free Speech Movement which occurred at the University of California, Berkeley in 1964 address students on the 30th anniversary of the student movement at the International House concerning their views on the current political situation in the United States.
Key participants in the Free Speech Movement which occurred at the University of California, Berkeley in 1964 address students thirty years later in Sproul Plaza, the sight of the student strike and current sight of the "open forum" for ideological debate at UCB which resulted from the Free Speech Movement.
News coverage of the Free Speech Movement demonstrations and sit-ins at the University of California, Berkeley in 1964.
www.lib.berkeley.edu /MRC/FSM.html   (2782 words)

  
 08.12.2002 - Fresh, behind-the-scenes look at Free Speech Movement in new book by UC Berkeley, NYU professors
The book, to be released to the general public in early October, is a compendium of new articles and memoirs, largely by Free Speech Movement veterans and UC Berkeley faculty members.
During the Free Speech Movement of 1964, a time when the phrase "Don't trust anyone over 30" was popular, Zelnik was a 28-year-old junior faculty member at UC Berkeley.
Key Free Speech Movement leaders, including Mario Savio, were heavily influenced by the Civil Rights Movement, launched as African Americans sought to end segregation in the South.
www.berkeley.edu /news/media/releases/2002/08/12_book.html   (934 words)

  
 Free Speech Movement: Student Protest, U.C. Berkeley, 1964-65
The free speech movement (FSM) at the University of California, Berkeley, in the fall of 1964 was a landmark of 1960s America.
To a student of that era the FSM offers both protracted drama—with mass participation at numerous points and nearly eight hundred arrests in a single sit-in—and a conceptual bridge from the early-sixties civil rights movement to the late-sixties student revolt.
The founders of the Free Speech Movement Archives (FSM-A) see their Web site as part of a still-living history of the FSM, embodied in the recollections and the ongoing lives of its participants.
historymatters.gmu.edu /d/5842   (850 words)

  
 Free Speech Movement Cafe
The historical significance of the FSM, and the student movement to which it gave birth, is that after the FSM universities abandoned the practices of in loco parentis, according to which the university defined its role as substitute parent and students as dependent, not-yet-full-fledged adults.
At its heart "free speech" means that unpopular speech has the same value as that which is popular.
And I speak of the barriers to free expression imposed by racial and gender prejudice.
cio.chance.berkeley.edu /chancellor/sp/fsm.htm   (981 words)

  
 BRIA(16:3) Free Speech Movement, Berkeley, Mahatma Gandhi, British Empire, anti-abortion rescue movement, protest, ...
The Free Speech Movement was the one of the first of the many protests at universities across the country throughout the 1960s.
Free Speech Movement Archives : A spectrum of opinions on what FSM was and what happened to it.
Free Speech Movement Chronology : A chronology tracing events of the "free speech" controversy at Berkeley from Sept. 10, 1964, through Jan. 4, 1965.
www.crf-usa.org /bria/bria16_3.html   (6751 words)

  
 FREE SPEECH MOVEMENT TURNS 40 / UC's change of heart -- celebrating transformation of a pariah into an icon / Weeklong ...
Reviled at birth, the Free Speech Movement is returning under a crown of glory to its UC Berkeley home this week.
The FSM represented not just an extension of the civil rights movement and a fight for free speech on campus but also "an outlet for the feelings of hostility and alienation which so many students have toward the university," Weinberg wrote at the time.
Asked why the FSM changed from pariah to icon, Cohen said UC officials in 1964 had had a "more constricted view of campus free speech rights" conditioned by the Red Scares of the '30s and '50s and a fear that campus leniency with radical activism would jeopardize state funding.
www.sfgate.com /cgi-bin/article.cgi?f=/c/a/2004/10/06/BAGFL93P3R51.DTL   (1570 words)

  
 Looking Back at the Free Speech Movement - 1974 by Michael Rossman
The administrators admire free speech but are not committed to it; they tend to want order and smooth functioning, rather than the chaos of controversy.
But in the FSM, for the first time, members of the privileged and dominant class came en masse to recognize their own oppression at the hands of the institutions that favored them; rebelled on their own behalf; and struggled to develop new institutions to reform the mainstream of their society.
For if the FSM signaled the sudden broadening of a slow revolution in the American mainstream, setting the privileged to work to change the oppressive conditions and consequences of their own lives, this movement has continued to unfold in ways prefigured in the FSM.
www.fsm-a.org /stacks/lookingback(1974).html   (4738 words)

  
 The Free Software Definition - GNU Project - Free Software Foundation (FSF)
Free software is a matter of the users' freedom to run, copy, distribute, study, change and improve the software.
Thus, you should be free to redistribute copies, either with or without modifications, either gratis or charging a fee for distribution, to anyone anywhere.
Software manuals must be free, for the same reasons that software must be free, and because the manuals are in effect part of the software.
www.gnu.org /philosophy/free-sw.html   (1487 words)

  
 Free Speech Movement and the Mississippi Sovereignty Commission
Since the Civil Rights Movement arose in the South when the Cold War and its crusade against domestic Communism was in full swing, Southern segregationists were particularly anxious to hang the Communist albatross around the movement's neck.
I was active in the Free Speech Movement as the representative of the University Young Democrats.
But she was the only CP member in the FSM leadership; even the FBI acknowledged that barely a "handful" of Communists were involved in the FSM at all levels.
www.jofreeman.com /sixtiesprotest/FSMMiss.htm   (4005 words)

  
 Protests and Social Movements of the 60s
The Free Speech Movement was stemmed from the need for change and rebellion from society that many young adults felt during the 60s.
The youth that took part in the free speech movement mainly wanted to change society rather than separate themselves from it as the hippies wanted to.
The Free Speech Movement had its origins on the University of California, Berkeley campus where they fought to regain their right to protest on campus.
www-rohan.sdsu.edu /~cerna/freespeechmovement.htm   (461 words)

  
 America's Anti-Free Speech Movement
Back in 1964, it was Mario Savio a campus leftist who led the Free Speech Movement at the Berkeley campus of the University of California, a movement that without question played a vital role in placing American universities center stage in the flow of political ideas no matter how controversial, unpatriotic and vulgar.
.the two designated areas for free speech and assembly will be the amphitheater area of the Mountainlair plaza and the concrete stage area in front of the Mountainlair and adjacent to the WVU Bookstore." In other words, 99 percent of West Virginia's campus was made into a censorship zone.
Attacks on free speech in order to accommodate multiculturalism and diversity is really an attack on Western values that the university "enlightened" consider morally equivalent at best to other values.
www.gmu.edu /departments/economics/wew/articles/fee/speech.html   (710 words)

  
 A New Free Speech Movement, Starting With Alumni - December 8, 2004 - The New York Sun
Forty years ago, in the fall of 1964, when I was in school at the University of Pennsylvania, something happened on the opposite end of the country that affects all of us to this day.
That something was erroneously called the Berkeley Free Speech Movement - one of the great misnomers of all time - and it swept over campuses across America.
Though this movement disappeared from the headlines and feels as out of date today as the clothing and hairstyles of the 1960s, its impact is still with us and as strong as ever.
www.nysun.com /article/5959   (913 words)

  
 EPIC Archive - Free Speech
California, obscenity is speech that (1) the average person, applying contemporary community standards, would find, taken as a whole, to appeal to the prurient interest; (2) depicts or describes in a patently offensive manner specifically defined sexual conduct; and (3) lacks as a whole serious literary, artistic, political or scientific value.
Speech likely to provoke an average listener to retaliation, and thereby cause a breach of peace, falls outside the protection of the First Amendment because the words have no important role in the marketplace of ideas the freedom of speech is designed to promote.
Commercial speech, which was warranted no protection by the Court until 1980 in Central Hudson Gas and Electric, is now protected under an intermediate level of scrutiny because the motivation to market goods and services is believed sufficient to overcome any chill caused by government regulation.
www.epic.org /free_speech   (5051 words)

  
 A New Free Speech Movement, Starting With Alumni - Campus Watch
Forty years ago, in the fall of 1964, when I was in school at the University of Pennsylvania, something happened on the opposite end of the country that affects all of us to this day.
That something was erroneously called the Berkeley Free Speech Movement - one of the great misnomers of all time - and it swept over campuses across America.
Though this movement disappeared from the headlines and feels as out of date today as the clothing and hairstyles of the 1960s, its impact is still with us and as strong as ever.
www.campus-watch.org /article/id/1421   (1266 words)

  
 CNN.com - Professor recalls pros, cons of Free Speech Movement - Jan. 9, 2004   (Site not responding. Last check: )
The Free Speech Movement that began in Berkeley in 1964 is credited with inspiring the vast number of anti-Vietnam war protests in the '60s.
One person who was at the center of the Free Speech Movement is still a professor at the University of California at Berkeley -- where the movement got its start.
There was only free speech for certain approved views and speakers who didn't hold the approved views would have been disrupted or shouted down or otherwise would have created a riot.
cnn.com /2004/ALLPOLITICS/01/09/cnna.searle/index.html   (1417 words)

  
 SignOnSanDiego.com > News > State -- Berkeley celebrates 40th anniversary of Free Speech Movement
BERKELEY – Forty years ago, Free Speech Movement protesters at the University of California, Berkeley, were hauled off in handcuffs.
The Free Speech Movement began in October 1964 when police arrested graduate student Jack Weinberg for handing out leaflets about civil rights in violation of a campus ban on political activities.
The Free Speech Movement culminated on Dec. 2, 1964, when 1,000 students marched into Sproul Hall for a sit-in and nearly 800 were arrested.
www.signonsandiego.com /news/state/20041008-1536-wst-freespeechat40.html   (689 words)

  
 Berkeley protests made history - sacbee.com   (Site not responding. Last check: )
It commemorates the Free Speech Movement and the nearby People's Park, both brought into the national consciousness in the 1960s.
It wasn't long before the UC Berkeley administration voted to ditch its stand on restricting free speech on campus.
Part of the mural commemorates one of the Free Speech Movement's founders, political activist Mario Savio, who died in 1996.
www.sacbee.com /643/v-print/story/89191.html   (385 words)

  
 EPIC Archive - Free Speech
California, obscenity is speech that (1) the average person, applying contemporary community standards, would find, taken as a whole, to appeal to the prurient interest; (2) depicts or describes in a patently offensive manner specifically defined sexual conduct; and (3) lacks as a whole serious literary, artistic, political or scientific value.
Speech likely to provoke an average listener to retaliation, and thereby cause a breach of peace, falls outside the protection of the First Amendment because the words have no important role in the marketplace of ideas the freedom of speech is designed to promote.
Commercial speech, which was warranted no protection by the Court until 1980 in Central Hudson Gas and Electric, is now protected under an intermediate level of scrutiny because the motivation to market goods and services is believed sufficient to overcome any chill caused by government regulation.
epic.org /free_speech   (5051 words)

  
 Democracy Now! | The Free Speech Movement: Reflections on Berkeley in the 1960s
We hear an excerpt of one the Free Speech Movement’s leading voices, the late Mario Savio speaking in 1964, and talk to his widow Lynne Hollander as well as Michael Rossman.
The reason for the change attested to the continuing impact of student activism unleashed by the Free Speech Movement of 1964, known as FSM, the director of public ceremonies, the faculty member summed up the problem in a memo to the chancellor.
This was the first time that students had gone to the wall anywhere in the country to defend free speech and it opened the doors afterwards immediately the following spring, we began to organize the first mass anti-war movement in the country.
www.democracynow.org /article.pl?sid=03/11/21/1524217   (2561 words)

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