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Topic: French Revolution from the abolition of feudalism to the Civil Constitution of the Clergy


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In the News (Tue 19 Feb 19)

  
  French Revolution
The French Revolution (1789 - 1799) was a pivotal period in the history of France and Europe.
The Civil Constitution Of The Clergy, passed on July 12, 1790 (although not signed by king David until December 26, 1790), turned the remaining clergy into employees of the State and required that they take an oath of loyalty to the constitution.
In response to this legislation, the archbishop of Aix and the bishop of Clermont led a walkout of clergy from the National Constituent Assembly.
www.seattleluxury.com /encyclopedia/entry/French_revolution   (5046 words)

  
  French Revolution from the abolition of feudalism to the Civil Constitution of the Clergy - Wikipedia, the free ...
The French Revolution was a period in the history of France covering the years 1789 to 1799, in which republicans overthrew the Bourbon monarchy and the Roman Catholic Church perforce underwent radical restructuring.
The Civil Constitution of the Clergy, passed on July 12, 1790 (although not signed by the king until December 26, 1790), turned the remaining clergy into employees of the State and required that they take an oath of loyalty to the constitution.
In response to this legislation, the archbishop of Aix and the bishop of Clermont led a walkout of clergy from the National Constituent Assembly.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/French_Revolution_from_the_abolition_of_feudalism_to_the_Civil_Constitution_of_the_Clergy   (2318 words)

  
 French Constitution of 1791 - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The short-lived French Constitution of 1791, adopted by the National Constituent Assembly during the period now known as the French Revolution, went into effect in September 1791 but, due to a series of constitutional crises, had effectively ceased to function as a national constitution by August 1792.
The constitution dissolved in a chaos of forces, with the radical and even terroristic Paris Commune, the municipal government of Paris, holding the balance of power in the country until the beginning of the Convention on October 1, 1792.
For provisions of this constitution, see the discussions of constitutional issues in French Revolution from the abolition of feudalism to the Civil Constitution of the Clergy and French Revolution from the summer of 1790 to the establishment of the Legislative Assembly.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/French_Constitution_of_1791   (314 words)

  
 French Revolution - Encyclopedia, History, Geography and Biography
The French Revolution (1789–1799) was a pivotal period in the history of French, European and Western civilization.
The slogan of the French Revolution was "Liberté, égalité, fraternité, ou la mort!" ("Liberty, equality, fraternity, or death!").
From a fiscal perspective, the solvency of the French crown was equivalent to the solvency of the French state.
www.arikah.com /encyclopedia/French_Revolution   (4770 words)

  
 French Revolution
The period of the French Revolution in the history of France covers the years between 1789 and 1799, in which republicanss overthrew the monarchy and the Roman Catholic Church perforce underwent radical restructuring.
The Civil Constitution of the Clergy, passed on July 12, 1790 (although not signed by the king until December 26, 1790), turned the remaining clergy into employees of the State and required that they take an oath of loyalty to the constitution.
The French people were in no temper to be dictated to by foreign monarchs, and the threat of force merely resulted in the militarization of the frontiers.
www.starrepublic.org /encyclopedia/wikipedia/f/fr/french_revolution_1.html   (3993 words)

  
 French Revolution from the summer of 1790 to the establishment of the Legislative Assembly   (Site not responding. Last check: )
French Revolution from the summer of 1790 to the establishment of the Legislative Assembly
This article is a continuation of French Revolution from the abolition of feudalism to the Civil Constitution of the Clergy.
The French people were in no temper to be dictated to by foreign monarchs, and the threat of force merely resulted in the militarization of the frontiers.
hallencyclopedia.com /French_Revolution_from_the_summer_of_1790_to_the_establishment_of_the_Legislative_Assembly   (2226 words)

  
 French Revolution - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Meanwhile, on 24 June, the Convention adopted the first republican constitution of France, variously referred to as the French Constitution of 1793 or Constitution of the Year I. It was ratified by public referendum, but never applied, because normal legal processes were suspended before it could take effect.
The constitutional party in the legislature desired toleration of the nonjuring clergy, the repeal of the laws against the relatives of the émigrés, and some merciful discrimination toward the émigrés themselves.
The Parisian Sans-Culottes and the French Revolution, 1793-4.
www.adorons.com /wiki/French_Revolution   (7325 words)

  
 French Revolution   (Site not responding. Last check: )
The period of the French Revolution in the history of France covers the years between 1789 and 1799, in which republicanss overthrew the monarchy and the Roman Catholic Church perforce underwent radical restructuring.
As the revolution proceeded and as power devolved from the monarchy to legislative bodies, the conflicting interests of these initially allied groups would become the source of conflict and bloodshed.
The pope never accepted the new arrangement, and it led to a schism between those clergy who swore the required oath and accepted the new arrangement ("jurors" or "constitutional clergy") and the "non-jurors" or "refractory priests" who refused to do so.
www.1-free-software.com /en/wikipedia/f/fr/french_revolution_1.html   (3993 words)

  
 French Revolution from the abolition of feudalism to the Civil Constitution of the Clergy: Encyclopedia topic   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Mirabeau (Mirabeau: French revolutionary who was prominent in the early days of the French Revolution (1749-1791)) now led the move to address this matter, with the Assembly giving Necker complete financial dictatorship.
Talleyrand (Talleyrand: French statesman (1754-1838)), bishop of Autun (Autun: autun is a town in the saône-et-loire département in burgundy, france....
The Civil Constitution of the Clergy (Civil Constitution of the Clergy: the law of the civil constitution of the clergy (fr....
www.absoluteastronomy.com /reference/french_revolution_from_the_abolition_of_feudalism_to_the_civil_constitution_of_the_clergy   (2992 words)

  
 Revolution
Hence the conventional term "Revolution of 1789," denoting the end of the ancien régime in France and serving also to distinguish that event from the later French revolutions of 1830 and 1848.
The National Constituent Assembly completed the abolition of feudalism, suppressed the old "orders," established civil equality (at least in metropolitan France, since slavery was retained in the colonies), and assured equality of rights insofar as eligibility to public office was concerned.
Having deprived the church of its resources, the Assembly then resolved to reorganize the church, enacting the Civil Constitution of the Clergy, which was rejected by the pope and by the majority of the French clergy.
ftp.ccccd.edu /andrade/worldlitII2333/Revolution.html   (971 words)

  
 National Constituent Assembly   (Site not responding. Last check: )
The National Constituent Assembly (French: Assemblée nationale constituante) was formed from the National Assembly on July 9, 1789, during the first stages of the French Revolution.
Following attempts by King Louis XVI and the Second Estate to prevent the delegates from meeting, the new assembly was forced to relocate to a tennis court on June 20; there, it swore the Tennis Court Oath, promising to draft a new constitution for France.
The "National Party," at this time still relatively united in support of revolution and democratization, representing mainly the interests of the middle classes, but strongly sympathetic to the broader range of the common people.
hallencyclopedia.com /National_Constituent_Assembly   (955 words)

  
 National Constituent Assembly Online Research :: Information about National Constituent Assembly   (Site not responding. Last check: )
National Constituent Assembly (1, French Revolution from the abolition of feudalism to the Civil Constitution of the Clergy, French Revolution from the summer of 1790 to the establishment of the Legislative Assembly)
The National Constituent Assembly (French language : Assemblée nationale constituante) was formed from the National Assembly (French Revolution) on July 9, 1789, during the first stages of the French Revolution.
On June 17 the Communes declared themselves the National Assembly (French Revolution) by a vote of 490 to 90.
www.ncweddingplanner.com /search/National_Constituent_Assembly.html   (894 words)

  
 Feudalism Aquire Compelling Factual Good Judgment On The Topic Of Feudalism
Feudalism Feudalism, or sometimes called the feudal system, in the present-day study of medieval history, often describes a legal and administrative order founded upon the exchange of reciprocal...
Feudalism Feudalism was the medieval model of government predating the birth of the modern nation-state.
Lecture 21 Feudalism and the Feudal Relationship In the wake of Charlemagne's death, the...
horseslife.ileahorses.com /feudalism   (952 words)

  
 French Revolution - Haiti
Template:French Revolution The period of the French Revolution is very important in the history of France and the world.
Legislation enacted in 1790 included the abolition of the Church's authority to levy a tax on crops known as the "dîme," the cancellation of special privileges for the clergy, and the confiscation of Church property, the then largest landowner in the country.
The Concordat of 1801 between the National Assembly and the Church ended the dechristianisation period and established the rules for a relationship between the Catholic Church and the French State that lasted until it was abrogated by the Third Republic on the separation of church and state on December 11, 1905.
haiti.wikia.com /wiki/French_Revolution   (4961 words)

  
 French Revolution up to the Storming of the Bastille
This article covers the earliest period of the revolution, from the meeting of the Estates-General (May 5, 1789) to the storming of the Bastille (July 14, 1789) and its immediate aftermath down to July 27, 1789.
However, with the etiquette of 1614 strictly enforced, the clergy and nobility in their full regalia, and the physical locations of the deputies from the three estates dictated by the protocol of an earlier era, an immediate impression emerged that less had, in fact, been achieved.
Those of the clergy who had joined the Assembly at the church of Saint Louis remained in the Assembly; forty-seven members of the nobility, including the duke of Orléans, soon joined them; by June 27, the royal party had overtly given in, although the likelihood of a military counter-coup remained in the air.
www.bonjourlafrance.net /france-history/french-revolution-up-to-the-storming-of-the-bastille.htm   (2617 words)

  
 Revolution, The French   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Before the outbreak of the Revolution, it was generally believed in the higher circles of French society, that the clergy, as a privileged class, would make common cause with the nobility; but this supposition was rudely shaken at the very opening of the contest.
The inmates of the monasteries were allowed to return to civil life by a simple announcement to the nearest secular authority; and according to the character of their monastic vows, the circumstances of their monastery, their age, etc., they received a pension of from seven hundred to twelve hundred francs.
A law of Sept. 20, 1792, defined marriage as a merely civil contract, dissolvable by common consent, and transferred the registration of births, deaths, and marriages, from the ecclesiastical to the civil authorities.
www.dabar.org /Religion/RED/R-Words/Redrevolution.htm   (2009 words)

  
 Reference.com/Encyclopedia/French Revolution from the summer of 1790 to the establishment of the Legislative Assembly
Reference.com/Encyclopedia/French Revolution from the summer of 1790 to the establishment of the Legislative Assembly
Mirabeau carried the day against the measure, which he referred to as "worthy of being placed in the code of Draco." http://www.outfo.org/literature/pg/etext06/8hfrr10.txt However, before the end of the year, the new French Legislative Assembly would adopt this "draconian" measure.
In this constitution the people was the source of all powers, but it exercised none; it was entrusted only with election in the first instance, and its magistrates were selected by men chosen from among the enlightened portions of the community." http://www.outfo.org/literature/pg/etext06/8hfrr10.txt
www.reference.com /browse/wiki/French_Revolution_from_the_summer_of_1790_to_the_establishment_of_the_Legislative_Assembly   (1941 words)

  
 The French Revolution
The French Revolution (1789-99) violently transformed France from a monarchical state with a rigid social hierarchy into a modern nation in which the social structure was loosened and power passed increasingly to the middle classes.
Born of this second revolution and briefly favored by military victory, the National Convention horrified Europe by establishing a republic (Sept. 22, 1792), inaugurating a policy of revolutionary war, and sending the king to the guillotine on Jan. 21, 1793.
The Montagnard Convention then had to contend with invasion, royalist civil war, and widespread provincial revolts against "the dictatorship of Paris." Initially, Georges Danton tried to placate the provinces, and the democratic Constitution of 1793 was approved by plebiscite and celebrated at a Festival of Unity (August 10).
www.discoverfrance.net /France/History/DF_revolution.shtml   (2636 words)

  
 French Revolution - Gurupedia
The French Revolution, as a period in the
The Civil Constitution of the Clergy, passed on July 12, 1790 (although not signed by the king until
December 26, 1790), turned the remaining clergy into employees of the State and required that they take an oath of loyalty to the constitution.
www.gurupedia.com /f/fr/french_revolution.htm   (3569 words)

  
 French Revolution - TCP Poetry Wiki   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Template:French Revolution During the French Revolution (1789-1799) democracy and republicanism replaced the absolute monarchy in France, and the French sector of the Roman Catholic Church was forced to undergo radical restructuring.
The Concordat of 1801 between Napoleon and the Church ended the dechristianisation period and established the rules for a relationship between the Catholic Church and the French State that lasted until it was abrogated by the Third Republic on the separation of church and state on December 11, 1905.
The Civil Constitution of the Clergy also made the Catholic church an arm of the secular state.
www.criticalpoet.com /mediawiki/index.php/French_Revolution   (5044 words)

  
 French Constitution of 1791 - TheBestLinks.com - Constitutional monarchy, France, French Revolution, Liberal, ...
French Constitution of 1791 - TheBestLinks.com - Constitutional monarchy, France, French Revolution, Liberal,...
French Constitution of 1791, Constitution, Constitutional monarchy, France...
After the final fall of Napoleon, the Treaty of Paris (1815) signed by the Allied powers, though not by defeated France, optimistically mentioned "restoring the operation of the Constitutional Charter, the order of things which had been happily re-established in France"— but the provisions of the Constitution of 1791 were rapidly abrogated under the Restauration.
www.thebestlinks.com /French_Constitution_of_1791.html   (337 words)

  
 Position Statements   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Of all groups in French society, the nobility bore the greatest responsibility for the outbreak of revolution in 1789.
The most important legacy of the French Revolution was not in the area of political rights, but in guaranteeing the economic rights of individual private property and freedom of contract.
The course of the Revolution was dictated mainly by events in Paris, with the rest of the country either looking on or actively hostile to the various revolutionary governments.
www.longwood.edu /staff/munsonjr/frev02/frevpos02.html   (1021 words)

  
 LECTURE VI
As you read the TB's brief narratives of the American and French revolutions, try to keep in mind the long-term influences as well as the events and people who are part of the stories.
The colonists argued that the stamp was a tax and that it was a constitutional right of Englishmen not to be taxed without their consent.
Civil Constitution of the Clergy, 1790, moves to secularize the Church.
academic.brooklyn.cuny.edu /history/dfg/core/c4-vi.htm   (1192 words)

  
 parlements
The causes of the French Revolution, the uprising which brought the regime of King Louis XVI to an end, were manifold.
During the French Revolution (1789-1799) democracy and republicanism replaced the absolute monarchy in France, and the French sector of the Roman Catholic Church was forced to undergo radical restructuring.
The Académie française was established in 1635 to act as the official authority on the usages, vocabulary, and grammar of the French language, and to publish an official dictionary of the French lang...
www.experiencefestival.com /parlements   (2551 words)

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