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Topic: French coup of 1851


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In the News (Sat 25 May 19)

  
 Coup d'état - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
An example is Alberto Fujimori in Peru, who was democratically elected, but later took control of the legislative and judicial powers, or the coup of French President Louis Napoléon Bonaparte in 1851 against the powerful National Assembly.
Veto coups and guardian coups tend to be led by senior officers.
In cases where the coup is led by junior officers or enlisted men, the coup is also a mutiny which can have grave implications for the organizational structure of the military.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Coup   (2307 words)

  
 Coup d'état - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
An example is Alberto Fujimori in Peru, who was democratically elected, but later took control of the legislative and judicial powers, or the coup of French President Louis Napoléon Bonaparte in 1851 against the powerful National Assembly.
In cases where the coup is led by junior officers or enlisted men, the coup is also a mutiny which can have grave implications for the organizational structure of the military.
Since the unsuccessful coup attempts of Wolfgang Kapp in 1920, and of Adolf Hitler in 1923, the German word "Putsch" is often used also, even in France (such as the putsch of November 8, 1942 and the putsch of April 21, 1961, both in Algiers).
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Coup   (2142 words)

  
 ranks.txt
Louis-Napoleon Bonaparte, president of the French Republic, instigated a coup on Dec. 2, 1851 and had himself proclaimed Emperor in 1852; he abdicated in 1870 consequent to France's defeat in the Franco-Prussian War.
In French usage, Prince Albert of Monaco, as heir to Prince Rainier, is a "prince-heredetaire", and Prince Alois, the heir of Hans-Adam of Liechtenstein is, in German usage, an "Erbprinz".
Old English lacked a feminine and thus the French term was adopted for an earl's wife as well as for women who hold earldoms in their own right.
www.geocities.com /sylfyre/ranks.txt   (6796 words)

  
 Coup d'état - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
An example is Alberto Fujimori in Peru, who was democratically elected, but later took control of the legislative and judicial powers, or the coup of French President Louis Napoléon Bonaparte in 1851 against the powerful National Assembly.
1926 : Coup of Jozef Pilsudski in Poland
In cases where the coup is led by junior officers or enlisted men, the coup is also a mutiny which can have grave implications for the organizational structure of the military.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Coup   (6796 words)

  
 Coup d'état - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
An example is Alberto Fujimori in Peru, who was democratically elected, but later took control of the legislative and judicial powers, or the coup of French President Louis Napoléon Bonaparte in 1851 against the powerful National Assembly.
In cases where the coup is led by junior officers or enlisted men, the coup is also a mutiny which can have grave implications for the organizational structure of the military.
Since the unsuccessful coup attempts of Wolfgang Kapp in 1920, and of Adolf Hitler in 1923, the German word "Putsch" is often used also, even in France (such as the putsch of November 8, 1942 and the putsch of April 21, 1961, both in Algiers).
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Coup   (6796 words)

  
 The Eighteenth Brumaire of Louis Bonaparte - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The pamphlet shows Marx in his form as a social and political historian, treating actual historical events—those leading up to Louis Bonaparte 's December 2, 1851 coup d'etat —from the viewpoint of his materialist conception of history.
The " Eighteenth Brumaire " refers to November 9, 1799 in the French Revolutionary Calendar —the day Louis Bonaparte's uncle Napoleon Bonaparte had made himself dictator by a coup d'etat.
The The Eighteenth Brumaire of Louis Napoleon was written by Karl Marx between December 1851 and March 1852, and originally published in 1852 in Die Revolution, a German-language monthly magazine published in New York and established by Joseph Weydemeyer.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/The_Eighteenth_Brumaire_of_Louis_Bonaparte   (6796 words)

  
 Oudinot, Nicolas-Charles, Duke De Reggio --  Encyclopædia Britannica
French political and social leader during the Second Empire who played an important part in the coup d'état of Dec. 12, 1851, which eventually led to the establishment of Charles Louis-Napoléon Bonaparte, Morny's half brother, as Emperor Napoleon III.
Biography of Charles Andre Joseph Marie de Gaulle, the French nationalist and statesman who led his country during World War II and became the president of fifth republic of France.
Biography of this French physicist best known for the formulation of Coulomb's law, which states that the force between two electrical charges is proportional to the product of the charges and inversely proportional to the square of the distance between them.
www.britannica.com /eb/article-9057709?tocId=9057709&query=charles-nicolas   (828 words)

  
 Thiers Adolphe: Free Encyclopedia Articles at Questia.com Online Library
Thiers supported Louis Napoleon Bonaparte (later Emperor Napoleon III) for president of the French republic, but his opposition to Bonaparte's coup in Dec., 1851, led to his arrest and exile.
THIERS, ADOLPHE adolf tyer, 1797 1877, French statesman...After studying law at Aix-en-Provence, Thiers went (1821) to Paris and joined the group...reactionary government of King Charles X.
Thiers held ministerial posts under Louis Philippe, whose candidacy as king of the French he had promoted.
www.questia.com /library/encyclopedia/thiers-adolphe.jsp?l=T&p=2   (1694 words)

  
 europenobletitle
Louis-Napoleon Bonaparte, president of the French Republic, instigated a coup on Dec. 2, 1851 and had himself proclaimed Emperor in 1852; he abdicated in 1870 consequent to France's defeat in the Franco-Prussian War.
He is counted as King Charles I of France and as Holy Roman Emperor Charles (or Karl) I. Napoleon I was vested with "the imperial dignity" by a law of the French Senate in May 1804.
The power of the Holy Roman Emperor was limited and the nobles who putatively owed him allegiance were oftentimes sovereign in all but name, particularly in the latter stages of the Empire.
worldroots.com /~brigitte/europenobletitle.htm   (7234 words)

  
 The 18th Brumaire of Louis Napoleon
On December 2, 1851, Louis Napoleon overthrew the French Second Republic and established himself as emperor of France.
" The 18th Brumaire " refers to November 9, 1799 in the French Revolutionary Calendar -- the day of the coup d'etat that had brought Napoleon Bonaparte to power as First Consul.
The work, written between December 1851 and February 1852, begins with one of Marx's most famous remarks: " Hegel remarks somewhere that all great world-historic facts and personages appear, so to speak, twice.
www.calsky.com /lexikon/en/txt/t/th/the_18th_brumaire_of_louis_napoleon_1.php   (7234 words)

  
 Mayer (1979) The Impact of the 18th Brumaire
of Frantz's Masse oder Volk, Louis Napoleon, published by A. Protte, Potsdam; Bagehot's Letters on the French coup d'état of 1851, excerpted from the 1895 ed.
France; History; Coup d'état, 1851; February Revolution, 1848; Second Republic, 1848-1852; Napoleon; Frantz, Gustav Adolph Constantin
Mayer (1979) The Impact of the 18th Brumaire
www.getcited.org /pub/101889821   (7234 words)

  
 French Political History, 1815 - 2000
of Brumaire] 1799: Coup d'état by Napoleon Bonaparte
December 2, 1851: Louis Bonaparte's coup d'état against republic, described by Marx as "18
December 1848: Election of Louis Bonaparte as President of 2
www.unlv.edu /faculty/gbrown/hist362/resources/chrono.htm   (7234 words)

  
 Definition of The Eighteenth Brumaire of Louis Bonaparte
The Eighteenth Brumaire of Louis Napoleon is Karl Marx 's analysis of Napoleon Bonaparte III 's coup d'etat of December 1851, in which he elucidates the social forces and mechanisms at work during the political crisis.
The "eighteenth Brumaire " ( 18 Brumaire) refers to the 9th November, 1799 in the French Revolutionary Calendar (or French Republican Calendar), which was the day Louis Napoleon Bonaparte staged his coup d'etat.
Later editions (such as a 1869 Hamburg edition) were entitled The Eighteenth Brumaire of Louis Bonaparte.
www.wordiq.com /definition/The_Eighteenth_Brumaire_of_Louis_Bonaparte   (7234 words)

  
 Napoleon III --  Britannica Concise Encyclopedia - The online encyclopedia you can trust!
Attempting to expand his power, he staged a coup in 1851 and made himself dictator; in 1852, as Napoleon III, he became emperor of the Second Empire.
With the death in 1832 of Napoleon's son, Napoléon-François-Charles-Joseph Bonaparte, duke von Reichstadt, he became the claimant to the French throne.
During his rule Britain lost the American colonies, joined a coalition against the French Revolution, sent armies to fight those of Napoleon, and saw the steady emergence of cabinet-controlled government and party politics.
www.britannica.com /ebc/article-9373022   (970 words)

  
 Victor Schoelcher - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
He continued to express his political ideas and on December 2, 1851 went into exile in Belgium and London until 1870 after disagreeing with the writings of Louis-Napoléon Bonaparte's coup d'etat.
Victor Schoelcher (1804-1893) was a French abolitionist writer in the 1800's and the main spokesman for a group from Paris who worked for the abolition of slavery, and formed an abolition society in 1834.
He became the president of the commission for the abolition of slavery and on April 27, 1848 the French government decreed that slavery was abolished in all of its colonies.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Victor_Schoelcher   (385 words)

  
 Napoleon III --  Britannica Concise Encyclopedia - The online encyclopedia you can trust!
Attempting to expand his power, he staged a coup in 1851 and made himself dictator; in 1852, as Napoleon III, he became emperor of the Second Empire.
With the death in 1832 of Napoleon's son, Napoléon-François-Charles-Joseph Bonaparte, duke von Reichstadt, he became the claimant to the French throne.
During his rule Britain lost the American colonies, joined a coalition against the French Revolution, sent armies to fight those of Napoleon, and saw the steady emergence of cabinet-controlled government and party politics.
www.britannica.com /ebc/article-9373022   (385 words)

  
 CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: Felicite Robert de Lamennais
The coup d'état of 1851 put an end to the political career of Lamennais, who relapsed into misery and isolation.
Lamennais next published a violent article against the imperial university; indeed, when Napoleon returned from Elba, the young writer, thinking himself insecure in France, went over to England, where he found a temporary asylum with M. Carron, a French priest who had established in London a school for the children of émigrés.
Irritated by these attacks, a majority of the French bishops, who were moderate Gallicans, signed a protest against this pamphlet which accused them of leanings towards schism.
www.newadvent.org /cathen/08762a.htm   (385 words)

  
 Marmont, Auguste-Frederic-Louis Viesse de, Duc De Raguse --  Encyclopædia Britannica
French political and social leader during the Second Empire who played an important part in the coup d'état of Dec. 12, 1851, which eventually led to the establishment of Charles Louis-Napoléon Bonaparte, Morny's half brother, as Emperor Napoleon III.
As governor general of New France for two terms, from 1672 to 1682 and 1689 to 1698, Louis de Frontenac pushed the extension of that North American French colony west to present-day Manitoba and south to the Gulf of Mexico.
Biographical sketch of this French physicist best known for his research on quantum theory and for his discovery of the wave nature of electrons.
www.britannica.com /eb/article?tocId=9051041   (385 words)

  
 Nicolas-Charles Oudinot, duke de Reggio --  Encyclopædia Britannica
French political and social leader during the Second Empire who played an important part in the coup d'état of Dec. 12, 1851, which eventually led to the establishment of Charles Louis-Napoléon Bonaparte, Morny's half brother, as Emperor Napoleon III.
Biography of Charles Andre Joseph Marie de Gaulle, the French nationalist and statesman who led his country during World War II and became the president of fifth republic of France.
General de Gaulle led the Free French government in the dark days of World War II.
www.britannica.com /eb/article-9057709   (779 words)

  
 Search Encyclopedia.com
After serving in the French Foreign Legion in Algeria from 1837, he was one of the generals summoned from Africa by Louis Napoleon (later Napoleon III) to support his coup of Dec., 1851.
When Victor Amadeus II, duke of Savoy, in league with the French, set out to expel the Waldenses, Arnaud led (1686) a band of the Waldenses into Switzerland.
Arnaud, Henri Arnaud, HenriäNrē´ ärnō´, 1641-1721, pastor and leader of the Waldenses.
www.encyclopedia.com /searchpool.asp?target=Arnaud+Massy   (779 words)

  
 Mortier, Edouard-Adolphe-Casimir-Joseph, Duc De Trevise --  Encyclopædia Britannica
French political and social leader during the Second Empire who played an important part in the coup d'état of Dec. 12, 1851, which eventually led to the establishment of Charles Louis-Napoléon...
Mortier fought in the wars of the French Revolution, serving in the Army of the North, the Army of the Danube, and the Army of Helvetia.
French general, one of Napoleon's marshals, who also served as prime minister and minister of war during the reign of King Louis-Philippe.
www.britannica.com /eb/article?tocId=9053845   (779 words)

  
 Ogrinc: Adelsward Fersen
After the coup d'état of 1851, he and Hugo briefly shared exile on the island of Jersey.
Later, as a diplomat, he raised a storm in Versailles and arranged the escape of the French royal family to Varennes in 1791; he was made a Swedish field-marshal in 1801, became the personal favorite of Gustav III and his son, but was stoned to death by a mob when the crown prince suddenly died.
On his father's side, his family can be traced back to Baron Georges Axel d'Adelswärd, a Swedish officer who was captured by the French in 1793 and imprisoned in Longwy.
semgai.free.fr /contenu/textes/fersen/W_Ogrinc_Fersen.html   (11277 words)

  
 The WSCR Archive: Karl Marx: The Eighteenth Brumaire of Louis Bonaparte: Introduction
The "Eighteenth Brumaire" refers to November 9, 1799 in the French Revolutionary Calendar-- the day Napoleon Bonaparte made himself dictator by a coup d'etat.
Marx wrote The Eighteenth Brumaire of Louis Bonaparte between December 1851 and February 1852.
On December 2 1851, followers of President Louis Bonaparte (Napoleon's nephew) broke up the Legislative Assembly and established a dictatorship.
www.raggedclaws.com /criticalrealism/archive/brumaire_intro.html   (204 words)

  
 Indochina
King Mongkut (1851-68) was made famous by the musical, 'The King and I', based on the book 'Anna and the king of Siam' by Anna Leonowens, the English governess of the royal children.
Under his son, King Chulalongkorn (1868-1910), there was some economic modernization during his reign and Anglo-French agreements in 1896 and 1904 made Siam a neutral buffer kingdom between French Indochina and Burma which was under British control.
After the First World War, a nationalist renaissance movement developed, leading to a coup against King Prajadhipok.
www.gaminggeeks.org /Resources/KateMonk/Orient/Indochina/Thailand.htm   (812 words)

  
 Thailand - Hutchinson encyclopedia article about Thailand
King Mongkut and his successor, King Chulalongkura (Rama V; reigned 1868–1910), employed Western advisers to assist in the modernization of the country's administration and commerce, and managed to maintain Siam's independence by playing off the British interests to the west and south against those of the French to the east.
Although a treaty of friendship and trade was signed with Britain in 1826, it was only with the accession of King Mongkut (Rama IV) in 1851 that Siamese attitudes changed.
The year 1947 saw a military coup by the wartime leader Phibun Songkhram, and the army retained control during the next two decades, with the leader of the military junta periodically changed by a series of bloodless coups: Field Marshal Phibun Songkhram 1947–57, Field Marshal Sarit Thanarat 1957–63, and Gen Thanom Kittikachorn 1963–73.
encyclopedia.farlex.com /Thailand   (2510 words)

  
 CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: Comte de Montalembert
After the Coup d'Etat, 2 Dec., 1851 in an open letter to the "Univers", he invited the Catholics to rally to Louis Napoleon; this manifesto, which he afterwards regretted, was the result of an idea he had that it was unwholesome for Catholics to abstain from taking part in the life of the State.
His father, Marc René, had fought in the army of Condé, and had afterwards served in an English cavalry regiment; he was chosen by the Prince Regent of England to announce to Louis XVIII the Restoration of the French monarchy, and he became, under the Restoration plenipotentiary minister of Stuttgart, and, later, to Stockholm.
When the "Agence générale pour la défense de la liberté religieuse" (Central committee for the safeguarding of religious liberty), founded by the editors of "L'Avenir", had solemnly declared war on the monopoly of the French University by opening a primary school (9 May, 1831), Montalembert was indicted.
www.newadvent.org /cathen/10513b.htm   (2244 words)

  
 Important abolitionists: UNESCO Culture Sector
In 1851, Schoelcher opposed the coup d’état of Louis Napoleon and was forced into exile in England and Belgium until Napoleon’s fall in 1870.
Victor Schoelcher (1804-1893) was a French humanitarian, statesman and writer who devoted his life and fortune to the abolition of slavery in the French colonies.
Schoelcher believed that the production of sugar should continue in the colonies with the construction of large factories in replacement of slave labor.
portal.unesco.org /culture/en/ev.php-URL_ID=28370&URL_DO=DO_TOPIC&URL_SECTION=201.html   (324 words)

  
 Religion in Napoleonic France
  The French clergy fervently rallied behind Louis Napoleon Bonaparte’s presidential election in 1848 and approved of his coup on December 2, 1851.
  Since Napoleon III focused on granting concessions to the church in exchange for collaboration with his regime, the clergy therefore exploited this opportunity by attempting to control the social lives of the French, primarily for the church’s gain. 
  One does not find surprise then in the evidence that Napoleon III enjoyed support from devout Catholics and significant numbers of the rural population, while church-related organizations for women multiplied and began to noticeably merge with the right-wing politics of the Empire.
www.napoleon-series.org /research/napoleon/c_religion2.html   (324 words)

  
 AllRefer.com - Adolphe Thiers (French History, Biography) - Encyclopedia
Thiers supported Louis Napoleon Bonaparte (later Emperor Napoleon III) for president of the French republic, but his opposition to Bonaparte's coup in Dec., 1851, led to his arrest and exile.
Elected (1848) to the constituent assembly, Thiers was a leader of the right-wing liberals and bitterly opposed the socialists.
After studying law at Aix-en-Provence, Thiers went (1821) to Paris and joined the group of writers that attacked the reactionary government of King Charles X.
reference.allrefer.com /encyclopedia/T/Thiers-A.html   (644 words)

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