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Topic: Friedrich Mohs


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In the News (Sun 19 Nov 17)

  
  Friedrich Mohs (1773-1839)
With his systematic classification of the realm of minerals, Mohs was in conflict with most of the other mineralogists of the time, due to his preference for physical attributes as the principles of classification (i.e., shape, cleavage, hardness, and specific weight), as opposed to the chemical composition of the minerals.
In 1812, Mohs was appointed Professor of Mineralogy at the Joanneum in Graz.
In 1826, Mohs was appointed Professor of Mineralogy at the University of Vienna.
www.nhm-wien.ac.at /NHM/Mineral/Mohse.htm   (276 words)

  
  Friedrich Mohs
Friedrich Mohs (January 29, 1773 - September 29, 1839) was a German geologist/mineralogist[?].
In 1812, Mohs became professor in Graz; in 1818, professor in Freiberg, Saxony[?]; in 1826, professor in Vienna.
Mohs died during a trip to Italy in Agordo[?] near Belluno[?].
www.ebroadcast.com.au /lookup/encyclopedia/fr/Friedrich_Mohs.html   (86 words)

  
 Friedrich Mohs | životopis
Friedrich Mohs studoval chemii, matematiku a fyziku na univerzitě v Halle.
Friedrich Mohs klasifikoval minerály na základě jejich fyzikálních vlastností (např.
V roce 1812 se Friedrich Mohs stal profesorem mineralogie v Grazu (právě zde vznikla Mohsova stupnice tvrdosti).
www.converter.cz /fyzici/mohs.htm   (179 words)

  
 Moh's Hardness Scale - Mohs Scale (Mohs')
Mohs, born in Gernrode, Germany, studied chemistry, mathematics and physics at the University of Halle and also studied at the Mining Academy in Freiberg, Saxony.
After assuming the position of a foreman at a mine in 1801, Mohs moved in 1802 to Austria, where he was employed in trying to identify the minerals in a private collection of a Banker.
In 1812, Mohs became professor in Graz; in 1818, professor in Freiberg, Saxony; in 1826, professor in Vienna.
www.24carat.co.uk /hardnessmohsscale.html   (1117 words)

  
 Friedrich Mohs Summary
Mohs, born in Gernrode, Germany, studied chemistry, mathematics and physics at the University of Halle and also studied at the Mining Academy in Freiberg, Saxony.
After assuming the position of a foreman at a mine in 1801, Mohs moved in 1802 to Austria, where he was employed in trying to identify the minerals in a private collection of a Banker.
In 1812, Mohs became professor in Graz; in 1818, professor in Freiberg, Saxony; in 1826, professor in Vienna.
www.bookrags.com /Friedrich_Mohs   (263 words)

  
 Friedrich Mohs | Buzznick.com
Friedrich Mohs 1832 Friedrich Mohs January 29 1773 - September 29 1839 was a German geologist / mineralogist Mohs born in Gernrode Germany studied chemistry...
Friedrich Mohs Friedrich Mohs, 1832 Friedrich Mohs (January 29, 1773 - September 29, 1839) was a German geologist / mineralogist.
Moh's (Mohs) scale, devised in 1822 by Friedrich Moh, is still in common use by...
www.buzznick.com /friedrichmohs.html   (141 words)

  
 Mohs Hardness Scale
Mohs' scale of mineral hardness quantifies the scratch resistance of minerals by comparing the ability of a harder material to scratch a softer material.
The Mohs scale was invented in 1812, by the German mineralogist Friedrich Mohs.
With the Mohs Scale, the hardness of a material is measured against the scale by finding the hardest material that it can scratch, and/or by identifying the softest material that can scratch it.
www.khulsey.com /jewelry/mohs_hardness_scale.html   (528 words)

  
 Jewelry Care Gemstones-Mohs Scale
Mohs' scale of mineral hardness characterizes the scratch resistance of various minerals through the ability of a harder material to scratch a softer.
It was created, in 1812, by the German mineralogist Friedrich Mohs and is one of several definitions of hardness in materials science.
The Mohs Hardness Scale starting with talc at 1 and ending with diamond at 10, is universally used around the world as a way of distinguishing minerals.
www.ilglo.com /JewelryCareGemstones-MohsScale.htm   (286 words)

  
 Zeolite Mineral Corporation Brisbane Australia Home Page
The Mohs hardness of a mineral is determined by observing whether its surface is scratched by a substance of known or defined hardness.
For this reason the Mohs test, while greatly facilitating the identification of minerals in the field, is not suitable for accurately gauging the hardness of industrial materials such as steel or ceramics.
Another disadvantage of the Mohs scale is that it is not linear; that is, each increment of one in the scale does not indicate a proportional increase in hardness.
www.zeolitemineral.com /mohs.htm   (298 words)

  
 Guide to Mohs hardness scale.
Mohs hardness scale is one of the more popular techniques when it comes to evaluating physical characteristics of a gemstone or any other material for that matter.
The scale is named after Friedrich Mohs, a German geologist/mineralogist, who developed it in 1812 after more than a decade of intense gemstone studying.
As indicated in our guide to jewelry care, a consumer can theoretically determine what kind of jewelry design is compatible with his or her lifestyle using the knowledge of the Mohs hardness scale.
www.nandadesigns.com /mohs_scale.php   (425 words)

  
 Friedrich Mohs at AllExperts
Mohs, born in Gernrode, Germany, studied chemistry, mathematics and physics at the University of Halle and also studied at the Mining Academy in Freiberg, Saxony.
After assuming the position of a foreman at a mine in 1801, Mohs moved in 1802 to Austria, where he was employed in trying to identify the minerals in a private collection of a Banker.
He created a hardness scale that is still used today called the Mohs' scale of mineral hardness.
en.allexperts.com /e/f/fr/friedrich_mohs.htm   (247 words)

  
 Friedrich Mohs
Friedrich Mohs was a German scientist who studied minerals.
He moved to Austria in 1801 where he found a job identifying minerals in a collection that belonged to a wealthy banker.
About a decade later, Friedrich created a scale from one to 10 to describe mineral hardness.
www.windows.ucar.edu /tour/link=/earth/geology/mohs_sci.html   (235 words)

  
 JK Schmidt Jewellers - Mohs Hardness Scale - Kelowna, BC
The Mohs scale of hardness is the most common method used to rank gemstones according to hardness.
Devised by German mineralogist Friedrich Mohs in 1812, this scale grades minerals on a scale from 1 (very soft) to 10 (very hard).
The Mohs scale is a relative scale, for example, diamond (10) is about 4-5 times harder than corundum (9), which is about 2 times harder than topaz (8).
www.jkschmidt.ca /mohs.htm   (156 words)

  
 Blue Nile - Glossary
A scale developed by Friedrich Mohs to determine the relative hardness of minerals and other objects.
The scale assigns the numbers 1 to 10 to specific minerals, softest to hardest respectively, using a scratch test.
For reference, the average fingernail has a Mohs hardness of about 2.5, while the average knife rates a hardness of 5.5.
www.bluenile.com /glossary.asp?word=mohshardnessscale   (56 words)

  
 Mohs scale of mineral hardness, minerals identification, MineralTown.com
He started classifying minerals by their physical characteristics, in spite of their chemical composition, as it was done before.
He created a hardness scale that is still used as Mohs scale of mineral hardness.
Diamond is at the top of the scale, with a rating of 10, Talc is the softest, with a rating of 1.
www.mineraltown.com /infocoleccionar/mohs_scale_of_hardness.htm   (317 words)

  
 Mineral Resources: Hardness
For example, if mineral A scratches mineral B, and mineral B does not scratch mineral A, then mineral A is harder than mineral B. If mineral A and B both scratch each other, then their hardness is equal or very similar.
A scale to measure hardness was devised by Austrian mineralogist Frederick (Friedrich) Mohs in 1822, and is currently the standard scale for measuring hardness.
Although the Mohs scale is very useful, it is not linear.
www.minerals.net /resource/property/hardness.htm   (916 words)

  
 Friedrich Mohs
Friedrich Mohs fue un científico alemán que estudió los minerales.
Aproximadamente una década después, Friedrich creó una escala, del uno al diez para, con esta escala, definir la dureza de un mineral.
Pero, sin duda, los geólogos alrededor del mundo aprecian lo que hizo Friedrich.
www.windows.ucar.edu /tour/link=/earth/geology/mohs_sci.sp.html   (320 words)

  
 Friedrich Mohs
Friedrich Mohs was a scientist who lived about 200 years ago in Europe.
He looked at a crystal closely and checked its hardness to decide which kind it was.
Friedrich made a scale from one to ten to describe the hardness of different minerals.
www.windows.ucar.edu /tour/link=/earth/geology/mohs_sci.html&edu=elem   (137 words)

  
 Desert Moissanite-Exquisite Moissanite!
The Mohs Scale is used to determine the hardness of solids, especially minerals.
It is named after the German mineralogist Friedrich Mohs.
The hardness of a mineral is a measure of its ability to resist abrasion or scratching by other minerals or by an object of known hardness.
www.desertmoissanite.com /moissanite-mohs.html   (672 words)

  
 Mineral Gallery: Hardness
That is exactly what French mineralogist Friedrich Mohs proposed almost one hundred and seventy years ago.
The Mohs Hardness Scale starting with talc at 1 and ending with diamond at 10, is universally used around the world as a way of distinguishing minerals.
The simpler, relative Mohs hardness scale is much easier to remember and use.
mineral.galleries.com /minerals/hardness.htm   (1031 words)

  
 Friedrich Mohs Biography (1773–1839) Online Encyclopedia Article About Friedrich Mohs Biography (1773–1839)
Friedrich Mohs Biography (1773–1839) Online Encyclopedia Article About Friedrich Mohs Biography (1773–1839)
The Mohs scale for measuring mineral hardness, introduced in 1812, is still in use, rating talc as hardness 1, and diamond as hardness 10.
Do not copy, download, transfer, or otherwise replicate the site content in whole or in part.
encyclopedia.jrank.org /Cambridge/entries/031/Friedrich-Mohs.html   (104 words)

  
 Definition of Mohs' scale - Merriam-Webster Online Dictionary
Learn more about "Mohs' scale" and related topics at Britannica.com
Find more about "Mohs' scale" instantly with Live Search
See a map of "Mohs' scale" in the Visual Thesaurus
www.m-w.com /dictionary/Mohs'+scale   (56 words)

  
 Mohs Scale of Hardness, online gemological expertise
Mohs Scale was developed in 1812 by German mineralogist Friedrich Mohs
Mohs Scale of hardness is a RELATIVE scale, not proportional.
Not seeing the gem you are looking for?
gemologyonline.com /mohs.html   (66 words)

  
 Mohs' scale   (Site not responding. Last check: )
A scale of hardness primarily used for minerals, devised around 1812 by Friedrich Mohs (1773 — 1839), a German minerologist, and published by him in 1824.
Mohs’ scale consists of 10 common minerals in order of increasing hardness (shown in the second column below).
Increasingly sophisticated methods for measuring hardness showed that the steps in Mohs' scale are far from equal, especially at the high end.
www.sizes.com /units/mohs_scale.htm   (217 words)

  
 Utility Of Mohs Hardness Testing
Evolved by the German mineralogist Friedrich Mohs in 1812, Mohs Hardness Test is one among the earliest ways of measuring hardness and it revolves round the observation whether a materials surface is scratched by a substance of known or defined hardness.
Mohs hardness of a mineral is established through close observation of whether its surface is scratched by a standard substance of 'known or defined hardness'.
Mohs hardness testing undoubtedly facilitates the identification of minerals, however, it is not the ideal method for gauging the hardness of industrial materials such as steel, iron or ceramics.
www.articledashboard.com /Article/Utility-Of-Mohs-Hardness-Testing/129171   (575 words)

  
 Mohs Scale of Hardness
The Mohs scale of hardness is the most common method used to rank gemstones according to hardness.
Devised by German mineralogist Friedrich Mohs in 1812, this scale grades minerals on a scale from 1 (very soft) to 10 (very hard).
Because the Mohs scale is a relative scale, the difference between the hardness of a diamond and that of a ruby is much greater than the difference in hardness between calcite and gypsum.
jewelrymaking.allinfoabout.com /features/mohs.html   (245 words)

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