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Topic: Frontal lobe


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  Psychopathology of Frontal Lobe Syndromes
Their increasing significance and clinical relevance is noted by the recent publication of several monographs on frontal lobe syndromes (5,6) and the growing literature on various frontal lobe disorders, for example, frontal lobe dementias and frontal lobe epilepsies.
The frontal lobes are anatomically represented by those areas of the cortex anterior to the central sulcus, including the main cortical areas fur the control of motor behavior.
The paradigm of frontal lobe dementia is that described by Pick in 1892, which was associated with circumscribed atrophy of both the frontal and temporal lobes.
www.ect.org /effects/lobe.html   (3482 words)

  
 eMedicine - Frontal Lobe Epilepsy : Article by Sheryl Haut, MD
Background: Frontal lobe epilepsy is characterized by recurrent seizures arising from the frontal lobes.
Patients with frontal lobe seizures may present with a clear epileptic syndrome or with unusual behavioral or motor manifestations that are not immediately recognizable as seizures.
Frontal lobe epilepsy may be an early or late aftermath of head trauma.
www.emedicine.com /NEURO/topic141.htm   (4549 words)

  
 Frontal lobe seizures
Seizures that begin in the front of the brain (frontal lobe seizures) vary the most from one individual to another and may produce unusual symptoms that can appear to be related to a psychiatric problem or a sleep disorder.
Frontal lobe epilepsy occurs in all age groups, often beginning in childhood.
Because seizures in frontal lobe epilepsy are brief and may spread rapidly to other regions, it's sometimes difficult to pinpoint the area in the brain that needs to be removed.
www.cnn.com /HEALTH/library/DS/00810.html   (777 words)

  
 Frontal Lobe Function
The frontal lobes are involved in motor function, problem solving, spontaneity, memory, language, initiation, judgement, impulse control, and social and sexual behavior.
The frontal lobes are extremely vulnerable to injury due to their location at the front of the cranium, proximity to the sphenoid wing and their large size.
The left frontal lobe is involved in controlling language related movement, whereas the right frontal lobe plays a role in non-verbal abilities.
www.neuroskills.com /tbi/bfrontal.shtml   (741 words)

  
 Frontal Lobe Syndrome
Frontal lobe syndrome is a disorder affecting the prefrontal areas of the frontal lobe.
The frontal lobe syndrome patient's memory is normal, but absentmindedness may lead to the appearance of a memory deficit as the patient literally "forgets to remember" and has the inability to focus attention long enough to form the rudiments of memory.
Perseveration is common in frontal lobe syndrome patients and is the tendency to maintain a previously established motor pattern without modifying the activity according to the demands of the changing environment because of an inability to shift from one line of thinking to another.
www.chiroweb.com /hg/13/14/05.html   (866 words)

  
 ipedia.com: Frontal lobe Article   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
The frontal lobe comprises four major folds of cortical tissue: the precentral gyrus, superior gyrus and the middle gyrus of the frontal gyri, the inferior frontal gyrus.
People who have damaged frontal lobes may experience problems with these aspects of cognitive function, being at times impulsive; impaired in their ability to plan and execute complex sequences of actions; perhaps persisting with one course of action or pattern of behaviour when a change would be appropriate (perseveration).
Frontal lobotomy (sometimes called frontal leucotomy) successfully reduced distress but at the cost of often blunting the subject's emotions, volition and personality.
www.ipedia.com /frontal_lobe.html   (681 words)

  
 eMedicine - Frontal Lobe Syndromes : Article by Daniel H Jacobs, MD
Teuber (1964) described the frontal lobes as "a riddle." Despite their size, their function is mysterious, and many clinicians do not know how to test the frontal lobes during mental status examinations because they have not been trained to do so.
The dorsolateral portion of the prefrontal cortex and the orbitofrontal portion, the portions of the frontal lobes on which this article focuses, maintain separate and discrete projections to different areas of both the thalamus and neostriatum (caudate nucleus, putamen) and serve different functions.
Because the dorsolateral frontal cortex is concerned with planning, strategy formation, and executive function, patients with dorsolateral frontal lesions tend to have apathy, personality changes, abulia, and lack of ability to plan or to sequence.
www.emedicine.com /neuro/topic436.htm   (4299 words)

  
 symptom of frontal lobe dementia,symptom of frontal lobe dementia
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greataol.info /symptom-of-frontal-lobe-dementia   (711 words)

  
 SparkNotes: Brain Anatomy: Frontal Lobe
The frontal lobe is one of the four lobes of the human brain.
The frontal lobe is responsible for a number of higher-order functions, such as planning and inhibition, and is considered to be the seat of working memory.
In addition, the study found increased activity in areas of the temporal lobe, which is not surprising since the hippocampus, a structure well-known for its involvement in memory, and its adjacent pathways are located in the temporal lobe.
www.sparknotes.com /psychology/neuro/brainanatomy/section3.rhtml   (1277 words)

  
 MayoClinic.com Health Library - Frontal lobe seizures
Seizures that begin in the front of the brain (frontal lobe seizures) vary the most from one individual to another and may produce unusual symptoms that can appear to be related to a psychiatric problem or a sleep disorder.
Frontal lobe seizures arise in the brain's frontal lobes, which are located just behind the forehead.
Because seizures in frontal lobe epilepsy are brief and may spread rapidly to other regions, it's sometimes difficult to pinpoint the area in the brain that needs to be removed.
www.riverside-online.com /health_reference/Nervous-System/DS00810.cfm   (787 words)

  
 What Is Picks Disease from Alzheimer's Outreach
Frontal lobe dementia and Pick's disease are the cause of less than 10% of all dementias and may usually be distinguished from Alzheimer's disease early in the course of the illness.
Pick's disease affects the temporal lobes of the brain in 25%, frontal lobes in 25% and both frontal and temporal lobes in 50% of cases.
In most cases of Pick's disease, the frontal and temporal lobes of the brain are the areas affected and with Alzheimer's disease, the temporal and parietal lobes are affected.
www.zarcrom.com /users/alzheimers/odem/pk5.html   (1210 words)

  
 Frontal Lobe dementia - Frontal Lobe dementia Symptom, Cause, Treatment
Frontal lobe dementia is a set of degenerative diseases producing many of the same symptoms as vascular dementia.
Frontal lobe dementia is the name given to any dementia caused by damage to this part of the brain.
Frontal lobe dementia is caused in a similar way to Alzheimer's disease in that it involves a progressive decline in a person's mental abilities over a number of years.
www.depression-treatment-help.com /mental-disorders/frontal-lobe-dementia.htm   (766 words)

  
 Paranoia and Memory Loss/Frontal Lobe Dementia from Alzheimer's Outreach
Frontal lobe dementias are characterized by early psychiatric symptoms followed later by cognitive impairments.
Frontal lobe syndrome is therefore the presenting symptomatology: apathy, poor social judgment, and bizarre behavior.
The history of normal cognitive performance in the face of poor judgment, poor executive function, and the imaging consistent with frontal lobe involvement are the basis of this diagnosis.
www.zarcrom.com /users/alzheimers/odem/pk8.html   (931 words)

  
 Frontal Lobe Epilepsy   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
Partial seizures beginning in the frontal lobe may produce weakness or the inability to use certain muscles, including the muscles that make it possible to talk.
Sudden thrashing movements during sleep are also characteristic of frontal lobe epilepsy; as is posturing with the head jerking to one side, and the arm rising with it into a brief, frozen state.
Frontal lobe epilepsy has significant social effects because the seizures it generates are more likely to involve brief episodes of screaming, bicycling movements, or even movements suggestive of sexual activity.
www.epilepsyfoundation.org /answerplace/Medical/seizures/syndromes/frontallobe.cfm   (188 words)

  
 Pick's Disease: Frontal Lobe Dementia
Frontal lobe dementia is distinguished from other types of dementia by the presence of abnormalities called Pick bodies, found in the frontal and temporal lobes of the brain.
When the frontal lobes that control behavior are involved, the first symptoms are usually behavioral changes.
Pick's disease is typically localized in the frontal and temporal cerebral lobes; Alzheimer's attacks various areas of the brain including the posterior, temporal and parietal regions and the hippocampus.
www.about-dementia.com /dementia/picks-disease.php   (732 words)

  
 Frontal Lobe Epilepsy : Epilepsy.com
After temporal lobe epilepsy, EpilepsyA disorder characterized by transient but recurrent disturbances of brain function that may or may not be associated with impairment or loss of consciousness and abnormal movements or behavior.
The frontal lobes are large and include many areas that do not have a precisely known function.
Complex partial seizures beginning in the frontal lobe tend to be shorter (usually lasting less than 1 minute) than ones that start in the temporal lobe.
www.epilepsy.com /epilepsy/epilepsy_frontallobe.html   (755 words)

  
 Frontal lobe - Psychology Wiki
The frontal lobe is an area in the brain of vertebrates.
People that have damaged frontal lobes may experience problems with these aspects of cognitive function, being at times impulsive; impaired in their ability to plan and execute complex sequences of actions; perhaps persisting with one course of action or pattern of behavior when a change would be appropriate (perseveration).
The so-called executive functions of the frontal lobes involve the ability to recognize future consequences resulting from current actions, to choose between good and bad actions (or better and best), override and suppress unacceptable social responses, and determine similarities and differences between things or events.
psychology.wikia.com /wiki/Frontal_lobe   (1107 words)

  
 Frontal Lobe Seizures
Although the various types of frontal lobe seizures may appear as relatively typical examples, it is not uncommon for them to present as mixed forms.
Examples include frontal lobe absence type seizures as well as seizures beginning in the medial posterior orbital cortex, which preferentially spread to the medial temporal structures and strongly resemble typical temporal lobe seizures.
Frontal lobe seizures (seizures of the cerebral cortex)
www.ilae-epilepsy.org /Visitors/Centre/ctf/frontal_lobe.html   (5633 words)

  
 Dysfunction by Location: Brain Dysfunction: Merck Manual Home Edition
Frontal Lobe Damage: Generally, damage to the frontal lobes causes loss of the ability to solve problems and to plan and initiate actions, such as crossing the street or answering a complex question.
If the middle part of the frontal lobe is damaged, the ability to move the eyes, to perform complex movements in the correct sequence, or to say words may be impaired.
If the front part of the frontal lobe is damaged, the result may be impaired concentration and reduced fluency of speech; apathy, inattentiveness, and delayed responses to questions; or a striking lack of inhibition, including socially inappropriate behavior.
www.merck.com /mmhe/sec06/ch082/ch082b.html   (638 words)

  
 CNADC - Frontotemporal Dementia
When the brains of individuals with frontal lobe dementia are studied after death, the types of microscopic abnormalities that are seen are typically of two kinds.
Pick's disease, which accounts for 20% of cases of frontal lobe dementia, is identified under the microscope by abnormal particles called "Pick bodies", named after the neurologist who first observed them.
Individuals with frontal lobe dementia often lack flexibility in thinking and are unable to carry a project through to completion.
www.brain.northwestern.edu /mdad/frontal.html   (1561 words)

  
 Frontal Lobe
The frontal lobes are responsible for voluntary motor activity, speaking ability and elaboration of thought.
The frontal lobe extends from the central sulcus to the anterior limit of the brain.
The posterior portion of the frontal lobe is precentral gyrus, which is specialized for the control of fine movements, such as the movement of fingers one at a time.
library.thinkquest.org /19910/data/frontal_lobe.htm   (302 words)

  
 Frontal lobe damage
Frontal lobe damage occurs when the cerebral cortex frontal lobe mostly controls learned motor skill (for instance, tying a shoelace, playing a musical instrument, or writing).
The frontal lobe also coordinates expressive gestures and facial expression certain parts of the frontal lobe are responsible for certain skilled activity on the body’s opposite side.
Individuals with larger defect toward the side or front of the frontal lobe has a tendency to be inappropriately euphoric, easily destructed, rude, vulgar, and argumentative; they can disregard their behavior consequences.
www.unitedhealthdirectory.com /frontal_lobe_damage-865.html   (153 words)

  
 frontal-lobe-syndrome
All in all, therefore, frontal amnesias turned out to be neither as immediately obvious nor as clinically clear-cut as those arising from temporal lobe damage, and neither memory nor intelligence tests, generally speaking, were particularly good at detecting frontal lobe damage.
This time, the hands of the patient (with a massive bilateral lesion of the frontal lobes) are under the blanket; in order to execute the instruction, 'lift the hand', he must perform a complex series of movements.
Another frontal sign to attract the attention of cognitive theorists is "confabulation", the inventing of factually spurious explanations to "fit" otherwise fragmentary and/or inconsistent recollections, and another hot line of enquiry is into the relationship between confabulation and "autobiographical memory" [glossary].
www.smithsrisca.demon.co.uk /frontal-lobe-syndrome.html   (13769 words)

  
 Frontal Lobe Seizures
The semiology of seizures originating in the anterior part of the frontal lobe is often puzzling and it can be difficult to establish the differential diagnosis between epilepsy and psychiatric or movement disorders.
However, as already stated, anterior frontal lobe seizures are often brief and recovery of consciousness is generally rapid in the post-ictal period.
Although a classification of frontal lobe seizures is certainly preliminary, nevertheless, general trends appear along the antero-posterior and medio-lateral axis of anatomical organization.
www.eurepa.de /publications/hand_outs/semiology_of_seizures/chauvel.html   (3795 words)

  
 Frontal lobe seizures - MayoClinic.com
Seizures that begin in the front of the brain (frontal lobe seizures) vary the most from one individual to another and may produce unusual symptoms that can appear to be related to a psychiatric problem or a sleep disorder.
Many frontal lobe seizures occur during sleep, causing people to jump out of bed and run around or pound on things.
Frontal lobe epilepsy may produce very brief seizures, often lasting less than a minute, that recur multiple times a day.
www.mayoclinic.com /health/frontal-lobe-seizures/DS00810   (282 words)

  
 Frontal Lobe Injury - Law Firm Walkup, Melodia, Kelly, Wecht & Schoenberger Attorneys San Francisco, California
The frontal lobe is in the front portion of the brain.
If an area within the frontal lobe (called Broca's Area) is injured, the injury may cause expressive aphasia; a condition where, even though a person can understand others' speech without much difficulty, that person cannot form words.
They include loss of the ability to move parts of the body (paralysis), loss of flexible thinking and the ability to be spontaneous with others, persistence of a single thought in one's mind, the aforementioned expressive aphasia, and loss of the ability to complete processes as simple as making coffee.
www.brain-injurylawyer.com /CM/TraumaticBrainInjury/Frontal-Lobe-Injury.asp   (358 words)

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