Factbites
 Where results make sense
About us   |   Why use us?   |   Reviews   |   PR   |   Contact us  

Topic: Fugue


Related Topics

  
  Fugue - LoveToKnow 1911
Hence, a rule or canon was given, often in enigmatic form, by which the comes was deduced from the dux: and so the term canon became the appropriate name for the form itself, and is still retained.
Cherubini, holding the doctrine that a fugue cannot have more than one subject, insists on applying the term to the less prominent of the subjects of what are commonly called double fugues, i.e.
fugue with an exact answer) that could rightly be contrasted with tonal fugue would be that in which the answer ought to be tonal but is not.
www.1911encyclopedia.org /Fugue   (621 words)

  
 Dissociative Fugue: Dissociative Disorders: Merck Manual Professional
Dissociative fugue is one or more episodes of amnesia in which the inability to recall some or all of one's past is combined with either the loss of one's identity or the formation of a new identity.
Fugues are often mistaken for malingering, because fugues may remove the person from accountability for his actions, absolve him of certain responsibilities, or reduce his exposure to hazardous situations.
A fugue may remove the patient from an embarrassing situation or intolerable stress or may be related to issues of rejection or separation.
www.merck.com /mmpe/sec15/ch197/ch197d.html   (561 words)

  
 Musical Forms - Fugue
The exposition is the only essential for the definition of a piece as a fugue, but most fugues proceed to further entries of the subject, which may be separated by 'episodes', often based on material from the exposition.
Mendelssohn's e Minor fugue op.35 no.1 is a good example of the Baroque fugue seen through the eyes of a Romantic composer, and both Schumann and Brahms, with their academic leanings, made significant use of fugue in a number of works.
Hindemith's Ludus tonalis and Shostakovich's 24 Preludes and Fugues, both for piano, are modern equivalents of Bach's Well-tempered Clavier, and the first movement of Bartók's Music for Strings, Percussion and Celesta is a notable example of the use of traditional fugal procedures in a harmonic idiom based on the tritone.
w3.rz-berlin.mpg.de /cmp/g_fugue.html   (620 words)

  
 Great Fugue: The New Yorker
In fact, Beethoven was always negotiating between the demands of his muse and the desires of the world, as the history of the Great Fugue shows.
When the piece is restored to its former position, as the finale of the Quartet Opus 130, a correspondence emerges: the first-violin part in the preceding movement, the Cavatina, comes to rest on the same note.
In opera, a cavatina is generally an aria of a short and simple type; this one is as slow, gentle, and lyrical as the Fugue is headlong, ferocious, and cerebral.
www.newyorker.com /critics/music/articles/060206crmu_music   (1284 words)

  
  Fugue: Anatomy of
A fugue generally consists of a series of expositions and developments with no fixed number of either.
Fugues that are tonally centered will expose the subject without venturing out of an initial tonic/dominant constellation.
To qualify as an exposition, the subject (or answer) must appear in all voices and answers must be in the proper relationship (tonal or real) to subjects.
jan.ucc.nau.edu /~tas3/fugueanatomy.html   (1581 words)

  
  Fugue - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
A widespread view of the fugue is that it is not a musical form (in the sense that, say, sonata form is) but rather a technique of composition.
It was in the Baroque period that the writing of fugues became central to composition, in part as a demonstration of compositional expertise.
The Art of Fugue is a collection of fugues (and four canons) on a single theme that is gradually transformed as the cycle progresses.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Fugue   (4089 words)

  
 Fugue state - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
A fugue state is therefore similar in nature to the concept of dissociative identity disorder (DID) (formerly called multiple-personality disorder) although DID is widely understood to have its conception in a long-term life event (such as a traumatic childhood), where sufficient time is given for alternate personality representations to form and take hold.
As the person experiencing a fugue state may have recently suffered an amnesic onset—perhaps a head trauma, or the reappearance of an event or person representing an earlier life trauma—the emergence of a "new" personality seems to be for some, a logical apprehension of the situation.
Unlike a dissociative identity disorder, a fugue is usually considered to be a malingering disorder, resolving to remove the experiencer from responsibility for their actions, or from situations imposed upon them by others.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Fugue_state   (1143 words)

  
 The Classical Fugue Information Page on Classic Cat
Fugues are also not limited in the way the exposition is structured, the number of expositions in related keys, or the number of episodes (if any).
Palestrina's imitative motets differed from fugues in that each phrase of the text had a different subject which was introduced and worked out separately, whereas a fugue continued working with the same subject or subjects throughout the entire length of the piece.
Bach's most famous fugues are those for the harpsichord in The Well-Tempered Clavier and the Art of Fugue, and his organ fugues, which are usually preceded by a prelude or toccata.
www.classiccat.net /print.php?page=genres/fugue.info.htm   (4480 words)

  
 Dissociative fugue: Encyclopedia of Mental Disorders
Dissociative fugue is a rare condition in which a person suddenly, without planning or warning, travels far from home or work and leaves behind a past life.
Accurate diagnosistypically must wait until the fugue is over and the person has sought help or has been brought to the attention of mental health care providers.
Since the cause of the fugue is usually a traumatic event, it is often necessary to treat disturbing feelings and emotions that emerge when the patient finally faces the trauma.
health.enotes.com /mental-disorders-encyclopedia/dissociative-fugue   (966 words)

  
 Fugue
In the latter case, the work has the structure: fugue on subject A; fugue on subject B; combination of subjects A and B. While triple fugues are not uncommon (see Bach C# minor WTC I and F# minor WTC II), quadruple fugues are rare.
A motet differed from a fugue in that each phrase of the text had a different subject which was introduced and worked out separately, whereas a fugue continued working with the same subject or subjects throughout the entire length of the piece.
Bach's most famous fugues are those for the harpsichord in The Well-Tempered Clavier and the (unfinished) Art of Fugue, and his organ fugues, which are usually preceded by a prelude or toccata.
www.mp3.fm /Fugue.htm   (2961 words)

  
 Sonic Glossary: Fugue
Fugue is associated particularly with the late Baroque period, but continued in use during the Classical period and into the Romantic era.
One final convention: the closing moments of a fugue are often marked by the use of a sustained note, called a pedal, in one of the voices, most often the bass.
Listen again to the Bach fugue "It is the Ancient Law." This time, instead of listening for subject and countersubject, try to hear the bass line, which is a basso continuo part, plodding constantly on, at about twice the speed of the voices.
www.columbia.edu /ccnmtl/draft/paul/sonic/fugue.html   (1309 words)

  
 fugue - Search Results - MSN Encarta
Fugue (Latin fuga, “flight”), musical composition in which a melodic theme is systematically subjected to melodic imitation.
Fugue, Dissociative, mental illness in which a person forgets his or her personal identity and unexpectedly wanders away from home.
Double Fugue, in music, a fugue consisting of two subjects (principal melodies).
encarta.msn.com /fugue.html   (151 words)

  
 BACH The Art of Fugue, arr. Amsterdam Loeki Stardust Quartet (Channel) - INKPOT
Some of his fugues will be prized for their tenderness and pathos when many a melting sonata and poignant symphonic poem will be shelved forever".
In 1774, Kirnberger wrote "the Art of Fugue is more difficult in the entire science of compositions than this, each of the four voices have not only its own fluent melody, but all of them have a uniform character which is maintained so that in their union, a single perfect whole is created".
There are many new areas of the fugue which when played on a single instrument could be lost and this is where four different instruments (or 17 as the case may be) make the Art much more clearer.
inkpot.com /classical/bachfuguealsq.html   (1480 words)

  
 Psych Central: Dissociative Fugue Symptoms
Dissociative Fugue is one or more episodes of amnesia in which the inability to recall some or all of one's past and either the loss of one's identity or the formation of a new identity occur with sudden, unexpected, purposeful travel away from home.
Sometimes the fugue cannot be diagnosed until the person abruptly returns to his prefugue identity and is distressed to find himself in unfamiliar circumstances.
If the fugue was prolonged and complications due to behavior before or during the fugue are significant, the person may have considerable difficulties--eg, a soldier may be charged as a deserter, and a person who marries may have inadvertently become a bigamist.
www.psychcentral.com /disorders/sx87.htm   (618 words)

  
 Definition of fugue - Merriam-Webster Online Dictionary
1 a : a musical composition in which one or two themes are repeated or imitated by successively entering voices and contrapuntally developed in a continuous interweaving of the voice parts b : something that resembles a fugue especially in interweaving repetitive elements
Find more about "fugue" instantly with Live Search
See a map of "fugue" in the Visual Thesaurus
www.m-w.com /dictionary/fugue   (108 words)

  
 Links to fugue theory: treatises, analyses, tools
Analysis of Bach's fugue in g minor BWV 861 (by Jose Rodriguez Alvira)*
Historical and analytical studies on fugues (by Paul Walker)
Section on the Art of Fugue by J.S. Bach
www.kunstderfuge.com /theory.htm   (176 words)

Try your search on: Qwika (all wikis)

Factbites
  About us   |   Why use us?   |   Reviews   |   Press   |   Contact us  
Copyright © 2005-2007 www.factbites.com Usage implies agreement with terms.