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Topic: Fujiwara clan


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In the News (Mon 19 Aug 19)

  
  NationMaster - Encyclopedia: Five regent houses
Fujiwara clan had also other families, but traditionally only these five were eligible for regentship.
Thus, with the exception of Tokugawa Masako, wife of the Emperor Mizunoo, all Empresses of that long period were of the clans that formed the Sekke or from branches of the imperial family itself.
As one of the Sekke, the five regent houses, the Kujō clan monopolized the offices of Sessho and Kampaku along with the Konoe, Takatsukasa, Nijo and Ichijo clans from the 12th century until 1867.
www.nationmaster.com /encyclopedia/Five-regent-houses   (0 words)

  
 NationMaster - Encyclopedia: Fujiwara no Kamatari
Fujiwara no Kamatari (藤原鎌足, 614–669 A.D.) was the founder of the Fujiwara clan in Japan.
Fujiwara no Fuhito (藤原不比等: 659–720) was a powerful member of the imperial court of Japan during the Asuka and Nara periods.
Second son of Fujiwara no Kamatari (or, according to one theory, of Emperor Tenji), he had sons by two women, and those sons were the founders of the four principal lineages of the Fujiwara clan: the South, North, Ceremonial, and Capital lineages.
www.nationmaster.com /encyclopedia/Fujiwara-no-Kamatari   (0 words)

  
 880. 2001. The Encyclopedia of World History
Fujiwara Mototsune (836–91) became the first kanpaku (regent for an emperor who was no longer a minor), a post thereafter customarily held by the head of the clan when an adult emperor was on the throne, while the post of sessh
The branch of the warrior Taira clan (or Heike), which was to rule Japan for part of the 12th century, was founded when a great-grandson of Kanmu was given this surname.
This was the heyday of the Fujiwara clan and the core of the Fujiwara period.
www.bartleby.com /67/386.html   (1079 words)

  
 Fujiwara clan - Definition, explanation
The Fujiwara clan (藤原) was a clan of regents who monopolized the title of Sekkan, Sessho and Kampaku.
Fujiwara no Fuhito, the son and heir of Kamatari was prominent at the court of several emperors and empresses.
During Heian periods of Japanese history, the Fujiwara clan, precisely Fujiwara Hokke managed to establish a hereditary claim to the position of regent, either for an underage emperor (Sessho) or for an adult one (Kampaku).
www.calsky.com /lexikon/en/txt/f/fu/fujiwara_clan.php   (0 words)

  
 880. 2001. The Encyclopedia of World History
Fujiwara Mototsune (836–91) became the first kanpaku (regent for an emperor who was no longer a minor), a post thereafter customarily held by the head of the clan when an adult emperor was on the throne, while the post of sessh
The branch of the warrior Taira clan (or Heike), which was to rule Japan for part of the 12th century, was founded when a great-grandson of Kanmu was given this surname.
This was the heyday of the Fujiwara clan and the core of the Fujiwara period.
www.bartelby.com /67/386.html   (0 words)

  
 China in Miniature
Clans ties remained very strong in outlying areas of the country where the spirit of local autonomy was far too deeply felt and communications far too difficult and imperfect to permit any centralized government to directly rule the provinces through a capital-based bureaucracy.
By the time her son reached the age when he could ascend the throne, the reigning emperor, usually bored with the seemingly endless ceremonies required by his dual role as a secular and religious leader, was easily persuaded to abdicate and retire to a simpler life.
This left the Fujiwara girl as an empress dowager and made her father, the powerful head of a large and wealthy court family, grandfather of the new child emperor.
www.koreanhistoryproject.org /Ket/C04/E0402.htm   (2287 words)

  
 Samurai Rising
During the tenth and eleventh centuries, the Fujiwara family lived in the cultural limelight, all the while holding a firm grip on the reins of power in Heian-kyo.
Unlike the capital aristocracy, the provincial clan aristocrats were quite self-sufficient and seemed content to leave the imperial government alone so long as they could continue to control the peasants on their estates and organize their armed cliques for local self-defense without interference from the capital.
The Minamoto clan's prestige was still strong in the Kanto region and, in the provinces at least, men believed a local military leader would be more likely to respect and protect their interests and property rights than would a distant court aristocrat like the military dictator Taira Kiyomori.
www.koreanhistoryproject.org /Ket/C05/E0504.htm   (3097 words)

  
 nFiction.com   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Minamoto Clan- This is the clan situated in the mountains.
Fujiwara Clan- This is the clan situated in thethe desert.
Taira Clan- This is the clan situated in the forest.
www.nfiction.com /showstory.php?storyid=7115&uname=Kendosakuyamon&sname=Honour&search=1   (1357 words)

  
 Japan People
Mononobe and Nakatomi clans: powerful native clans influential at court in the sixth century; were against the adoption of Buddhism as a state religion.
Fujiwara no Yoshifusa (804-72); becomes the first regent of an emperor from outside the imperial family in 858; from this time on Fujiwara leaders are the source of real political power.
Fujiwara no Michinaga (966-1027); leader of the Fujiwara clan at the height of Fujiwara ascendancy in the late tenth and early eleventh centuries.
www.history.umd.edu /Faculty/agoldman/284/htm_pages/terms/j_people.htm   (752 words)

  
 Minamoto no Yoshitsune
Eventually Yoshitsune was put under the protection of Fujiwara no Hidehira[?], head of the powerful regional Fujiwara[?] clan in Hiraizumi[?] of Mutsu[?] province.
In 1180, Yoshitsune heard that Yoshitomo, now head of the Minamoto clan, had raised an army at the request of Prince Mochihito[?] to fight against the Taira clan which had usurped the power of the emperor.
Because of Yoshitsune's tragic life and early death, he is one of the greatest folk heroes of Japan, becoming the subject of and influencing many works of Japanese literature and Japanese drama[?], while the details of his life became legendary.
www.ebroadcast.com.au /lookup/encyclopedia/mi/Minamoto_no_Yoshitsune.html   (323 words)

  
 Heian Period (794–1185) | Thematic Essay | Timeline of Art History | The Metropolitan Museum of Art
The Fujiwaras succeeded in dominating the royal family by marrying female clan members to emperors and then ruling on behalf of the offspring of these unions when they assumed the throne.
Fujiwara courtiers encouraged an aura of courtly sophistication and sensitivity in all of their activities, including the visual and literary arts, and even religious practice.
By the second half of the twelfth century, domination by the Fujiwaras had waned and political power had shifted from the nobility in Kyoto to military landowners in the provinces.
www.metmuseum.org /toah/hd/heia/hd_heia.htm   (612 words)

  
 Ancient Japan - 3
From the 10th century and through the 11th, successive generations of the northern branch of the Fujiwara clan continued to control the nation's government by monopolizing the posts of sessho and kampaku, and the wealth that poured into their coffers enabled them to lead lives of the greatest brilliance.
The powerful authority wielded by the Fujiwara regents was maintained by their maternal relationship to successive emperors; once such a relationship disappeared, their power was bound to weaken.
Their fame as a warrior clan was greatly heightened in the mid-11th century when they quelled a rebellion in northeastern Japan.
www.crystalinks.com /japan3.html   (4328 words)

  
 CalendarHome.com - - Calendar Encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: )
The five Fujiwara families, Ichijo, Kujo, Nijo, Konoe and Takatsukasa, were the primary source of imperial brides from the 8th century to the 19th century, even more often than daughters of the imperial clan itself.
Fujiwara daughters were thus the usual empresses and mothers of emperors.
The acceptable source of imperial wives, brides for the emperor and crown prince, were even legislated into the Meiji-era imperial house laws (1889), which stipulated that daughters of Sekke (the five main branches of the higher Fujiwara) and daughters of the imperial clan itself were primarily acceptable brides.
encyclopedia.calendarhome.com /cgi-bin/encyclopedia.pl?p=Emperor_of_Japan   (4197 words)

  
 Samurai Rising
During the tenth and eleventh centuries, the Fujiwara family lived in the cultural limelight, all the while holding a firm grip on the reins of power in Heian-kyo.
Unlike the capital aristocracy, the provincial clan aristocrats were quite self-sufficient and seemed content to leave the imperial government alone so long as they could continue to control the peasants on their estates and organize their armed cliques for local self-defense without interference from the capital.
The Minamoto clan's prestige was still strong in the Kanto region and, in the provinces at least, men believed a local military leader would be more likely to respect and protect their interests and property rights than would a distant court aristocrat like the military dictator Taira Kiyomori.
koreanhistoryproject.org /Ket/C05/E0504.htm   (3097 words)

  
 History : History and Tradition
By the 12th century, the Fujiwara clan based in Hiraizumi in what is now Iwate Prefecture had become the dominant power in northeastern Japan, while the Taira clan, relatives of the Imperial family by marriage, held the reins of the central government.
The Aizu clan's founder was Masayuki Hoshina, a younger half brother of the third Tokugawa shogun.
Clans from southern and western Japan sought to overthrow the shogunate and re-establish a national government centered on the Emperor.
www.pref.fukushima.jp /list_e/hstrd_le.html   (1163 words)

  
 Japan to 1615 by Sanderson Beck
The power of the Fujiwara clan increased by marrying their daughters to emperors and by means of their great wealth and estates in the provinces.
Emperor Takakura abdicated and was succeeded by the infant Antoku.
Her father Tametoki was in the Fujiwara clan and became governor of Echizen about 996 and later of Echigo; in 1016 he retired from government and became a Buddhist priest, outliving his daughter Murasaki.
www.san.beck.org /3-11-Japanto1615.html   (0 words)

  
 Japan the Fujiwara Regency
As the Soga had taken control of the throne in the sixth century, the Fujiwara by the ninth century had intermarried with the imperial family, and one of their members was the first head of the Emperor's Private Office.
Another Fujiwara became regent for his grandson, then a minor emperor, and yet another was appointed kanpaku (regent for an adult emperor).
Despite their usurpation of imperial authority, the Fujiwara presided over a period of cultural and artistic flowering at the imperial court and among the aristocracy.
www.country-studies.com /japan/the-fujiwara-regency.html   (1040 words)

  
 Kofuku-ji Temple: A World Cultural Heritage Site in Nara, Japan’s Ancient Capital
Fujiwara Fuhito was a leader of the Fujiwara clan, that made its debut on ancient Japan’s political stage in the mid-7th century, subsequently becoming a dominant power.
Even though Kofuku-ji was a private clan temple, its construction involved the national government, which provided both financial and technological support in obligation of the kinship ties between the Fujiwara clan and the imperial family.
During the latter half of the 8th century, however, the Fujiwara clan enshrined their tutelary deity and unified the Shrine with Kofuku-ji, in accordance with the prevailing theological idea of the time that Shinto deities and Buddha existed as one body (a blending of Buddhism and Shintoism).
www.nara.accu.or.jp /english/newsletter/news6/p6.html   (1021 words)

  
 feudaljapan.html
Their power was replaced by that of the provincial lords, who were descended from the old clan lords or court nobility that had left the capital.
century, the fighting culminated in two major wars between rival clans that were both descended from junior branches of the imperial lines — court nobility who had left the capital early on to make their fortunes in the provinces.
The end of the bakufu came in 1333, when the Hojo family was exterminated by a rival clan, and this action brought the first phase of Japanese feudal age to an end.
www.loyno.edu /~seduffy/feudaljapan.html   (0 words)

  
 JAPAN LINK | leute | Der FUJIWARA Clan (Seite 1 von 3)
Die FUJIWARA erkannten das Machtpotential von matrimoniellen Verbindungen zum Kaiserhaus und nutzten diese Erkenntnis konsequent.
Durch den üblichen Einsatz von Intrigen zur Interessensdurchsetzung entstand eine fließende Grenze zwischen Diplomatie und Intrige.
Eine weitere Machtstrategie der FUJIWARA bestand darin, einen mündigen Tenno zum Abdanken zu zwingen und einen Kindkaiser auf den Thron zu setzen.
www.japanlink.de /ll/ll_leute_fujiwara.shtml   (0 words)

  
 Feudal Notes
By the ninth century, however, the Fujiwara clan gained undue influence over a successive line of emperors, due to advantages marriages and other relations as well a period in which there was a quick turnover in the imperial seat, due early deaths and sudden abdications.
In the end, the Minamoto clan was rendered leaderless, with the death of Yoshitomo and the banishment to the east of his then fourteen-year old son, Yoritomo.
A noble warrior and forceful, talented leader; his sudden death was considered a sign of the coming end of the Taira as the negative karma accrued by the father was suffered by the son.
home.att.net /~idg_asia/feudal.html   (1639 words)

  
 Hiraizumi Guide - Japan Reference
At the heights of the Heian period (794-1185), the Northern branch of the powerful Fujiwara clan created political and cultural center that was said to rival Heian-kyo (Kyoto) itself.
Three generation of Fujiwara ruled Hiraizumi from 1089 to 1189, until Minamoto Yoritomo overthrew the hegemony of the Fujiwara, bringing the Heian era to an end.
The coffins, funeral adornments, katana and various images of Fujiwara clan are preserved in the Sankozo Treasury.
www.jref.com /practical/hiraizumi.shtml   (0 words)

  
 Station 23 - Hiraizumi Discussion
Kiyohira was the son of Fujiwara Tsunekiyo and his mother was the daughter of Abe Yoritoki.
The prosperity of the Fujiwara family, the activities of Yoshitsune and his followers were both glorious endeavors and yet both came to nothing in the end.
The mansions of the Fujiwara "had been reduced to fields" and "only Kikeizan remained" and "the grass grew green." In this description Basho is using the conventions of the old Chinese poem.
darkwing.uoregon.edu /~kohl/basho/23-hiraizumi/discussion.html   (3448 words)

  
 Japanese history: Nara, Heian Periods
The Fujiwara family controlled the political scene of the Heian period over several centuries through strategic intermarriages with the imperial family and by occupying all the important political offices in Kyoto and the major provinces.
The power of the clan reached its peak with Fujiwara Michinaga in the year 1016.
The Fujiwara supremacy came to an end in 1068 when the new emperor Go-Sanjo was determined to rule the country by himself, and the Fujiwara failed to control him.
www.japan-guide.com /e/e2132.html   (0 words)

  
 Japanese History | History of Japan :: Japan Visitor
In Japan in 587AD the Soga clan was victorious in a civil war defeating its rivals the Mononobe and Nakatomi clan and heralding the formal acceptance of Buddhism which it had overseen the introduction of from the mainland.
He founded a new clan, the Fujiwara, that would rise to dizzying heights of wealth and power for centuries to come.) Furthermore, in 646 Emperor Kotoku began the Taika Reform, reinforcing the power of the throne by further pursuing the trend of sinofication.
But since the imperial government was controlled by the Fujiwara, no amount of efficiency and talent in anyone not born to the Fujiwara clan could earn him any advantage from the system.
www.japanvisitor.com /index.php?cID=359&pID=334&cName=Japanese   (5178 words)

  
 A Concise History of Japan
The three clans pooled their resources to put down revolts, and the Minamoto were especially good at chasing clerical hoodlums back to their monasteries.
But after a while different branches of the Fujiwara clan began to plot against each other, and at a critical time the leading branch of the family failed to produce enough daughters to keep all male members of the imperial family safely supplied with Fujiwara wives.
One Fujiwara patriarch, Fujiwara Michinaga (966-1027), was the brother of two empresses and the father of four, the uncle of two emperors, the grandfather of two more, and the great-grandfather of another!
xenohistorian.faithweb.com /neasia/japan.html   (19507 words)

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