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Topic: Further and Higher Education Act, 1992


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In the News (Wed 21 Aug 19)

  
  Higher Education Funding Council for England - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The Higher Education Funding Council for England (HEFCE) is a non-departmental public body of the Department for Education and Skills in the United Kingdom which distributes funding to Universities and Colleges of Higher and Further Education in England since 1992.
It was created by the Further and Higher Education Act 1992.
In addition to distributing both teaching and research funding to higher education institutions HEFCE is also involved with: widening participation; developing links between higher education institutions and business and the community; and enhancing leadership, governance and management within the sector.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Higher_Education_Funding_Council_for_England   (269 words)

  
 Study Abroad England - Take part in a Study Abroad Program with TWO WORLDS UNITED Educational Foundation
Higher education is provided by three main types of institutions: universities, colleges and institutions of higher education and art and music colleges.
As a result of the Further and Higher Education Act of 1992, the binary line separating universities and polytechnics was abolished and polytechnics were given university status (i.e., the right to award their own degrees) and took university titles.
This provision is funded by the Higher Education Funding Councils and the Department of Education Northern Ireland.
www.highereducation.twoworldsunited.org /higher_education_england.html   (452 words)

  
 Further and Higher Education Act 1992 (c. 13)
Acts of Parliament printed from this website are printed under the superintendence and authority of the Controller of HMSO being the Queen's Printer of Acts of Parliament.
Further information about the publication of legislation on this website can be found by referring to the Frequently Asked Questions.
Transfer of higher education institutions to further education sector.
www.hmso.gov.uk /acts/acts1992/Ukpga_19920013_en_1.htm   (568 words)

  
 DfES, FURTHER EDUCATION COLLEGES: Guidance
As far as Further Education is concerned, this section clarifies the powers of the Secretary of State under section 7(1) of the Further Higher Education Act 1992 to impose conditions on the grant paid to the FEFC.
Further Education Colleges may be involved in the provision of such study or training.
Section 36 amends section 3 of the Further and Higher Education Act 1992 to allow the funding councils for England and Wales to provide facilities for education for the population of their area when not required to do so, or for other persons.
www.dfes.gov.uk /fecguide/annexb.shtml   (1308 words)

  
 Higher Education News
The Secretary of State for Education and Employment is responsible for all aspects and levels of education in England, and for university education in Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland.
Higher education in the United Kingdom is now provided in two types of institutions: universities and colleges of higher education.
The Further and Higher Education Act of 1992 led to the dissolution of the Council for National Academic Awards (CNAA) which validated the degree awards of the then polytechnics.
www2.unescobkk.org /education/aceid/higher-edu/Handbook/HB_UK.htm   (4206 words)

  
 Higher education act, anti trust act, rave act   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-31)
Higher Education Act 2004 The Higher Education Act 2004 is an Act of Parliament of the British Parliament which sets up the framework for variable.
Higher Education Amendment Act 55 of 1999, Higher Education Amendment Act 54 of 2000,.
Further and Higher Education Act, 1992 The Further and Higher Education Acts 1992 made changes in the funding and administration of further education.
www.school-education.org /act/higher_education_act.html   (327 words)

  
 Cumper and Rodgers, [1997] 3 Web JCLI
Higher Education and the Disability Discrimination Act 1995
The purpose of the Act is (inter alia) to establish funding councils for the two sectors, with the responsibility of allocating funds to Further and Higher Education institutions by way of grant (sections 1, 5, 6 and 7).
Of course if the Disability Discrimination Act was extended to education in the same way as it covers access to goods and services, the rights of disabled people would be far from absolute and universities and colleges of Higher Education would only have been obliged to make "reasonable" arrangements and modifications to their institutions.
webjcli.ncl.ac.uk /1997/issue3/cumper3.html   (4153 words)

  
 UNISON Scotland Further Education Funding Council Briefing No 55   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-31)
Further education colleges employ over 12,000 full time equivalent staff, 54% of who are involved in teaching.
The Council is responsible for funding further education in Scotland.
It is empowered by the Further and Higher Education (Scotland) Act 1992 to do all that is necessary or expedient to secure adequate and efficient provision of further education in Scotland, to the extent that it can within its powers delegated by the Scottish Ministers.
www.unison-scotland.org.uk /briefings/sfedc.html   (724 words)

  
 Further and Higher Education (Scotland) Act 1992 (c. 37)
Further and Higher Education (Scotland) Act 1992 (c. 37)
Duty of Secretary of State to secure provision of further education.
Transfer of colleges of further education not under local authority management.
www.opsi.gov.uk /acts/acts1992/Ukpga_19920037_en_1.htm   (481 words)

  
 OG 48 C1 - Students' unions: Specified institutions (establishments to which Part II of the Education Act 1994 applies)
The institutions to which Part II of the 1994 Act applies are broadly universities and colleges of further and higher education which are (at least in part) publicly funded.
(Higher education corporations are bodies established to run LEA institutions whose main purpose is the provision of sufficient advanced further education courses to satisfy s.121(2) of the Education Reform Act 1988.)
(These are institutions outside the further education sector which provide part-time or adult further education and rely for more than 25% of their income on further education council funding via a sponsoring institution within the further education sector.
www.charity-commission.gov.uk /supportingcharities/ogs/g048c001.asp   (487 words)

  
 STRUCTURE OF EDUCATION SYSTEM IN THE UNITED KINGDOM
Non-university level post-secondary technical education is provided by technical colleges, colleges of further and higher education and accredited independent colleges which offer a large number of vocational courses leading to a professional qualification.
Extra-mural education is provided by universities or other institutions of higher education to adults living in the region served by the institutions and who do not belong to the regular student body.
Higher education institutions may also choose to offer courses that are specifically intended to meet the needs of the local community.
www.euroeducation.net /prof/ukco.htm   (2361 words)

  
 Further education for people with learning difficulties
The Further and Higher Education Act (1992) (the FHE Act) introduced great changes to the way in which continuing education was delivered in colleges and local education authorities across England and Wales.
Two Further Education Funding Councils were set up, one each in England and Wales, to fund college provision and to monitor the quality of the provision.
The importance of education for adults with learning difficulties is recognised in the FHE Act and consequently has attracted resources from the two Further Education Funding Councils for Schedule 2 work in colleges and Local Education Authorities.
www.jrf.org.uk /knowledge/findings/socialcare/sc85.asp   (1768 words)

  
 Further education for people with learning disabilities, a factsheet from the Foundation for People with Learning ...   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-31)
The Further and Higher Education Act (1992) placed funding on a more secure footing, encouraged more integrated provision, financed more support services, and increased the learning opportunities for people with moderate learning disabilities.
Bringing together further education, adult education and training within a single body - the proposed National Learning and Skills Council - should benefit people with learning disabilities, particularly in terms of their progression from one area of learning to another and linking education with training and employment.
The extension of the Disability Discrimination Act to cover educational provision is a further positive move, as colleges will be required to demonstrate that they have made "reasonable adjustments" to accommodate people with disabilities.
www.learningdisabilities.org.uk /page.cfm?pagecode=ISEEFEMT&print=1   (531 words)

  
 Higher Education Resource Hub
Organization of the nation's largest urban public school systems advocating K-12 education in inner-city schools and governed by superintendents and board of education members from 50 cities across the country.
The Council is concerned with the funding of colleges and institutions of higher education and universities in Wales, and has the power to fund higher education in further education colleges.
Established in June 1992 under the Further and Higher Education (Scotland) Act to provide financial support for teaching, research, and associated activities in Scottish higher education institutions.
www.higher-ed.org /policy.htm   (736 words)

  
 Higher Education - Further And Higher Education Act 1992   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-31)
The FHEA 1992 is the Further and Higher Education Act 1992. Financial Services Authority (FSA). The Financial Services Authority was established by the ...
The curriculum is determined by the Primary Education Act, while regulations ... Most of the short and medium-term further and higher education courses were ...
... of Burnley College is conferred by the relevant statutes, in particular the Education Reform Act 1988, and the Further and Higher Education Act 1992. ...
www.get-higher-education.com /furtherandhighereducationact1992   (507 words)

  
 e-Government: Higher Education Funding Council for England gets new board members
The Higher Education Funding Council for England was established on 6 May 1992 under the terms of the Further and Higher Education Act 1992 and assumed responsibility for funding higher education in England on 1 April 1993, succeeding the Universities Funding Council and the Polytechnics and Colleges Funding Council.
The HEFCE's main functions are to advise the Secretary of State for Education and Skills on the funding needs of higher education institutions in England and to distribute available funds.
In 2004-05 the HEFCE is distributing over 5 billion to support teaching and research in 132 institutions of higher education and of higher education courses at 201 further education colleges.
www.publictechnology.net /print.php?sid=1524   (681 words)

  
 ELWa - Higher Education Funding Council for Wales
The Higher Education Funding Council for Wales (HEFCW) is an Assembly Sponsored Public Body established in May 1992 under the Further and Higher Education Act 1992.
The Council assumed responsibility for the funding of higher education in Wales in April 1993.
The Council is responsible, under the Education Act 1994, for the funding of initial teaching training for school teachers and the accreditation of providers of initial teacher training in Wales.
www.elwa.org.uk /ElwaWeb/printer.aspx?pageid=458   (177 words)

  
 Higher Education
The Privy Council is also responsible, under the Further and Higher Education Act 1992, for approving the use of the word 'university' (including 'university college') in the title of a higher education institution, and may also approve an institution as competent to grant degrees.
The National Committee of Inquiry into Higher Education (commonly known as the Dearing Report) made a number of recommendations in 1997 and the Government published its response in 1998.
In addition, the title of 'university college' is to be available not only to colleges which are fully part of a university but also to higher education institutions with the power to award taught degrees.
www.privy-council.org.uk /output/page27.asp   (509 words)

  
 Managing tutorial provision in further education
Writers such as Alexiadou (2001) have pointed to the development of a 'quasi-market' within Further Education whose characteristics are 'defined by the nature of the competition instigated by the funding formula, and the central control of the created competing units through the use of both funding and incentive-based performance targets' (Alexiadou, op cit, p 415).
The new funding regime tore up this secure existence...It is in the area of funding that the 1992 Act has had its greatest impact, so that it is not an exaggeration to say that changes in the management, the organisation and the student experience of further education have been driven by the changes in funding.
The relationship between tutor and student within a Further Education context illustrates the issues raised here well, in that the tutor is not necessarily the sole, or even the major, arbiter of the decisions taken during this relationship.
www.leeds.ac.uk /educol/documents/00003248.htm   (6731 words)

  
 InterEdu - International Education Information Centre   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-31)
Following the implementation of the Further and Higher Education Act 1992, there is a single sector for all higher educationinstitutions in England and another in Wales.
The committee was asked to make recommendations on how the shape, structure, sizeand funding of higher education, including support for students, should develop to meet the needs of the UK over the next twenty years.
The Committee also made a number of recommendations concerning funding of higher education, including a proposal that full-time students in higher education should pay some of the costs of their tuition fees.
www.interedu.com /include.php3?file=mbbcudb0   (301 words)

  
 [No title]   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-31)
The Welsh Assembly has defended its higher education policies, saying it was committed to bi-lingualism.
Dr Jones said: "Very few seem prepared to recognise how damaging the failure of the higher education sector to take the Welsh language seriously is for the future of Welsh as a living and viable language.
Dr Jones urged education minister Jane Davidson to study the research assessment on Welsh universities "very carefully, because understanding it also means understanding why their policies on higher education are more or less a total failure.
www.asu.edu /educ/epsl/LPRU/newsarchive/Art4513.txt   (354 words)

  
 JCEPS: Journal for Critical Education Policy Studies
FE funding bodies (the LSCs and before them the Further Education Funding Council (FEFC) and the Training and Enterprise Councils (TECs)) have historically distributed funds in order to facilitate the reorganisation of colleges so that they better serve the needs of local industry (see for example Department of Employment and Learning Northern Ireland(2001)).
While this may facilitate a flexible realignment of educational provision to the needs of local economies, it is also a strategic instrument for Principals to shape staffing profiles, to promote those with "preferred" values (Avis 2002, p346) and to implement "cultural change" (Jephcote 1996).
While educational processes are reduced to outcomes, a new and manipulative relationship between technical knowledge and teachers/managers is cultivated.
www.jceps.com /index.php?pageID=article&articleID=54   (5535 words)

  
 Higher Edu links   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-31)
The HEFCE was established in May 1992 under the Further and Higher Education Act 1992 as a non-departmental public body operating within the context of Government policy.
The Higher Education Statistics Agency was set up by the UK universities and higher education colleges to collect, analyse and report on HE statistics.
The Higher Education Funding Councils for England, Scotland and Wales distribute funds for the provision of education and the undertaking of research by higher education institutions.
www.netnexus.org /theme/hedu/hedulinks.htm   (413 words)

  
 NDPB 1997 Report - Higher Education Funding Council for England   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-31)
It assumed responsibility for funding higher education in England on 1 April 1993, succeeding the Polytechnics and Colleges Funding Council and the Universities Funding Council.
Its main statutory functions are to advise the Secretary of State for Education and Employment on the funding needs of higher education institutions in England and to distribute available funds.
Most departments were providing education of a very high quality and through a special initiative launched by the Council in 1996 these departments now have an opportunity to spread their good practice throughout the higher education sector.
www.archive.official-documents.co.uk /document/caboff/pubbod97/hefce.htm   (618 words)

  
 EXEMPT CHARITIES FURTHER EDUCATION CORPORATIONS OG 57 C3
Further education corporations (FECs) are bodies corporate which are established to conduct certain former local authority maintained educational institutions, county, controlled and grant-maintained schools specified by Order of the Secretary of State.
Their powers are laid down in ss.18 and 19 of the Further and Higher Education Act 1992 and they are governed by instruments and articles of government which must comply with the requirements of Schedule 4 to the Act.
FECs were formerly exempt charities under the provisions of paragraph (j) of Schedule 2 to the 1993 Act.
www.charity-commission.gov.uk /supportingcharities/ogs/g057c003.asp   (240 words)

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