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Topic: Fusional language


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In the News (Sun 16 Jun 19)

  
  Fusional language
A fusional language is a type of polysynthetic language, distinguished from agglutinative languages by its use of fewer morphemes for inflection or by its tendency to "squish together" many morphemes in a way which can be difficult to decode.
The canonical examples of fusional languages are Latin and German.
Esperanto, which is an artificial language based on many European languages, is a particularly clean and simple example of a fusional language.
www.ebroadcast.com.au /lookup/encyclopedia/fu/Fusional_language.html   (110 words)

  
 What is a fusional language?
A fusional language is a language in which one form of a morpheme can simultaneously encode several meanings.
Fusional languages may have a large number of morphemes in each word, but morpheme boundaries are difficult to identify because the morphemes are fused together.
The opposite of a highly fusional language is a highly agglutinative language.
www.sil.org /linguistics/GlossaryOfLinguisticTerms/WhatIsAFusionalLanguage.htm   (129 words)

  
  Chapter 6. Types of Linguistic Structure. Edward Sapir. 1921. Language: An Introduction to the Study of Speech   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-04)
Aside from the expression of pure relation a language may, of course, be “formless”—formless, that is, in the mechanical and rather superficial sense that it is not encumbered by the use of non-radical elements.
Those languages that always identify the word with the radical element would be set off as an “isolating” group against such as either affix modifying elements (affixing languages) or possess the power to change the significance of the radical element by internal changes (reduplication; vocalic and consonantal change; changes in quantity, stress, and pitch).
Languages are in constant process of change, but it is only reasonable to suppose that they tend to preserve longest what is most fundamental in their structure.
www.bartleby.com /186/6.html   (7279 words)

  
 Morphology - FrathWiki   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-04)
According to this typology, some languages are isolating, and have little or no morphology; others are agglutinative, and their words tend to have lots of easily-separable morphemes; while yet others are fusional, because their inflectional morphemes are said to be "fused" together.
The classic example of an isolating language is Chinese; the classic example of an agglutinative language is Turkish; both Latin and Greek are classic examples of fusional languages.
Languages may be classified as synthetic or analytic in their word formation, depending on the preferred way of expressing notions that are not inflectional: either by using word-formation (synthetic), or by using syntactic phrases (analytic).
wiki.frath.net /Morphology   (2389 words)

  
 Agglutinative language - Wikinfo
The opposite of a synthetic language is an analytic, or isolating language.
Synthetic languages which are not agglutinative are called fusional languages; they combine morphemes by "squeezing" them together, often changing the morphemes drastically in the process.
Examples of agglutinative languages are Finnish, Hungarian, Inuktitut, Japanese, Korean, Greek, Latin, Swahili, Turkish, and to a lesser extent German, Dutch and Esperanto.
www.wikinfo.org /wiki.php?title=Agglutinative_language   (949 words)

  
 Inflection Encyclopedia Article @ Thereupon.org   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-04)
Languages are broadly classified morphologically into analytic and synthetic categories, or more realistically along a continuum between the two extremes.
Analytic languages isolate meaning into individual words, whereas synthetic languages create words not found in the dictionary by fusing or agglutinating morphemes, sometimes to the extent of having a whole sentence's worth of meaning in a single word.
Basque, a language isolate, is an extremely inflected language, heavily inflecting both nouns and verbs.
www.thereupon.org /encyclopedia/Inflection   (1953 words)

  
 Portuguese language information - Search.com
It is the official language of Angola, Brazil, Cape Verde, Guinea-Bissau, Mozambique, Portugal and São Tomé and Príncipe, co-official with Chinese in the Chinese S.A.R. of Macau, and co-official with Tetum in East Timor.
The language began to diverge from other Romance languages after the fall of the Western Roman Empire and the barbarian invasions in the 5th century, and started to be used in written documents around the 9th century.
From 711, with the Moorish invasion of the Peninsula, Arabic was adopted as the administrative language in the conquered regions.
www.search.com /reference/Portuguese_language   (5726 words)

  
 fusional language Information Center - fusional language
A fusional language is a type of synthetic language, distinguished from agglutinative languages by its tendency to "squish together" many morphemes in a way which can be difficult to segment.
The canonical examples of fusional languages are Latin and German, with Dutch as a close follow-up.
In the regular verb Hablar, meaning "to speak," the singular first-person present tense of the verb is hablo, the -o denoting the singular first-person present tense.
www.scipeeps.com /Sci-Linguistic_Topics_Cr_-_G/fusional_language.html   (154 words)

  
 Agglutinative language - Article from FactBug.org - the fast Wikipedia mirror site
Synthetic languages which are not agglutinative are called fusional languages; they sometimes combine affixes by "squeezing" them together, often changing them drastically in the process, and joining several meanings in one affix (for example, a single short verbal suffix means "past tense, perfect aspect, first person singular").
Agglutinative languages are not entirely grouped by the family (although Finnish and Hungarian are related, as are possibly Japanese and Korean).
It is possible that convergent evolution had many separate languages develop this property, but there seems to exist a preferred evolutionary direction from agglutinative synthetic languages to fusional synthetic languages, and then to non-synthetic languages, which in their turn evolve again into agglutinative synthetic languages.
www.factbug.org /cgi-bin/a.cgi?a=3224   (467 words)

  
 German language - Facts, Information, and Encyclopedia Reference article
German is the third most taught foreign language worldwide, also in the USA (after Spanish and French); it is the second most known foreign language in the EU (after English; see [1]) It is one of the official languages of the European Union.
This language was based on Eastern Upper and Eastern Central German dialects and preserved much of the grammatical system of Middle High German (unlike the spoken German dialects in Central and Upper Germany that already at that time began to lose the genitive case and the preterit tense).
German used to be the language of commerce and government in the Habsburg Empire, which encompassed a large area of Central and Eastern Europe.
www.startsurfing.com /encyclopedia/g/e/r/German_language.html   (3592 words)

  
 Edward Sapir: Language: Chapter 6: Types of Linguistic Structure   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-04)
Moreover, the historical study of language has proven to us beyond all doubt that a language changes not only gradually but consistently, that it moves unconsciously from one type towards another, and that analogous trends are observable in remote quarters of the globe.
Aside from the expression of pure relation a language may, of course, be "formless"-formliess, that is, in the mechanical and rather superficial sense that it is not encumbered by the use of non-radical elements.
In the isolating languages the syntactic relations are ex pressed by the position of the words in the sentence This is also true of many languages of type B, the terns "agglutinative," "fusional," and "symbolic" applying in their case merely to tine treatment of the derivational, not the relational, concepts.
spartan.ac.brocku.ca /~lward/Sapir/Sapir_1921/Sapir_1921_06.html   (7455 words)

  
 India, Indian States, India States, Indian hotels, Indian News and Indian Tourism, India Travel
A fusional language (also called inflecting language) is a type of synthetic language, distinguished from agglutinative languages by its tendency to "squish together" many morphemes in a way which can be difficult to segment.
A feature that distinguishes fusional languages from agglutinating ones is the occurrence of irregular forms: this wouldn\'t happen in an agglutinating language since the synthetic elements retain a meaning of their own.
Fusional languages are generally believed to have descended from agglutinating languages, though there is no linguistic evidence in the form of attested language changes to confirm this view.
www.delhiin.com /wiki-Fusional_languages   (923 words)

  
 What is Morphology?
The rules of morphology within a language tend to be relatively regular, so that if one sees the noun morphemes for the first time, for example, one can deduce that it is likely related to the word morpheme.
One type of polysynthetic language is a fusional or inflected language, in which morphemes are squeezed together and often changed dramatically in the process.
In morphology, this is because the languages become creolized as various pidgins used for communicating between disparate groups become natively spoken, and inter-communication in the pidgins is facilitated by dropping inflections.
www.wisegeek.com /what-is-morphology.htm   (474 words)

  
 The Grammar of the Trurian Language   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-04)
Trurian (Trursonne or Trursonnaí) is an inflecting, fusional, SOV language, spoken by the Trurian people in the country of Truria, which is a medium-sized kingdom in northern Carbia (the south-eastern fifth of the Continent).
Designing it, I pay attention both to the cultural background in which the language is spoken and the language's cognitive aspects; many colloquialisms are carefully recorded in my notes.
Trurian is a member of the Carbian language family, for which a number of other languages have already been sketched and await further elaboration.
www.angelfire.com /la3/jonafras/mtrurian.html   (256 words)

  
 [No title]   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-04)
Morphological Types of languages According to the way in which morphemes are put together (1) to form new words and (2) to express grammatical relations, languages can be classifies into two basic types: analytic and synthetic, the latter having several subtypes.
Hungarian, Swahili, Japanese and Korean are agglutinating languages.
Spanish is a fusional language that has the same suffix attached to the verb stem to indicate the person and number of the subject and the tense and aspect of the verb in the same time.
jyhan.myweb.uga.edu /notes/jan/018.doc   (264 words)

  
 Korean schools
The Korean language is the official language of both North and South Korea.
Korean is similar to Altaic languages in that they both have the absence of certain grammatical elements, including number, gender, articles, fusional morphology, voice, and relative pronouns (Kim Namkil).
The standard language (pyojuneo or pyojunmal) of South Korea is based on the dialect of the area around Seoul, and the standard for North Korea is based on the dialect spoken around P'yongyang.
www.aboutlanguageschools.com /language/korean   (609 words)

  
 Analytic language - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
An analytic language (or isolating language) is a language in which the vast majority of morphemes are free morphemes and are considered to be full-fledged "words".
By contrast, in a synthetic language, a word is composed of agglutinated or fused morphemes that denote its syntactic meanings.
Analytic languages tend to rely heavily on context and pragmatic considerations for the interpretation of sentences, since they don't specify as much as synthetic languages in terms of agreement and cross-reference between different parts of the sentence.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Isolating_language   (558 words)

  
 Sept 17
- In languages that have ergative-absolutive case marking, the object of a transitive verb and the subject of an intransitive verb have the same morphological marking (in absolutive case).
In addition, in Noun Incorporation, the incorporated noun may correspond to a complement or object of the verb (a form that is syntactic in English and perhaps, optionally, in that language).
Languages are constantly adding new words to their lexicons.
www.sfu.ca /~dmellow/ling32303/sept17.html   (1895 words)

  
 Inflection   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-04)
All Indo-European languages, such as English, German, Russian, Spanish, French, and Hindi are inflected to a greater or lesser extent.
The Dravidian languages are highly inflected, as well as the Finno-Ugric languages and most Amerind languages.
Although Old English was an inflected language, Modern English is considered a weakly inflected language, since its nouns have only vestiges of inflection (plurals, the pronouns), and its regular verbs have only 2 inflections: Third person singular, and everything else.
inflection.kiwiki.homeip.net   (1420 words)

  
 Fusional language - Wikinfo
A fusional language is a type of synthetic language, distinguished from agglutinative languages by its use of fewer morphemes for inflection or by its tendency to "squish together" many morphemes in a way which can be difficult to decode.
Esperanto, which is a construction language based in part on many European languages, is a particularly clean and simple example of a fusional language.
The ending -o denotes indicative mood, first person, singular, present tense.
www.wikinfo.org /wiki.php?title=Fusional_language   (592 words)

  
 Learn Turkish - Lesson 1   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-04)
Turkish is the principle language in a group of eight languages, known as the Turkic group: Azerbaijani, Kazakh, Kyrgyz, Tatar, Turkish, Turkmen, Uighur & Uzbek.
Turkic languages are thus spoken by hundreds of millions of people, from Belgrade in the Balkans to Xinjiang in Western China.
In a synthetic language, the form of each word changes according to tense, person, etc; whereas in an analytic (isolating) language the differences in form have disappeared, and meaning is thus conveyed by the presence and order of words, all of which appear isolated from one another.
lavocah.org /turkce/turkce.html   (416 words)

  
 Synthetic language   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-04)
Category:Linguistic typology A synthetic language is one with a high morpheme-to-word ratio.
Synthetic languages would thus be placed at the median point of this scale, and thus it should be clear that there is no hard and fast boundary between these classifications.
Even her daughter might escape faults--perhaps because of his very faults--and might drag on a weary comforts and mental ease, and her husband was doomed to go on from bad to daughter, that child whom she had brought up with the tenderest care, admission to the room where Micheline was in agony.
synthetic-language.kiwiki.homeip.net   (525 words)

  
 1
Furthermore, when an example of the phenomenon from a given language is presented for matching, be able to indicate whether the example involves Inflection (I), Compounding (C), Derivation [or another type of word-formation other than compounding] (D), or whether these distinctions are Not Applicable (NA).
Be prepared to match terms with language data in which the concept is identified.
After you have identified the concepts exemplified in various sets of language data, be prepared to indicate whether each example involves Inflection (I), Compounding (C), Derivation (D), or whether these distinctions are Not Applicable (NA) to the example at hand.
www2.hawaii.edu /~bender/final99.html   (749 words)

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