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Topic: GNU Lesser General Public License


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In the News (Sat 22 Jun 19)

  
  Licenses - GNU GPL, GNU LGPL, GNU FDL, General Public License, Lesser General Public License, Free Documentation ...
The GNU Free Documentation License is a form of copyleft intended for use on a manual, textbook or other document to assure everyone the effective freedom to copy and redistribute it, with or without modifications, either commercially or noncommercially.
The GNU Free Documentation License text in these formats: HTML, plain text, Docbook, Texinfo, and LaTeX These documents are not formatted for standalone publishing, and are intended to be included in another document.
In the GNU Project, the specific distribution terms that we use are contained in the GNU General Public License, the GNU Lesser General Public License and the GNU Free Documentation License.
www.gnu.org /licenses/licenses.html   (1434 words)

  
  GNU Lesser General Public License - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
It was designed as a compromise between the strong-copyleft GNU General Public License and simple permissive licenses such as the BSD licenses and the MIT License.
GNU itself is a recursive acronym for "GNU's Not Unix".
The GNU Lesser General Public License was written in 1991 (and updated in 1999) by Richard Stallman, with legal advice from Eben Moglen.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/GNU_Lesser_General_Public_License   (647 words)

  
 GNU General Public License - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
In contrast, the end-user licenses that come with proprietary software rarely grant the end-user any rights (other than the right to use the software, although it is debatable whether one requires a license for use per se), and may even attempt to restrict activities normally permitted by law, such as reverse engineering.
It was based on a unification of similar licenses used for early versions of GNU Emacs, the GNU Debugger and the GNU Compiler Collection.
In some Common Law jurisdictions, the legal distinction between a license and a contract is an important one: contracts are enforceable by contract law, whereas the GPL, as a license, is enforced under the terms of copyright law.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/GNU_General_Public_License   (2969 words)

  
 Open Source Initiative OSI - The LGPL: Licensing | Open Source Initiative
Although the Lesser General Public License is Less protective of the users' freedom, it does ensure that the user of a program that is linked with the Library has the freedom and the wherewithal to run that program using a modified version of the Library.
For example, if a patent license would not permit royalty-free redistribution of the Library by all those who receive copies directly or indirectly through you, then the only way you could satisfy both it and this License would be to refrain entirely from distribution of the Library.
Many people have made generous contributions to the wide range of software distributed through that system in reliance on consistent application of that system; it is up to the author/donor to decide if he or she is willing to distribute software through any other system and a licensee cannot impose that choice.
www.opensource.org /licenses/lgpl-license.php   (3660 words)

  
 GNU General Public License - GNU Project - Free Software Foundation (FSF)
By contrast, the GNU General Public License is intended to guarantee your freedom to share and change all versions of a program--to make sure it remains free software for all its users.
A patent license is “discriminatory” if it does not include within the scope of its coverage, prohibits the exercise of, or is conditioned on the non-exercise of one or more of the rights that are specifically granted under this License.
The terms of this License will continue to apply to the part which is the covered work, but the special requirements of the GNU Affero General Public License, section 13, concerning interaction through a network will apply to the combination as such.
www.gnu.org /copyleft/gpl.html   (4245 words)

  
 Creative Commons GNU Lesser General Public License
Any translation of the GNU General Public License must be accompanied by the GNU General Public License.
This is a human-readable summary of the Legal Code (the full GNU Lesser General Public License).
This is a human-readable summary of the Legal Code (the full license).
creativecommons.org /licenses/LGPL/2.1   (311 words)

  
 GNU Lesser General Public License - GNU Project - Free Software Foundation (FSF)
As used herein, “this License” refers to version 3 of the GNU Lesser General Public License, and the “GNU GPL” refers to version 3 of the GNU General Public License.
If the Library as you received it specifies that a certain numbered version of the GNU Lesser General Public License “or any later version” applies to it, you have the option of following the terms and conditions either of that published version or of any later version published by the Free Software Foundation.
If the Library as you received it specifies that a proxy can decide whether future versions of the GNU Lesser General Public License shall apply, that proxy's public statement of acceptance of any version is permanent authorization for you to choose that version for the Library.
www.gnu.org /licenses/lgpl.html   (1242 words)

  
 GNU Lesser General Public License at opensource encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-27)
The GNU Lesser General Public License is an FSF approved Free Software license designed as a compromise between the GNU General Public License and simple permissive licenses such as the BSD license and the MIT License.
The license is only useful for software libraries; it was once called the GNU Library General Public License.
This article is licensed under the GNU Free Documentation License.
www.wiki.tatet.com /GNU_Lesser_General_Public_License.html   (270 words)

  
 OSS Watch - The GNU Lesser General Public License - An Overview
The GNU Lesser General Public License (LGPL for short) is a variation of the regular GNU General Public License (GPL).
Originally known as the GNU Library General Public License, it was drafted by the Free Software Foundation (FSF) to provide a weaker (or Lesser) form of copyleft for use in certain specific circumstances.
It is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 2.0 England and Wales licence.
www.oss-watch.ac.uk /resources/lgpl.xml?style=screen   (961 words)

  
 GPLv3 Draft — GPLv3
This License does not attempt to enforce your terms, or assert that they are valid or enforceable by you; it simply does not prohibit you from employing them.
This patent license is nonexclusive, royalty-free and worldwide, and covers all patent claims you control or have the right to sublicense, at the time you distribute the covered work or in the future, that would be infringed or violated by the covered work or any reasonably contemplated use of the covered work.
For example, if a patent license would not permit royalty-free redistribution by all those who receive copies directly or indirectly through you, then the only way you could satisfy both it and this License would be to refrain entirely from distribution.
gplv3.fsf.org /draft   (3802 words)

  
 [No title]
GNU LESSER GENERAL PUBLIC LICENSE Version 2.1, February 1999 Copyright (C) 1991, 1999 Free Software Foundation, Inc. 51 Franklin Street, Fifth Floor, Boston, MA 02110-1301, USA Everyone is permitted to copy and distribute verbatim copies of this license document, but changing it is not allowed.
It also counts as the successor of the GNU Library Public License, version 2, hence the version number 2.1.] Preamble The licenses for most software are designed to take away your freedom to share and change it.
You should have received a copy of the GNU Lesser General Public License along with this library; if not, write to the Free Software Foundation, Inc., 51 Franklin Street, Fifth Floor, Boston, MA 02110-1301, USA Also add information on how to contact you by electronic and paper mail.
www.fsf.org /licensing/licenses/lgpl.txt   (3594 words)

  
 FSF - GNU Lesser General Public License
This license is a set of additional permissions added to version 3 of the GNU General Public License.
As used herein, “this License” refers to version 3 of the GNU Lesser General Public License, and the “GNU GPL” refers to version 3 of the GNU General Public License.
Copyright © 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007 Free Software Foundation, Inc., 51 Franklin Street, Fifth Floor, Boston, MA 02110-1301, USA Verbatim copying and distribution of this entire article are permitted worldwide, without royalty, in any medium, provided this notice is preserved.
www.fsf.org /licensing/licenses/lgpl.html   (1284 words)

  
 GNU Lesser General Public License
The GNU Lesser General Public License is a software license designed as a compromise between the GNU General Public License and the simple permissive licenses of X Window System and BSD.
It places a copyleft restriction on individual source code files but does not copyleft the program as a whole.
The license is useful for software libraries; it was once called the GNU Library General Public License.
www.ebroadcast.com.au /lookup/encyclopedia/lg/LGPL.html   (67 words)

  
 GNU Lesser General Public License (LGPL)
You must cause the whole of the work to be licensed at no charge to all third parties under the terms of this License.
If distribution of object code is made by offering access to copy from a designated place, then offering equivalent access to copy the source code from the same place satisfies the requirement to distribute the source code, even though third parties are not compelled to copy the source along with the object code.
Give prominent notice with the combined library of the fact that part of it is a work based on the Library, and explaining where to find the accompanying uncombined form of the same work.
www.dreamsongs.com /IHE/IHE-98.html   (3486 words)

  
 GNU Lesser General Public License
"Licensable" means having the right to grant, to the maximum extent possible, whether at the time of the initial grant or subsequently acquired, any and all of the rights conveyed herein.
The Source Code version of Covered Code may be distributed only under the terms of this License or a future version of this License released under Section 6.1, and You must include a copy of this License with every copy of the Source Code You distribute.
Alternatively, the contents of this file may be used under the terms of the _____ license (the “[___] License”), in which case the provisions of [______] License are applicable instead of those above.
rail.dei.uc.pt /license.htm   (2253 words)

  
 License Page   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-27)
OpenOffice.org uses a single open-source license for the source code and a separate documentation license for most documents published on the website without the intention of being included in the product.
The source-code license is the GNU Lesser General Public License.
The document license is the Public Document License.
www.openoffice.org /license.html   (257 words)

  
 LGPL
The GNU Lesser General Public Licence (the LGPL) is a special software licence published by the Free Software Foundation.
This licence has been used for some of the programs and libraries that can be downloaded from this website (see also the ordinary General Public Licence).
You should have received a copy of the GNU Lesser General Public License along with this library; if not, write to the Free Software Foundation, Inc., 59 Temple Place, Suite 330, Boston, MA 02111-1307 USA
www.object-refinery.com /lgpl.html   (3782 words)

  
 Old Licenses - GNU Project - Free Software Foundation (FSF)
You can find current versions of the licenses on our licenses page.
This license used to be called the GNU Library General Public License:
Verbatim copying and distribution of this entire article are permitted worldwide, without royalty, in any medium, provided this notice, and the copyright notice, are preserved.
www.gnu.org /licenses/old-licenses/old-licenses.html   (214 words)

  
 GNU Lesser General Public License
Copyright (C) 1991, 1999 Free Software Foundation, Inc. 51 Franklin St, Fifth Floor, Boston, MA 02110-1301 USA Everyone is permitted to copy and distribute verbatim copies of this license document, but changing it is not allowed.
It also counts as the successor of the GNU Library Public License, version 2, hence the version number 2.1.]
It is the first graphical Java workflow process editor fully according to WfMC specifications supporting XPDL as its native file format.
www.enhydra.org /license/index.html   (3402 words)

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