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Topic: Gaia theory (science)


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  Gaia theory (science) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The Gaia hypothesis forms part of what is scientifically referred to as earth system science, is a class of scientific models of the geo-biosphere in which life as a whole fosters and maintains suitable conditions for itself by helping to create an environment on Earth suitable for its continuity.
This theory is based on the simple idea that the biomass self-regulates the conditions on the planet to make its physical environment (in particular temperature and chemistry of the atmosphere) on the planet more hospitable to the species which constitute its "life".
Ecologists generally consider the biosphere as an ecosystem and the Gaia hypothesis, though a simplification of that original proposed, to be consistent with a modern vision of global ecology, relaying the concepts of biosphere and biodiversity.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Gaia_theory_(science)   (4443 words)

  
 [No title]   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-06)
In science, a Gaia theory is a class of scientific models of the biosphere in which life fosters and maintains suitable conditions for itself by affecting Earth's environment.
Gaia theory today is a spectrum of hypotheses, ranging from the undeniable to the radical.
Gaia hypothesis led to the new science called biogeography, or even geophysiology, which take into account the interactions between biota, the oceans and the atmosphere.
wikiwhat.com /encyclopedia/g/ga/gaia_theory__science_.html   (2438 words)

  
 Encyclopedia :: encyclopedia : Gaia theory (science)   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-06)
Gaia theory is a class of scientific models of the geo-biosphere in which life as a whole fosters and maintains suitable conditions for itself by helping to create an environment on Earth suitable for its continuity.
The first such theory was created by the English independent atmospheric scientist and chemist, Sir James Lovelock, who developed his theories in the 1960s before formally publishing them, first in the New Scientist of February 13, 1975 and then in the 1979 book "Quest for Gaia".
During the Gaia conference, James Kirchner, a physicist and philosopher took the opportunity of the meeting to explain that there are not one Gaia hypothesis, but several ones ranging from "weak Gaia" to "strong Gaia".
www.hallencyclopedia.com /Gaia_theory_(science)   (2821 words)

  
 Gaia - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Gaia theory (science), a group of scientific theories about how life on Earth may regulate the planet's biosphere to make it more hospitable to life.
Gaia philosophy, a set of philosophical views based on Gaia theory and the concept of a "living planet".
Gaia (Asimov), a fictional planet in Isaac Asimov's Foundation Series and where all animals, plants, and even inanimate matter are telepathically connected, forming a single sentient planet-wide entity.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Gaia   (476 words)

  
 Gaia theory
The Gaia theory is a broadly inclusive name for a group of ideas that living organisms on a planet modify the nature of the planet to make it more suitable for life.
While there were a number of precursors to Gaia theory, the first scientific form of this idea was proposed as the Gaia Hypothesis by James Lovelock, a U.K. chemist, in 1970.
Gaia theory is a spectrum of hypotheses, ranging from the undeniable to radical.
www.ebroadcast.com.au /lookup/encyclopedia/ga/Gaia_theory.html   (3028 words)

  
 Gaia theory (science)
In science, a Gaia theory is a class of scientific model s of the biosphere in which life fosters and maintains suitable conditions for itself by affecting Earth's environment.
This theory is based on the idea that the biomass self-regulates the conditions on the planet to make its physical environment (in particular temperature and chemistry of the atmosphere) on the planet more hospitable to the species which constitute its "life".
Gaia hypothesis led to the new science called biogeography, or even geophysiology, which take into account the interactions between biota, the ocean s and the atmosphere.
www.nebulasearch.com /encyclopedia/article/Gaia_theory_(science).html   (2422 words)

  
 Gaia theory (science) - Biocrawler   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-06)
Gaia theory is a class of scientific models of the biosphere in which life fosters and maintains suitable conditions for itself by affecting Earth's environment.
The first such theory was created by the English atmospheric scientist, James Lovelock, who developed his theories in the 1960s before formally publishing them in 1979.
Gaia is just symbiosis as seen from space." – from Greenpeace (http://cybercentre.greenpeace.org//t/s//996755792/1007012854/1007026932/1013059381) apparently in reference to Lynn Margulis, Symbiotic Planet: A New View of Evolution.
www.biocrawler.com /encyclopedia/Gaia_theory_(science)   (2722 words)

  
 The Gaia Hypothesis   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-06)
The theory of plate tectonics, as it is now known, embodies a century or more of scientific research, bringing together the efforts of oceanographers, geophysicists, climatologists, palenotologists and more.
Lovelock defines Gaia "as a complex entity involving the Earth's biosphere, atmosphere, oceans, and soil; the totality constituting a feedback or cybernetic system which seeks an optimal physical and chemical environment for life on this planet." Through Gaia, the Earth sustains a kind of homeostasis, the maintenance of relatively constant conditions.
One of the biggest criticisms against the idea that Gaia is a "living" organism is the inability of the planet to reproduce.
www.oceansonline.com /gaiaho.htm   (4185 words)

  
 Lecture 1 - The Evolving Gaia Theory
The two theories, Hutton's and Darwin's, were radical and they appeared in a cultural environment where the scriptural dogma of the act of creation was still widely held to be true.
They are sometimes sufficiently irritated by Gaia theory to comment that the material conditions of the Earth were all explained completely by the abundance of oxygen and carbon dioxide in the air.
Gaia theory predicted that gaseous compounds of these elements would be dissolved in the ocean surface and present in the air above.
www.unu.edu /unupress/lecture1.html   (5212 words)

  
 What Is Gaia? Text by James Lovelock
Science becomes holistic again and rediscovers soul, and theology, moved by ecumenical forces, begins to realise that Gaia is not to be subdivided for academic convenience and that Ge is much more than just a prefix.
Gladly we accepted his suggestion and Gaia is also the name of the hypothesis of science which postulates that the climate and the composition of the Earth always are close to an optimum for whatever life inhabits it.
The evidence gathered in support of Gaia is now considerable but as is often the way of science, this is less important than is its use as a kind of looking glass for seeing the world diferently, and which makes us ask new questions about the nature of Earth.
www.ozi.com /ourplanet/lovelock2.html   (729 words)

  
 Gaia: The Wisdom of the Earth
The Gaia Theory, first proposed by British scientist James Lovelock in the early 1970's, is gaining an increasing number of advocates throughout the world's scientific community.
Gaian theory holds that the Earth can be described as a vast, autopoietic system of many components, all of which have evolved together to enhance and regulate conditions for the perpetuation of life.
Activities associated with Gaia include the construction and monitoring of environmental chambers containing plants and other organisms (including simple systems that can be enclosed in plastic bottles), outdoor environmental monitoring and sampling, and population studies with simple organisms such as earthworms, planaria, and pill bugs.
www.accessexcellence.org /AE/AEPC/WWC/1991/gaia.html   (1163 words)

  
 The Gaia Hypothesis - Dr James Lovelock & Dr Lynn Margulis
"Gaia theory is about the evolution of a tightly coupled system whose constituents are the biota and their material environment, which comprises the atmosphere, the oceans, and the surface rocks.
His contructive criticism was that the Gaia Hypothesis may be better viewed as a collection of related hypotheses, which could be classified within a spectrum from weak Gaia (which related to the known evidence of biochemical cycles) to strong (as a form of global physiology).
Earth System Science seeks to understand the mass and energy transfers among interacting components of the Earth System (biosphere, hydrophere, geosphere, atmosphere, and anthrosphere), which is not entirely synonymous to the the Gaia principle which purports that for practical purposes it may be useful to consider the earth as if it were a living organism.
www.mountainman.com.au /gaia_jim.html   (4580 words)

  
 Gaia Theory & Mother Earth   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-06)
The Gaia hypothesis, now Gaia theory, was invented by British atmospheric chemist James Lovelock and US microbiologist Lynn Margulis.
An evolving overview of Gaia theory, including what it is, evidence for existence of Gaia, scientific and philosophical implications, and a bibliography, is here.
That is, Gaia theory cannot even be discussed, let alone understood, without knowledge of complexity, especially the concept of autopoiesis.
www.prototista.org /E-Zine/GaiaTheoryMotherEarth.htm   (1586 words)

  
 On the Origins of the Universe, Gaia, and Our Magnetic Universe
Gaia theory (science) Much more speculative versions of Gaia theory, including all versions in which it is held that the Earth is actually conscious or part of some universe-wide evolution, are currently held to be outside the bounds of science.
The advocates of the stronger Gaia theory speak of cooperation and use examples of how life has actiively worked to change the biosphere (for example earth's atmosphere was created by small living organisms which changed the atmosphere from an earlier anaerobic state.
Gaia theory is a class of scientific models of the geo-biosphere in which life as as a whole fosters and maintains suitable conditions for itself by helping to create Earthan environment on suitable for its continuity...
www.awitness.org /column/origins_universe.html   (1905 words)

  
 Gaia Theory: Science of the Living Earth
The idea that the Earth was alive had been expressed several times before, but it gained special resonance in the early 60's because of the space flights which allowed the Earth to be viewed for the first time as a complete entity from outer space.
In a way these photographs were to the Gaia idea what computers were to chaos theory; they allowed one to see what was going on, and therefore brought the subject alive to a great many people.
Gaia theory has already had a huge impact on science, and has changed the way we view our place in the world.
www.gaianet.fsbusiness.co.uk /gaiatheory.html   (2673 words)

  
 Gaia theory
Another strong theory is the one called Omega Gaia.
Gaia is just symbiosis as seen from space." — from Greenpeace apparently in reference to Lynn Margulis, Symbiotic Planet: A New View of Evolution.
Lovelock, James, 2001, Homage to Gaia: The Life of an Independent Scientist ISBN 0198604297
www.ibpassociation.org /encyclopedia/Biology/Gaia_theory.php   (2814 words)

  
 Gaia Theory
He calls his theory Gaia (from the Greek goddess of Earth).
The theory, described in his 1979 book Gaia (5), can be paraphrased in different ways.
A social science view of Gaia theory is the role of humans as a keystone species who may be able to accomplish global homeostasis.
www.gaiatheory.info   (298 words)

  
 Gaia can refer to Gaia Gaia Greek and...   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-06)
The Gaia theory (science) Gaia theory (science), a group of scientific theories about how life on Earth may regulate the planet's biosphere to make it more hospitable to life.
Gaia philosophy Gaia philosophy – Varied philosophical views related to the Gaia theory.
Gaia Gaia is an imaginary planet set in Isaac Asimov Isaac Asimov's Foundation Series Foundation Series.
www.biodatabase.de /Gaia   (166 words)

  
 Gaia Theory   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-06)
In this book we find him putting forward the postulate:...the physical and chemical condition of the surface of the Earth, of the atmosphere, and of the oceans has been and is actively made fit and comfortable by the presence of life itself.
Nevertheless, the dominant paradigm in earth sciences has been that inexorable inorganic forces, such as changing energy output from the Sun, collisions of the Earth with extraterrestrial bodies, continental drift, or other orbital element variations have been the principal driving forces behind climate twenty years ago.
James Lovelock and Lynn Margulis coined the phrase the Gaia hypothesis to suggest not only that life has a greater influence on the evolution of the Earth than is typically assumed across most earth science disciplines but also that life serves as an active control system.
www.dalefield.com /Earth/gaia.html   (438 words)

  
 Amazon.com: Gaia : The Practical Science of Planetary Medicine : Books: James Lovelock   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-06)
Whilst I still think that the Gaia hypothesis is a fascinating idea and that Lovelock's book is well worth reading, I am now much more sceptical about the actual evidence for the hypothesis -- empirical evidence is, after all, the final and absolute test of a hypothesis in science.
The Gaia theory views the earth as a living, self-regulatory organism in which the evolution of life is closely coupled with the evolution of the climate.
The theory accounts for the remarkable ability of the biosphere to recover from planetary disasters such as the impact that killed the dinosaurs, and many other previously unexplained features of life on earth.
www.amazon.com /exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/0195216741?v=glance   (1166 words)

  
 The Gaia Theory   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-06)
The Gaia Theory is rather complex in its history and acceptance, or lack thereof, and we can only briefly explore this.
The Gaia Hypothesis - this is a very good site with a nice history of the origin of the hypothesis, its developmental history, some of the evidence for it, all laid out chronologically.
The Gaia Hypothesis, Autoevolution, and Deep Ecology - This is a nice site at the Arizona State University Libraries, with lots of links to brief synopses of various subjects on Gaia, and related topics.
csmres.jmu.edu /geollab/Fichter/GeoBio350/Gaia.html   (330 words)

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