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Topic: Galen


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In the News (Wed 26 Jun 19)

  
  Galen
Galen was born at Pergamum, Asia Minor on the 22 September 131 and was educated by his father, who decided his son should enter the medical profession.
Galen put forward the theory that illness was caused by an imbalance of the four humours: blood, phlegm, fl bile and yellow bile.
Galen catalogued in great detail various remedies including how each was made and the correct doses to be given.
www.zephyrus.co.uk /galen.html   (481 words)

  
  Galen 3   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Galen was seriously hampered by the prevailing social taboo against dissecting human corpses, however, and the inferences he made about human anatomy based on his dissections of animals often led him into errors.
Galen viewed the body as consisting of three connected systems: the brain and nerves, which are responsible for sensation and thought; the heart and arteries, responsible for life-giving energy; and the liver and veins, responsible for nutrition and growth.
Galen was also a skilled polemicist and an incorrigible publicist of his own genius, and these traits, combined with the enormous range of his writings, help to explain his subsequent fame and influence.
www.geocities.com /islampencereleri/galen_3.htm   (1357 words)

  
 Galen [Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy]
Galen was one of the most prominent ancient physicians as well as a philosopher (though most of his philosophical writings are lost).
Galen of Pergamum was a physician who was born around 129 A.D. Pergamum was a bustling and vibrant city at the time and was particularly famous for its statue of Asclepius, a god of healing.
Galen's observation of a fluid in the horns of the uterus (Kühn IV, 594, 600-601) were the basis of his (mistaken) view that he had discovered female seed.
www.utm.edu /research/iep/g/galen.htm   (4022 words)

  
 Galen
Galen believed that the authority of ancients was limited to the validity of their claims, and that, while their theories need not necessarily be replaced, they usually required clarification and progression.
Galen adopted Aristotle's theory of the four humors, which stated that the body is composed of a balance between the four elements present on earth- fire, earth, water, and air- which were manifested in the body as yellow bile, fl bile, water, and phlegm, respectively.
Galen shared his knowledge of anatomy with others by carefully recording his observations and techniques so as to help " 'all seriously interested in anatomy' " while ensuring that it was written " 'as clearly as possible for those who have never seen the operations' " (Temkin 12).
campus.udayton.edu /~hume/Galen/galen.htm   (3624 words)

  
 Galen OF PERGAMUM
Galen regarded anatomy as the foundation of medical knowledge, and he frequently dissected and experimented on such lower animals as the Barbary ape (or African monkey), pigs, sheep, and goats.
Galen viewed the body as consisting of three connected systems: the brain and nerves, which are responsible for sensation and thought; the heart and arteries, responsible for life-giving energy; and the liver and veins, responsible for nutrition and growth.
Galen was also a skilled polemicist and an incorrigible publicist of his own genius, and these traits, combined with the enormous range of his writings, help to explain his subsequent fame and influence.
www.spaceship-earth.org /Biograph/Galen.htm   (1503 words)

  
 Galen - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
In addition to working with pigs, Galen also experimented with barbary apes and goats, though he emphasised that he practised on pigs due to the fact that, in some respects, they are quite anatomically similar to humans.
Galen's authority dominated medicine all the way to the 16th century.
Most of Galen's Greek writings were first translated to the Syriac language by Nestorian monks in the Academy of Gundishapur, Persia.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Galen   (851 words)

  
 BBC - History - Claudius Galen (c.AD 129 - c.AD 216)
Galen was the originator of the experimental method in medical investigation, and throughout his life dissected animals in his quest to understand how the body functions.
Galen was prolific, with nearly 500 treatises to his name.
Galen's most lasting technique, one that survived his discreditation during the Renaissance, is the taking of the pulse - still done by doctors to this day.
www.bbc.co.uk /history/historic_figures/galen_claudius.shtml   (383 words)

  
 Pergamum and Troy, Turkey  -  Travel Photos by Galen R Frysinger, Sheboygan, Wisconsin
Galen was born of Greek parents in Pergamum, Asia Minor, which was then part of the Roman Empire.
Galen dissected many animals, particularly goats, pigs, and monkeys, to demonstrate how different muscles are controlled at different levels of the spinal cord.
Galen also described the valves of the heart and noted the structural differences between arteries and veins, but fell short of conceiving that the blood circulates.
www.galenfrysinger.com /pergamum_turkey.htm   (887 words)

  
 Galen 2
Galen firmly believed in what is known as humoral pathology: the science of the bodily fluids pioneered by the Greek physician Hippocrates (460 to 377 BC).
Drawing upon Hippocrates' theory regarding the four humours, Galen suggested the existence of four basic human temperaments, each of which was caused by a predominance of one of the four humours.
Galen distinguished between three types of spirit: the spiritus vitalis or life spirit, originating in the heart and flowing through the arteries; the spiritus animalis or animal spirit to be found in the brain and nerves; and the spiritus naturalis, or natural spirit, formed in the liver.
www.geocities.com /omermalik_2000/galen_2.htm   (1103 words)

  
 Galen of Pergamum (ca. 130-ca. 200) -- from Eric Weisstein's World of Scientific Biography
Galen also introduced the spirit system, consisting of natural spirit or "pneuma" (air he thought was found in the veins), vital spirit (blood mixed with air he believed to found in the arteries), and animal spirit (which he believed to be found in the nervous system).
Galen and his work On the Natural Faculties remained the authority on medicine until Vesalius in the sixteenth century, even though many of his views about human anatomy were false since he had performed his dissections on pigs, Barbary apes, and dogs.
Galen mistakenly maintained, for instance, that humans have a five-lobed liver (which dogs do) and that the heart had only two chambers (it has four).
scienceworld.wolfram.com /biography/Galen.html   (314 words)

  
 Galen Biography | eorl_05_package.xml
Galen was born in Pergamum (modern Bergama, Turkey), an important city in western Asia Minor, the only son of Nikon, an architect and geometer.
Galen's medical theory is deeply indebted to philosophy, the study of which he believed was essential to the education of a physician.
Galen was acquainted with both Jews and Christians and he refers several times in his philosophical and medical works to their beliefs.
www.bookrags.com /biography/galen-eorl-05   (1556 words)

  
 Galen Biography | Encyclopedia of World Biography
That Galen was a man of his time is shown by his success and rapid preferment, by his acceptance of dreams as sound directives for action and treatment, and by his acceptance of the Hippocratic tradition and of the social role of public prognostics.
Galen believed the Hippocratic writings were never wrong--merely obscure--and he saw his own work as the extension and clarification of the Hippocratic corpus; for example, he systematized the theory of the four humors.
Galen's concept of Nature is subtle and complex, and his Creator differs from the Christian God in not being omnipotent but subject to both the laws of necessity and the nature of matter.
www.bookrags.com /biography/galen   (1221 words)

  
 Galen [Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy]
Galen was one of the most prominent ancient physicians as well as a philosopher (though most of his philosophical writings are lost).
Galen of Pergamum was a physician who was born around 129 A.D. Pergamum was a bustling and vibrant city at the time and was particularly famous for its statue of Asclepius, a god of healing.
Galen's observation of a fluid in the horns of the uterus (Kühn IV, 594, 600-601) were the basis of his (mistaken) view that he had discovered female seed.
www.iep.utm.edu /g/galen.htm   (4029 words)

  
 Antiqua Medicina :: Galen
Galen, for all his mistakes, remained an unchallenged authority in his lifetime, and his work established a legacy that continued for over a thousand years.
Galen was convinced that the venous and arterial systems were each sealed and separate from each other.
Galen’s genius was evident in the physiological experiments he conducted on animals.
www.healthsystem.virginia.edu /internet/library/historical/artifacts/antiqua/galen.cfm   (740 words)

  
 Malaspina Great Books - Claudius Galen (c. 130 CE)
In 146 Galen began the study of medicine,; and in about his twentieth year he left Pergamus for Smyrna, in order to place himself under the instruction of the anatomist and physician Pelops, and of the peripatetic philosopher Albinus.
Galen was one of the most versatile and accomplished writers of his age.
Galen, who in his youth was carefully trained in the Stoic philosophy, was an unusually prolific writer on logic.
www.malaspina.org /home.asp?topic=./search/details&lastpage=./search/results&ID=338   (706 words)

  
 Red Gold . Innovators & Pioneers . Galen | PBS
Galen (130-200), Greek physician, anatomist, physiologist, philosopher, and lexicographer, was probably the most influential physician of all time.
Galen's father, Nicon, mathematician, architect, astronomer, philosopher, and devotee of Greek literature, was not only his sole instructor up to the age of 14, but the example of Stoic virtues on which Galen consciously modeled his own life.
In 157 Galen returned to Pergamon, where he "had the good fortune to think out and publicly demonstrate a cure for wounded tendons" which gained him, in 158, the position of physician to the gladiators.
www.pbs.org /wnet/redgold/innovators/bio_galen.html   (471 words)

  
 Galen the Physician
His mother, according to Galen himself, was a hot-tempered woman, always arguing with his father; Galen compared her to Socrates' wife Xanthippe.
His father as Galen says wanted him to study philosophy but Asclepius intervened in a dream giving him the advice that Galen should study medicine as he did.
The approximate 20000 pages of Galen's treatises have never had, as a whole, any critical edition; and it excludes numerous treatises which were not kept in Greek but in their translation.
www.mlahanas.de /Greeks/Galen.htm   (1755 words)

  
 Wayne County Galen History
The town of Galen was formed from Junius, Seneca County, February 14, 1812.
Galen is composed of nearly 35,300 acres of rich, sandy, gravely loam and fl muck.
Another interesting fact about the town of Galen is that it was the location of one of the four World War II Prisoner of War Camps in Wayne County.
www.co.wayne.ny.us /Departments/historian/HistGalen.htm   (528 words)

  
 Ancient Medicine/Medicina Antiqua::Galen:Biography
The physician and philosopher Galen was born at Pergamum in A.D. His father, Aelius Nicon, was an architect and builder with an interest in mathematics, logic, and astronomy and a fondness for exotic mathematical and literary recreations.
In 168, Galen tells us, Marcus and his co-emperor, Lucius Verus, invited him to return from Pergamum and to join them at their headquarters in Aquileia, where they were engaged in military operations against the Quadi and Marcomanni, barbarian tribes threatening the Danubian frontier.
Galen absorbed into his work nearly all preceding medical thought and shaped the categories within which his successors thought about not only the history of medicine, but its practice as well.
courses.ed.asu.edu /horan/ced522readings/galen/dreams/galenbio.htm   (883 words)

  
 BBC - GCSE Bitesize - History | Medicine through time | Galen   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Galen was an educated and experienced doctor who had worked at the
Galen also stressed the importance of understanding the skeleton and the functions of parts of the body.
Galen was not a Christian or a Muslim but he believed in one God and talked about 'the creator'.
www.bbc.co.uk /schools/gcsebitesize/history/medicine/medievalmedicineandgalenrev2.shtml   (775 words)

  
 My Science  -  Galen R Frysinger, Sheboygan, Wisconsin
Galen R. Frysinger and H. Thomas "A Method for the Determination of the Cation Exchange Capacity of Clay Minerals and Soils," Clays and Clay Materials, 1955.
Galen R. Frysinger and R. Horne "The Effect of Pressure on the Electrical Conductivity of Sea Water," J. Geophysical Research 68, 1967 (1963).
Galen R. Frysinger, R. Horne, W. Bannon and E. Sullivan "The Effect of Pressure on the Conductivity Of Battery Electrolytes," J.
www.galen-frysinger.com /sci.htm   (1044 words)

  
 Greek Medicine | Galen
Galen was born in Pergamos in Asia Minor in the year 131 C.E. After receiving medical training in Smyrna and Alexandria, he gained fame as a surgeon to the gladiators of Pergamos.
Galen spent the rest of his life at the Court writing an enormous corpus of medical works until his death in 201 C.E. Taking Hippocrates’; notions of the humors and pathology, Galen incorporated the anatomical knowledge of noted Alexandrians such as Herophilus of Chalcedon (335-280 B.C.E.).
Galen’s works in many ways came to symbolize Greek medicine to the medical scholars of Europe and the Middle East for the next fifteen centuries.
www.nlm.nih.gov /hmd/greek/greek_galen.html   (217 words)

  
 Galen
Galen was a famous physician of the second century.
He enjoyed the friendship of Marcus Aurelius, and was placed in charge of the health of the young Commodus while the emperor was away from Rome conducting the German war.
But Galen, as is most probable, had in addition the opportunity of meeting individual Christians at court.
www.earlychristianwritings.com /galen.html   (442 words)

  
 Strawson interview
Galen: Yes, many people think that determinism—the view that the history of the universe is fixed, the view that everything that happens is strictly necessitated by what has already gone before, in such a way that nothing can ever happen otherwise than it does—is the real threat to free will, to ultimate moral responsibility.
Galen: Yes, but I just want to stress the word “ultimate” before ‘moral responsibility.’ Because there’s a clear, weaker, everyday sense of “morally responsible” in which you and I and millions of other people are thoroughly morally responsible people.
Galen: I tried meditation when I was an undergraduate (and putative flower child with hair to my waist) at Cambridge in the UK in the late 1960s and early 1970s, but I’ve never managed to keep it up….
www.naturalism.org /strawson_interview.htm   (5835 words)

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