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Topic: Galero


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In the News (Wed 22 May 19)

  
  Ireland Information Guide , Irish, Counties, Facts, Statistics, Tourism, Culture, How
Galero, in the Roman Catholic Church, is a large, broad-brimmed tasseled hat worn by clergy.
Galero's were specially commissioned by the Vatican for future Archbishops of Chicago who join the College of Cardinals in honor of their significant office as head of one of the largest Roman Catholic dioceses in the world.
The galero is still in use today in ecclesiastical heraldry as part of the achievement of the coat of arms of an armigerous Roman Catholic cleric.
www.irelandinformationguide.com /Galero   (494 words)

  
  Galero - CSWiki   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-28)
Galero, in the Roman Catholic Church, is a large, broad-brimmed tasseled hat worn by clergy.
The galero is hung forever over the congregants of a cathedral, where they remain until they are reduced to dust, symbolizing how all earthly glory is passing.
The galero (or "ecclesiastical hat") is still in use today in ecclesiastical heraldry as part of the achievement of the coat of arms of an armigerous Roman Catholic cleric.
www.craft-searcher.net /wiki/index.php?title=Galero&redirect=no   (493 words)

  
  Galero - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
This galero was raised in 1924 for Michael Cardinal Logue, Roman Catholic Archbishop of Armagh in Ireland.
A Galero (pl. galeri) in the Roman Catholic Church is a large, broad-brimmed tasseled hat worn by clergy.
The galero (or "ecclesiastical hat") is still in use today in ecclesiastical heraldry as part of the achievement of the coat of arms of an armigerous Roman Catholic cleric.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Galero   (610 words)

  
 Galero - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Galero, in the Roman Catholic Church, is a large, broad-brimmed tasseled hat worn by clergy.
Galero's were specially commissioned by the Vatican for future Archbishops of Chicago who join the College of Cardinals in honor of their significant office as head of one of the largest Roman Catholic dioceses in the world.
The galero is still in use today in ecclesiastical heraldry as part of the achievement of the coat of arms of an armigerous Roman Catholic cleric.
www.encyclopedia-online.info /Galero   (475 words)

  
 MEMORIES OF GALERO
GALERO knew he was absolutely beautiful, and he would stand completely still when he was taken from his stall at the Spanish Military State Stud, though he would follow you with his big dark eyes as you walked around to admire him.
GALERO was very kind in temperament, and it was clear that he was always aware of his handler and his audience, and always did his best to please.
GALERO left behind important progeny, both sons and daughters, and a number of those were exported from Spain to various countries around the world.
www.ahlegacy.com /memories_of_galero.htm   (439 words)

  
 Ecclesiastical heraldry - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The galero was originally a pilgrim's-style hat like a sombrero, granted in red to cardinals by Pope Innocent IV at the First Council of Lyon in the thirteenth century, and was adopted by heraldry almost immediately.
The galero is ornamented with tassels (also termed houppes or fiocchi) indicating the cleric's place in the hierarchy; the number became significant beginning in the sixteenth century, and the meaning was fixed in 1832.
Both patriarchs and cardinals have a galero with fifteen tassels, but a patriarch's galero is green while a cardinal's is red or scarlet.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Ecclesiastical_heraldry   (4318 words)

  
 Reference.com/Encyclopedia/Galero
A galero (pl. galeri; L. galerum, pl. galera) in the Roman Catholic Church is a large, broad-brimmed tasseled hat worn by clergy.
Over the centuries the galero was eventually limited in use to individual cardinals as a crown symbolizing the title of Prince of the Church.
The galero (or "ecclesiastical hat") is still in use today in ecclesiastical heraldry as part of the achievement of the coat of arms of an armigerous Roman Catholic cleric.
www.reference.com /browse/wiki/Galero   (574 words)

  
 Archdiocese of Los Angeles
Traditionally, the galero was hung in the cardinal's cathedral upon his demise.
Galeros have not been actually worn since the 1870s when the practice was discontinued after the loss of the Papal States.
Upon a cardinal's demise, the hat was to be placed at the foot of the "catafalque," (coffin platform) after which it was to be suspended from the ceiling of the cathedral or church to which he was attached as evidence of the spiritual authority exercised by princes of the church.
www.archdiocese.la /archbishop/arms.html   (674 words)

  
 Christianity / roman catholic church / galero
A Galero (pl. galeri) in the Roman Catholic Church is a large, broad-brimmed tasseled hat worn by clergy.
Saint Patrick's Cathedral in New York City, Holy Name Cathedral in Chicago, Illinois, the Cathedral Basilica of Saint Louis in Saint Louis, Missouri, and the Cathedral of St. Matthew the Apostle in Washington, D.C. are four Cathedral churches in the United States that hang the galeri of past Cardinals on the ceilings.
The color of the galero and number of tassels (sometimes termed houppes or fiocchi) indicate the cleric's place in the hierarchy.
www.christianity-guide.com /christianity/galero.htm   (549 words)

  
 Galero brimmed tasseled hat worn by clergy
Over the centuries it was eventually limited in use to individual cardinals as a crown symbolizing the title of Prince of the Church.
However, some cardinals continue to obtain the galeros privately so that the old ceremony of its suspension over their tombs may be observed.
The galero is hung forever over the congregants of a cathedral, where they remain until they are reduced to dust, symbolizing how all earthly glory is passing.
www.apparelsearch.com /Definitions/Headwear_Hats/Galero_religious_hats.htm   (532 words)

  
 G.R. No. L-26882
Petre Galero was charged in Criminal Case No. 533 before the Court of First Instance of Camarines with estafa thru falsification of public documents in connection with the sale in favor of Carmen Verzo of the land in point.
Lapak, and Petre Galero about the previous inquiry of petitioner as early as November 5, 1951, to which he replied on November 12, 1951 that OCT No. 1097 was still intact.
Laig was the counsel of Petre Galero, Carmen Verzo must have known likewise that a torrens title to the same was existing and intact and the same was delivered by Petre to Atty.
www.lawphil.net /judjuris/juri1978/apr1978/gr_26882_1978.html   (3269 words)

  
 Galero at AllExperts
A Galero (pl. galeri) in the Roman Catholic Church is a large, broad-brimmed tasseled hat worn by clergy.
Over the centuries the galero was eventually limited in use to individual cardinals as a crown symbolizing the title of Prince of the Church.
The red galero was first granted to cardinals by Pope Innocent IV in 1245 at the First Council of Lyon.
en.allexperts.com /e/g/ga/galero.htm   (686 words)

  
 G.R. No. L-26882
The case was decided in favor of Petre Galero and became final on March 27, 1948 as alleged by the petitioners, which was not disputed by the respondents.
In the criminal case, the testimony of Petre Galero and his witnesses were not believed by the trial court and the Court of Appeals by reason of facts and circumstances revealed by their testimonies as well as their exhibits.
Petre Galero died in 1958 while serving sentence for estafa thru falsification of public document before the trial of this civil case began on August 4, 1960.
www.lawphil.net /judjuris/juri1978/nov1978/gr_26882_1978.html   (5108 words)

  
 Galero - Art History Online Reference and Guide
This galero was raised in 1924 for Michael Cardinal Logue, Archbishop of Armagh in Ireland.
Holy Name Cathedral in Chicago, Illinois, the Cathedral Basilica of Saint Louis in Saint Louis, Missouri, and the Cathedral of St. Matthew the Apostle in Washington, D.C. are three Cathedral churches in the United States that hang the galeros of past Cardinals on the ceilings.
The galero is still in use today in ecclesiastical heraldry as part of the achievement of the coat of arms of an armigerous Roman Catholic cleric.
www.arthistoryclub.com /art_history/Galero   (440 words)

  
 Archbishop Robert Kilwardby on Flickr - Photo Sharing!
The galero was originally a pilgrim's-style hat like a sombrero, granted in red to cardinals by Pope Innocent IV at the First Council of Lyon in the 13th century, and was adopted by heraldry almost immediately.
The galero in various colors and forms was used in heraldic achievements starting with its adoption in the arms of bishops in the 16th century.
The galero is ornamented with tassels (also termed fiocchi) indicating the cleric's place in the hierarchy; the number became significant beginning in the 16th century, and the meaning was fixed in 1832.
www.flickr.com /photos/paullew/496008906   (720 words)

  
 Black Horse Manor
Galero XIV arrived in Australia in July 2002 as a yearling.
Like Galero, Lastur was injured as a young stallion and hence was not shown however he has several young progeny that are making their mark on the dressage world.
Galero's dam Judia VIX is also a well-performed mare having consistently been placed in the top three at major shows in Spain.
www.blackhorsemanor.com.au /stallions.html   (669 words)

  
 Dappled Photos: Capelli e Galeri
The great-grandaddy of these hats is the Cardinals' galero, a very large, very flat red hat with great tassels hanging off it.
This is the famous "red hat" once presented to new Cardinals and which traditionally hang from their cathedrals (if they were diocesan bishops) over their tombs after their demise.
Even though the red galero is no longer given to new Cardinals by the Pope, some acquire one anyway, just to have something to hang from the cathedral ceiling.
dappledphotos.blogspot.com /2005/11/capelli-e-galeri.html   (166 words)

  
 Bishop's Coat of Arms
The arms of a patriarch consist of the green galero with two green fiocchi on the brim and 15 green fiocchi suspended on either side of the shield.
The arms of an archbishop consist of the green galero with two green fiocchi on the brim and 10 green fiocchi suspended on either side of the shield.
The arms of a cardinal in the Roman Catholic Church consist of the scarlet galero with two scarlet fiocchi on the brim, and 15 scarlet fiocchi suspended on either side of the shield.
ecc41.tripod.com /id11.html   (647 words)

  
 Suchmaschine
The galero was originally a pilgrim's-style hat like a sombrero, granted in red to cardinals by Pope Innocent IV at the First Council of Lyon in the 13th century, and was adopted by heraldry almost immediately.
The galero in various colors and forms was used in heraldic achievements starting with its adoption in the arms of bishops in the 16th century.
The galero is ornamented with tassels (also termed houppes or fiocchi) indicating the cleric's place in the hierarchy; the number became significant beginning in the 16th century, and the meaning was fixed in 1832.
www.dmoz.ch /lexikon.cgi?sprache=en&q=Ecclesiastical_heraldry   (4708 words)

  
 Episcopal Coat of Arms
These are arranged in four rows on either side of the shield and are of a green colour.
From the Galero and extending its full length behind the shield is the Processional Cross with its double Crosses.
Both the number of tassels and the double Crosses are the definitive symbols of the Prelate's status as an Archbishop.
www.geocities.com /tccbi/page9.html   (471 words)

  
 :: A V – Melogno – trail no. 10 ::
On the steep, south–west spur of Monte Galero, you’ll see some sharp projections of rock jutting out in curious shapes.
These are known by the name of “Giganti di Pietra”, meaning Stone Giants, shaped by erosion which has selectively eaten away the “Brecce di Monte Galero”, removing only the least solid parts.
Thanks to its position lying between the Alps and the Mediterranean (like Monte Toraggio and Pietravecchia), it prides an assortment of “glacier relics”, in other words a variety of typical Alpine or Nordic plants which first reached Liguria during the last glaciation in the area.
www.altaviadeimontiliguri.it /eng/tappe/tappa10.html   (339 words)

  
 Pope's coat of arms - Catholic Answers Forums
galero (hat) and thirty fiocchi (tassels) with fifteen on either side.
galero (hat) and twenty fiocchi (tassels) with ten on either side.
Abbot (and provosts) – fl galero (hat) and twelve fiocchi (tassels) with six on either side and a veiled crosier instead of an Episcopal cross.
forums.catholic.com /showthread.php?p=628041   (3409 words)

  
 Angiclian Galero Usage - American Heraldry Society Forums   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-28)
Is A Canon in the Anglican Church entitled to a Galero?
So the galero for a Canon has cords that are all fl and the tassels are red.
In addition, it is worth noting that these hats are granted by the English College of Arms (and used by those who follow their customal).
forums.heraldrysociety.us /showthread.php?t=104   (576 words)

  
 Archdiocese of San Francisco | The Archbishop
Above the cross is a type of hat called a galero with two tassels or fiocchi on the brim and ten suspended on each side from cords.
The galero is no longer worn, but is still utilized in the arms of cardinals, patriarchs, archbishops and bishops.
A red galero is the traditional symbol of a cardinal, hence the saying "receiving the red hat." The appropriate color for the galero of a patriarch, archbishop or bishop is green.
www.sfarchdiocese.org /catholic.html   (864 words)

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