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Topic: Garamantes


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In the News (Tue 23 Apr 19)

  
  Garamantes at AllExperts
According to Strabo and Pliny, the Garamantes quarried amazonite in the Tibesti Mountains.
The Garamantes constructed a network of underground tunnels and shafts to mine the fossil water from under the limestone layer under the desert sand.
The Garamantes were probably present as tribal people in the Fezzan by 1000 BC They appear in the written record for the first time in the 5th century BC; according to Herodotus, they were a numerous people who herded cattle and hunted the "Ethiopian Troglodytes", or "cave-dwellers" who lived in the desert, from four-horse chariots.
en.allexperts.com /e/g/ga/garamantes.htm   (821 words)

  
  Garamantes - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
According to Strabo and Pliny, the Garamantes quarried amazonite in the Tibesti Mountains.
The Garamantes constructed a network of underground tunnels and shafts to mine the fossil water from under the limestone layer under the desert sand.
The Garamantes were probably present as tribal people in the Fezzan by 1000 BC They appear in the written record for the first time in the 5th century BC; according to Herodotus, they were a numerous people who herded cattle and hunted the "Ethiopian Troglodytes", or "cave-dwellers" who lived in the desert, from four-horse chariots.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Garamantes   (781 words)

  
 Fezzan - LoveToKnow 1911   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-09-17)
FEZZAN (the ancient Phazania, or country of the Garamantes), a region of the Sahara, forming a "kaimakamlik" of the Ottoman vilayet of Tripoli.
Garama (Jerma-el-Kedima), the capital under the Garamantes and the Romans,was in the Wadi-el-Gharbi.
The Garamantes, whether of Libyan or Negro origin, had certainly a considerable degree of civilization when in the year 19 B.C. they were conquered by the proconsul L. Cornelius Balbus Minor and their country added to the Roman empire.
www.1911encyclopedia.org /Fezzan   (1783 words)

  
 [No title]
FEZZAN (the ancient Phazania, or country of the Garamantes), a- region of the Sahara, forming a " kaimakamlik " of the Ottoman vilayet of Tripoli (q.v.).
Garama-(Derma-el-Kedima), the capital under the Garamantes and the Romans, was in the Wadi-el-Gharbi.
Attempts have been made to identify the Garamantes with the Berauna of the Arabs of the 7th century, and to the period of the Garamantes Duveyrier assigns the remains of remarkable hydraulic works, and certain tombs and rock sculptures—indications, it is held, of a Negro civilization of ancient date which existed in the northern Sahara.
encyclopedia.jrank.org /correction/edit?content_id=25053&locale=en   (1869 words)

  
 Tibbu - LoveToKnow 1911   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-09-17)
The Tibbu are usually identified with the Garamantes of Herodotus (iv.
But Leo Africanus transfers them to the Berber connexion, whose fifth great division he deals with under the names of Gumeri (Garamantes?) and Bardaei or Bardoa, that is, the Teda of the Bardai oasis, Tibesti.
They are a pure homogeneous race, who have for ages undergone no perceptible change in their rocky homes, and are still distinguished by the regular features, long fl ringlety hair, haughty bearing and fierce expression common to so many of the Berber peoples.
www.1911encyclopedia.org /Tibbu   (949 words)

  
 Historical Context of Burrows Cave by Dr. Joseph Mahan
This fact is important to our story because the valley of the River Baetes and the port of Gades would have been in friendly hands at the time Helios drew his map of that river and would have provided the logical route for him and his brother to take in their flight from Rome.
The Garamantes were Berber people from whom Juba was descended and were closely affiliated with the Mauri who gave their name to the Kingdom of Mauretania.
There is a reason to think that many of the Garamantes were ferried to a secret colony in America that their ancestors and the Carthaginians established some two centuries earlier as a ready haven in the case they should ever need such against the Romans.
www.waac.info /amazigh/reports/Mahan_historical_context_of_burrows_cave.html   (2666 words)

  
 Top Literature - Sahara Desert
An urban civilization, the Garamantes, arose around this time in the heart of the Sahara, in a valley that is now called the Wadi al-Ajal in Fazzan, in Libya.
The Garamantes achieved this development by digging tunnels far into the mountains flanking the valley to tap fossil water and bring it to their fields.
The Garamantes grew populous and strong, conquering their neighbors and capturing many slaves (which were put to work extending the tunnels).
encyclopedia.topliterature.com /?title=Sahara_Desert   (1302 words)

  
 Garamantes: Encyclopedia topic   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-09-17)
There is not much information about the Garamantes, not even the name they used to call themselves; Garamantes was a Greek (Greek: A native or inhabitant of Greece) name later adopted by the Romans (Romans: A New Testament book containing an exposition of the doctrines of Saint Paul; written in AD 58).
Current research indicates that the Garamantes had about eight major towns, three of which have been examined as of 2004 (as of 2004: 2004 is a leap year starting on thursday of the gregorian calendar....
The Garamantes constructed a network of underground tunnels and shafts to mine the fossil (fossil: The remains (or an impression) of a plant or animal that existed in a past geological age and that has been excavated from the soil) water from under the limestone layer under the desert sand.
www.absoluteastronomy.com /reference/garamantes   (755 words)

  
 Garamantes - TheBestLinks.com - Amazonite, Byzantium, Christianity, Fossil, ...   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-09-17)
Garamantes were people who lived in Sahara using a elaborate underground irrigation system and founded a kingdom in the Fezzan area of modern-day Libya.
Garamantes were probably present as tribal people in the Fezzan by at 1000 BCE.
After a Roman punitive expedition in 70 AD, the Garamantes were forced to an official relationship with Rome and might have become one of the Roman client states.
www.thebestlinks.com /Garamantes.html   (583 words)

  
 Germa - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The Garamantes were a warrior nation who originated in the Tibesti region of the Sahara.
The Garamantian Empire was a two-thousand-year-old civilization that once ruled the Fezzan.
The Garamantes were a Berber kingdom who had resisted the Roman Empire's dominating influence.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Germa   (171 words)

  
 Berbers   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-09-17)
Garamantes: The largest African desert tribe, operating from the desert city of Garama in the south.
They are a small tribe who have fended off attacks by the Garamantes to the south as well as the Romans in Africa and the Cyrenaicans, who are both not really interested in this barren region.
Their army is similar to the Garamantes and the Augilae and adopt much the same battle tactics, the major difference being that their numbers are much smaller.
www.donaldhs.vic.edu.au /home/spotter/Berbers.html   (693 words)

  
 Good info about Garamantes arabs Online   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-09-17)
Persia weakened from wars with each other, the Arabs seized Syria and Palestine from the Empire and invaded found in the history of the Garamantes, a tribe, according to E of the realm of the Garamantes, a people who have not been precisely identified.
The pre-Islamic arabs, such as the Garamantes, were influenced by ancient Egyptian and Babylonian mythology.
During the The Garamantes or Ancient Mande of the Fezzan.
www.1arab37.info /arab-women/garamantes--arabs.html   (706 words)

  
 BBC News | MIDDLE EAST | Lost kingdom of the Sahara
According to Roman authors, the Garamantes were fierce and ungovernable nomads - but research by scholars from Leicester and Newcastle universities shows they lived in fashionable towns and performed miracles farming in the blistering desert.
The result will be a three-volume publication crediting the Garamantes with introducing writing, the horse, the camel and wheeled transport to this region of the Sahara.
Where the Garamantes came from is a mystery, and the researchers are struggling to understand what became of them in the Middle Ages.
news.bbc.co.uk /1/low/world/middle_east/845160.stm   (483 words)

  
 Welcom_To_Aldiar_travel   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-09-17)
It was founded by the Garamantes, who belonged to a large Libyan tribe, experienced in desert traveling.
The Garamantes, with the help of their neighboring tribes, resisted the Roman influence.
The Garamantes were renowned as warriors, who drove chariots drawn by four horses, and masters of the desert routes.
www.aldiartravel.com /sahara.html   (979 words)

  
 FS Ancient Mysteries: Desert Hides Ancient Civilization
Nearly all scholars had thought this ancient people, known as the Garamantes, had been little more than desert barbarians living in one small town, a couple of villages and scattered, nomadic encampments.
A 3,000-mile network of underground irrigation canals was built by the Garamantes, which tapped into natural fossil water supplies laid down more than 40,000 years ago when rain last fell plentifully in the area.
With the subterranean canals, food production rose and the population expanded, so by 500BC the Garamantes were able to create their first towns and to start expanding their area of political control.
www.100megsfree4.com /farshores/asahara.htm   (536 words)

  
 Acacus - Italian-Libyan Archaeological Mission in the Acacus and Messak
The Garamantes are the people who inhabited the Fezzan during the period from ca.
Initially a sort of large tribal federation, the Garamantes had a true kingdom in the period between the last three centuries BC and the mid-fourth century AD.
The “royal” tombs excavated in the Germa area (the ancient Garama, capital of the Garamantes) by the Italian Biagi-Caputo mission in 1932-35 discovered a significant quantity of luxury goods imported from the Mediterranean.
www.acacus.it /eng/ricter_arch_sto1.htm   (559 words)

  
 the garamantes the blackcivlization in the sahara   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-09-17)
A 3,000-mile network of underground irrigation canals was built by the Garamantes, which tapped into natural fossil water supplies laid down more than 40,000 years ago when rain last fell plentifully in the area.
With the subterranean canals, food production rose and the population expanded, so by 500BC the Garamantes were able to create their first towns and to start expanding their area of political control.
This water crisis, as well as a reduction in trade caused by the lesser volume of slavery in the Mediterranean and the decline of the Roman Empire, seems to have reduced the power of the Garamantian civilisation by the sixth century AD.
www.raceandhistory.com /cgi-bin/forum/webbbs_config.pl/noframes/read/751   (1296 words)

  
 Phoenicians in West Europe: From Canaan to Cornwall & Cork
Garamantes seems to be a word from an African language of the Mande/Manding group(s).
Lacroix (Africa in Antiquity 1998) and Smith (ib.) respectively saying that Garamantes means Wearers of the Veil and that Muleththamin is an Arabic term for the Tuaregs and means People of the Veil.
These are reinforced by tales of (a) Nasamones having crossed the desert said to have been captured by (?) Pygmies; Garamantes having to deal with troubles to the south of the Sahara; Romans (with and without Garamantes) crossing the desert.
phoenicia.org /canaancornwall.html   (10566 words)

  
 Herodotus in Africa
The Garamantes lived further inland behind the Nasamones in the land of wild beasts.
The Garamantes "avoided all `men'" and lived without any means of defense (i.e.: nothing that Herodotus recognized as a "modern" army).
The Garamantes used four-horse chariots to hunt Ethiopian "hole-men" or troglodytes, who were very fast, ate snakes and lizards, and spoke a unique language that included bat-like squeaks.
courses.wcupa.edu /jones/his311/notes/herod.htm   (1283 words)

  
 THE DESERT IS NOT SILENT.COM » Articles » Arts & Humanities » History » The Antiquities of Libya   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-09-17)
Within the country the Garamantes who were still independent established the foundation for an original cultural existence during the first century AD.
In ancient times, Garama was the main centre of the Garamantes, a people of southern Libya who cultivated the valleys and controlled trans-Saharan trade between the coastal area ruled by the Romans, and central Africa, from where came gold, ivory and slaves.
The Garamantes were never under the domination of the Roman Empire, despite the expedition of Lucius Cornelius Balbus in or shortly before 19 BC that reached Rhapsa, identified with the modern Ghat.
www.thedesertisnotsilent.com /Articles/detail.asp?iData=4&iCat=272&iChannel=2&nChannel=Articles   (1967 words)

  
 Kingdom of the Sands
The research, however, now suggests that the Garamantes had about eight major towns (three of which have now been examined) and scores of other important settlements, and that they controlled a substantial state.
The success of the Garamantes was based on their subterranean water-extraction system, a network of tunnels known as foggaras in Berber.
Thanks to their aggressive mentality and the slaves and water it produced, the Garamantes lived in planned towns and feasted on locally grown grapes, figs, sorghum, pulses, barley, and wheat, as well as on imported luxuries such as wine and olive oil.
www.archaeology.org /0403/abstracts/sands.html   (783 words)

  
 Garamantes: Facts and details from Encyclopedia Topic   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-09-17)
The Garamantes constructed a network of underground tunnels and shafts to mine the fossil (The remains (or an impression) of a plant or animal that existed in a past geological age and that has been excavated from the soil)
The Garamantes were probably present as tribal people in the Fezzan by 1000 BCE, Exception Handler: No article summary found.
the Garamantes were forced into an official relationship with Rome and might have become one of the Roman client state (Client state refers to the notion of one state being subservient to another....)
www.absoluteastronomy.com /ref/garamantes   (1505 words)

  
 Current World Archaeology
CWA 9 ranges around the world from some of the earliest men to be discovered outside Africa, through Bronze Age burials in Thailand and a huge statue in Egypt, to the mysterious Garamantes deep in the Sahara.
The secret appeared to be a hidden source of water: deep under the desert, huge quantities of water had been trapped ever since the Ice Age, when the Sahara bloomed and received a regular rainfall.
The Romans saw the Garamantes as being raiders, but the Roman influence was clearly powerful.
www.archaeology.co.uk /cwa/issues/cwa9/cwa9.htm   (864 words)

  
 Saudi Aramco World : Libya’s Forgotten Desert Kingdom   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-09-17)
Herodotus was the first to call his people by their proper name, the Garamantes, and to correctly locate his homeland in the Fezzan Oasis, in Libya’s southwestern corner.
The Garamantes’ portrait shares the rock face with other carved images—an ostrich hunt, a giraffe and a horseman—that call to mind the tremendous wealth of rock art, dating from the late Paleolithic through to the early modern era, found throughout the Sahara.
The last Garamantes foray to the coast was in AD 69, when they joined with the people of Oea (modern Tripoli) in battle against Leptis Magna.
www.saudiaramcoworld.com /issue/200403/libya.s.forgotten.desert.kingdom.htm   (3163 words)

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