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Topic: Gdynia


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  Seattle-Gdynia Sister City Association
By 1939, Gdynia was a thriving city with a population of more than 100,000.
Gdynia leaders have embraced the challenges of developing a market economy.
The members of the Seattle-Gdynia Sister City Association are dedicated to sharing the history, culture, and economy of the Seattle-area with Gdynia citizens.
www.seattlegdynia.org   (317 words)

  
  Welcome Poland - Informations about Gdynia in Poland.   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-30)
Gdynia is situated at the crossroads of international rail, road and sea transportation routes linking Poland with all major cities of the continent.
Today, the residents of Gdynia are the third or even fourth generation of the founders and constructors of the city - the successors of people that linked their future with Gdynia determined to succeed there.
Gdynia is an attractive place for connoisseurs of every realm of art, enthusiasts of intensive experiences of nature and active sport lovers.
www.welcomepoland.com /gdynia   (1287 words)

  
 Gdynia - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Gdynia is part of a conurbation with the spa town of Sopot, the city of Gdańsk (Danzig) and suburban communities, which together form a metropolitan area called the Tricity (Trójmiasto) with a population of over a million people.
The area of the later city of Gdynia shared its history with Eastern Pomerania; in prehistoric times it was the center of Oksywian culture; it was later populated by Goths and eventually Slavs with some Baltic Prussian influence.
Gdynia after World War II On March 28, 1945 Gdynia was captured by the Soviets and assigned to Polish Gdansk Voivodship.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Gdynia   (1592 words)

  
 GDYNIA   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-30)
Gdynia is a city in the Pomeranian Voivodship of Poland and an important seaport at Gdansk Bay on the south coast of the Baltic Sea.
Gdynia is part of a conurbation with the spa town of Sopot, the city of Gdańsk and suburban communities, which together form a metropolitan area called the Tricity with a population of over a million people.
The decision to build a major seaport at the Gdynia village was made by the Polish government in winter 1920, because of the hostile attitude of the Danzig authorities and the seaport workers towards Allied military supplies to Poland during the Polish-Soviet War.
www.yotor.org /wiki/en/gd/Gdynia.htm   (1222 words)

  
 Gdynia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-30)
Gdynia is part of a conurbation with the spa town of Sopot the city of Gdańsk and suburban communities which together form a metropolitan area called the Tricity (Trójmiasto) with a population of over a people.
In 1938 Gdynia was most modern and the biggest seaport on Baltic sea and the 10th biggest in The trasnshipments rose to 8.7 mln tons was 46% of Polish foreign trade.
Gdynia city and seaport were occupied in 1939 and renamed Gotenhafen to commemorate the Goths (despite that the previous German name Gdingen with no relation to the Goths).
www.freeglossary.com /Gdynia   (1387 words)

  
 GDYNIA
Gdynia can be a great destination for anyone who wants to relax without giving up the advantages of a vibrating urban area with many entertainment opportunities, superb clubs and restaurants.
Gdynia is one of the youngest Polish cities, which is reflected in its appearance and atmosphere.
Gdynia is situated along Gdansk Bay, the part of the Baltic sea sheltered by the Hel peninsula.
www.staypoland.com /gdynia-es.htm   (505 words)

  
 Encyclopedia: Gdynia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-30)
In 1938 Gdynia was the most modern and the biggest seaport on the Baltic sea, and the 10th biggest in Europe.
Gdynia city and seaport were occupied in September 1939 and renamed Gotenhafen to commemorate the Goths (despite that the previous German name was Gdingen, with no relation to the Goths).
Gdynia after World War II In 28 of March 1945 Gdynia was captured by the Soviets and assigned to Poland (Gdansk Voivodship).
www.nationmaster.com /encyclopedia/Gdynia   (1234 words)

  
 Encyclopedia article: Gdynia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-30)
Gdynia, as part of Eastern Pomerania, was part of the loose confederation of Slavic tribes (additional info and facts about Slavic tribes) that would later be called Poland from circa 990 (additional info and facts about 990) –1308.
Gdynia after World War II In March 1945 Gdynia was captured by the Soviets and assigned to Poland (Gdansk Voivodship (additional info and facts about Gdansk Voivodship)).
Gdynia is also famous for its numerous examples of early 20th century (additional info and facts about 20th century) architecture, especially monumentalism and early functionalism (A psychology based on the assumption that all mental process are useful to an organism in adapting to the environment).
www.absoluteastronomy.com /encyclopedia/g/gd/gdynia.htm   (1903 words)

  
 Gdynia Sister City Report
Gdynia, a relatively new town in old Europe, is located on the Gulf of Gdansk on the Baltic Sea.
Gdynia's present-day economy, as it has been from the beginning, is centered around the sea.
Gdynia was in better shape than most of Poland to adapt to the changing economic environment.
www.cityofseattle.net /tda/trade_info/TBfrontsistergdynia.htm   (1857 words)

  
 Gdynia - Gurupedia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-30)
The decision to build a major seaport at the Gdynia village was made by the Polish government in winter 1920, because of the hostile attitude of the Danzig (Gdansk) authorities and the seaport workers towards Allied military supplies to Poland during the Polish-Soviet War (1919–1920).
Gdynia became a primary German naval base, why Gdynia witnessed several airraids by the Allies from 1943 and onwards, but little destruction was actually made then.
Gdynia's seaport was vandalised by the withdrawing German troops in 1945 (90% of the buildings and equipment were destroyed) and the harbour entrance was blocked by the Gneisenau
www.gurupedia.com /g/gd/gdynia.htm   (1217 words)

  
 GDANSK  - turist information om Gdansk , Gdynia og Sopot
Tilmeld dig vores nyhedsbrev der udsendes 4 - 6 gange årligt og indeholder nyheder samt information om kulturelle aktiviteter i Polen og Stettin samt gode rejsetilbud i forbindelse hermed
Gdansk har i dag ca 470.000 indbyggere men området består egentlig af 3 byer der er vokset sammen til en stor by - området kaldes på Polsk trojmiasto der betyder de 3 byer, Gdansk, Sopot og Gdynia, hvoraf Gdansk er den største af byerne.
Besøg f.eks byerne Sopot og Gdynia, halvøen Westerplatte, Stutthof koncentrationslejren, eller den smukke natur i Kartuzy området der beboes af et specielt folk, kazubierne.
www.gdynia.dk   (436 words)

  
 Gdynia travel guide - Wikitravel
Gdynia is a port city in northern Poland.
Gdynia was first mentioned in the 13th century as a fishing village.
Gdynia is also famous for its numerous examples of early 20th century architecture, especially monumentalism and early functionalism.
wikitravel.org /en/Gdynia   (601 words)

  
 Gdynia bei eLexi - das Onlinelexikon   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-30)
rightMap of the Tricity area Gdynia (former German names Gdingen until 1939 and Gotenhafen 1939-1945; Kashubian Gdiniô) is a city in the Pomeranian Voivodship and an important seaport at Gdansk Bay on the south coast of the Baltic Sea.
Gdynia was the location for the Nazi concentration camp Gotenhafen, that was a subcamp of the concentration camp Stutthof.
Gdynia's seaport was vandalised by the withdrawing German troops in 1945 (90% of the buildings and equipment were destroyed) and the harbour entrance was blocked by the Gneisenau battleship.
www.elexi.de /en/g/gd/gdynia.html   (1389 words)

  
 Gdynia - AOL Research & Learn
Originally a small German fishing village, it was transferred to Poland after World War I. Gdynia as a port was built up after 1924 to end Poland's dependence on Danzig (Gdańsk).
By 1934, Gdynia handled more freight than Danzig and was a leading Baltic port.
By 1950 most of the harbor was rebuilt, and Gdynia was again an important commercial port.
reference.aol.com /columbia/_a/gdynia/20051206025109990004   (173 words)

  
 GDYNIA MARITIME ACADEMY
Gdynia Maritime Academy is now a very modern higher education institution which aims at meeting the needs of future decades.
Gdynia Maritime Academy is the shipowner of three training vessels: "Dar Młodzieży", "Horyzont" and "Zenit", which play a significant role in the practical preparation of students for work at sea.
Gdynia Maritime Academy recognises the highest criteria for the education of specialised marine staff in compliance with the international convention STCW (Standard of Training Certification and Watchkeeping for Seafarers).
www.pg.gda.pl /PismoPG/nr6_98/P27.HTM   (861 words)

  
 Gdynia | Gdansk Life
Gdynia was ear-marked for development, and progress was rapid.
Although the ports themselves were destroyed (they were carefully rebuilt afterwards), Gdynia survived the war, and like Gdansk, many new settlers came here from the lost eastern cities of Vilnius and Lwow.
Gdynia today is poised at an interesting stage in its development, riding on the crest of Poland's economic reforms.
www.gdansk-life.com /poland/gdynia   (568 words)

  
 Gdynia - Tourism
Gdynia's birthday falls on the 10th of February in the coldest season.
It abounds in concerts, competitions, contests and sport events, some of which are staged by the youth from Gdynia's sister cities as a way of promoting their native towns.
Gdynia has come to be the ballooning capital of Poland thereby captivating the hearts of the enthusiasts of this sport.
www.gdynia.pl /eng/tourism/4585_.html   (594 words)

  
 Gdynia, Poland, Pictures
Gdynia, city, seaport, and naval base in northern Poland, in Gdansk Province.
By 1934 Gdynia had become one of the most important ports in eastern Europe, with harbor facilities capable of handling the largest oceangoing vessels.
Shortly after the German invasion of Poland in September 1939, Gdynia, then with a population of about 120,000, was occupied by the Germans and renamed Gotenhafen.
www.greatestcities.com /Europe/Poland/Gdynia_city.html   (235 words)

  
 GDYNIA, Poland - Seattle Sister City
Gdynia is one of Poland's youngest, most dynamic cities with a population of nearly 260,000.
In 1253 Gdynia was a fishing settlement and now is the center of deep-sea fishing and shipbuilding.
Gdynia forms a tri-city with Gdansk (magnificent medieval port rebuilt after World War II and birthplace of Solidarity) and Sopot (elegant resort with International Song Festival in romantic Forest Opera).
www.cityofseattle.net /oir/Gdynia.htm   (218 words)

  
 Plymouth City Council - Gdynia, Poland
With a population of around 250,000 Gdynia is a progressive and cosmopolitan city forming with neighbouring Sopot and Gdansk what has become known as the 'Troj-Miasta' or 'Tri-City'.
The links between the cities are very active and the collapse of Communism, abolition of visa requirements and availability of frequent and relatively inexpensive transport resulted in significant numbers of visitors to and from the respective cities.
Such a dialogue has already been established between the Plymouth and Gdynia Chambers and there is real optimism that this can be built upon in the years to come to the mutual benefit of the two local economies.
www.plymouth.gov.uk /print/gdyniapoland   (398 words)

  
 FAV Gdynia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-30)
Gdynia with its 255,000 inhabitants is located in the northern part of Poland near Gdansk.
Gdynia, a city of maritime traditions and origins, has its development strategies closely linked with the maritime economy.
Gdynia is doing its best to assure the sustainable development of the city by both modern methods of organising public transport as well as by the thorough modernisation of the city's road network.
www.tellus-cities.net /index_28_en.html   (278 words)

  
 YourArt.com >> Encyclopedia >> Gdynia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-30)
The first mention of name Gdynia was of a Pomeranian (Kashubian) fishing village, in 1253.
One of Gdynia's important streets is named after Janek Wiśniewski.
Most of Gdynia can be seen from Kamienna Góra (54 metres asl) or a newly built observation point near Chwaszczyno.
www.yourart.com /research/encyclopedia.cgi?subject=/Gdynia   (1607 words)

  
 Open Directory - Regional: Europe: Poland: Voivodships: Pomerania-Kashubia: Gdynia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-30)
Gdynia Cotton Association - Non-profit, international organization for producers, traders, manufacturers, institutions and organizations in the cotton industry, focused on research, development, testing and arbitration.
Gdynia Hotel - Situated in the city centre, near seafront boulevard and off shore pier, "Pod Dêbem" restaurant, "Nautica" night club, snack bar, aperitif bar, indoor swimming pool, sauna, solarium UVA.
Gdynia In Your Pocket - A guide to the city's hotels, restaurants, transportation, and tourist attractions, with street level maps.
dmoz.org /Regional/Europe/Poland/Voivodships/Pomerania-Kashubia/Gdynia   (355 words)

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