Factbites
 Where results make sense
About us   |   Why use us?   |   Reviews   |   PR   |   Contact us  

Topic: General Motors streetcar conspiracy


Related Topics

In the News (Wed 24 Apr 19)

  
  The Streetcar Conspiracy - How General Motors Deliberately Destroyed Public Transit   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-03)
The electric streetcar, contrary to Van Wilkins incredible naïve whitewash (this article is a response to an earlier article by Van Wilkin, which argued that commuter rail lines died a natural death), did not die a natural death: General Motors killed it.
General Motors sought to reduce competition from electric railways through a variety of measures, including the use of freight leverage.
The streetcar did not die, as Wilkins contended, because of demographics or economics or disinvestments or evolution; it died because GM in 1922 made a conscious decision to kill it and, for the next several decades, pursued a strategy designed to accomplish this objective.
www.saveourwetlands.org /streetcar.htm   (1568 words)

  
  General Motors streetcar conspiracy Information
The General Motors streetcar conspiracy refers to a contention that General Motors (GM), acting in conjunction with several other companies and through the National City Lines (NCL) holding company, illegally acquired many streetcar systems in various cities around the United States, dismantled and replaced them with buses for the express purpose of promoting the automobile.
Additionally, some conspiracy theory advocates go further by asserting that riding a bus is so unpleasant compared to a train that the consortium's ulterior motive was to get people away from mass transit altogether and into automobiles of their own.
Streetcar routes were being converted to buses in major cities around the world, including cities like London, without GM's involvement, because buses were seen as the new technology at the time.
www.bookrags.com /General_Motors_streetcar_conspiracy   (1051 words)

  
 General Motors   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-03)
General Motors is a United States-based automobile maker with worldwide operations and brands including Buick, Cadillac, Chevrolet, Daewoo, GMC, Holden, Hummer, Oldsmobile, Opel, Pontiac, Saturn, Saab, and Vauxhall.
General Motors was founded in 1908 as a holding company for Buick,by then controlled by William C. Durant, and acquired Oldsmobile later that year.
The chairman of General Motors at the time, Alfred P. Sloan, allegedly defended this support of the German government, because GM's operations in Germany at that time were "highly profitable".
www.icyclopedia.com /encyclopedia/g/ge/general_motors.html   (534 words)

  
 General Motors Corporation - Encyclopedia, History, Geography and Biography   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-03)
During the 1920s and 1930s, General Motors bought out the bus company Yellow Coach, helped create Greyhound bus lines, replaced intercity train transport with buses, and established subsidiary companies to buy out streetcar companies and replace the rail-based services with buses.
General Motors merged Hughes Aircraft with its Delco Electronics unit to form GM Hughes Electronics (GMHE).
General Motors inability to deliver significant contributions to its fleet of hybrid vehicles is resulting in a opportunity loss to make sizable decreases in both air pollutant and sound level emissions.
www.arikah.net /encyclopedia/General_Motors   (3668 words)

  
 General Motors streetcar conspiracy - Definition, explanation
The General Motors streetcar conspiracy refers to a contention that General Motors (GM), acting in conjunction with several other companies and through the National City Lines (NCL) holding company, illegally acquired many streetcar systems in various cities around the United States and replaced them with buses for the express purpose of promoting the automobile.
General Motors alone was convicted on this charge.
Streetcar systems failed for other reasons than National City Lines: System deterioration during World War II; politically or socially motivated opponents of streetcar systems, such as Robert Moses and Fiorello LaGuardia; federal subsidy of competing systems; competition with automobiles for road space; and suburbanization all played roles.
www.calsky.com /lexikon/en/txt/g/ge/general_motors_streetcar_conspiracy.php   (974 words)

  
 General Motors information - Search.com
General Motors is also a majority shareholder (50.9%) in GM Daewoo.
General Motors (GM) was founded in 1908 in Flint, Michigan as a holding company for Buick, then controlled by William C. Durant, and acquired Oldsmobile later that year.
General Motors is the top-selling foreign auto maker in China, with 11.2% of the total market there.
www.search.com /reference/General_Motors_Corporation   (3464 words)

  
 General Motors stops the trollies
That was General Motors’ post-Depression strategy for stimulating bus sales, an effort that led to the destruction of the U.S. streetcar system and, ultimately, a criminal conviction.
When General Motors’ bus and auto sales began to level off during the 1930s, the company targeted the urban transportation market, which in nearly every U.S. city was dominated by streetcars (trollies).
The streetcar was not easily replaced; its tracks occupied both sides of the roadway, and it offered no additional room for buses to operate.
www.stayfreemagazine.org /archives/19/generalmotors.html   (300 words)

  
 General Motors
General Motors, also known as GM, is a United States-based automobile maker with worldwide operations and brands including Buick, Cadillac, Chevrolet, Daewoo, GMC, Holden, Hummer, Oldsmobile, Opel, Pontiac, Saturn, Saab, and Vauxhall.
In December 2003, it acquired Delta in South Africa, in which it had taken a 45 per cent stake in 1997, and which is now a fully-owned subsidiary, General Motors South Africa.
A strike began at the General Motors parts factory in Flint, Michigan on June 5, 1998 that quickly spread to five other assembly plants and lasted seven weeks.
www.knowledgefun.com /book/g/ge/general_motors.html   (658 words)

  
 General Motors Streetcar Conspiracy - InfoSearchPoint.com   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-03)
The General Motors Streetcar Conspiracy is a popular urban legend that General Motors illegally acquired many US streetcar systems and replaced them with buses for the express purpose of promoting the automobile.
This belief has been questioned by Sy Adler who points out that, among other things, that General Motors was not convicted of buying up urban trolley systems but rather merely of forcing bus companies owned by General Motors to use General Motors buses and that trolley ridership peaked in the 1920 before GM's actions.
Evidence in favor of the conspiracy are claims that, for instance, between 1926 and 1936 General Motors (GM) acquired New York Railways.
www.infosearchpoint.com /display/General_Motors_Streetcar_Conspiracy   (567 words)

  
 GENERAL MOTORS
General Motors is the world's largest vehicle manufacturer and employs over 340,000 people.
On April 4, 2005 General Motors Corp. sold is Electro-Motive Division to Greenbriar Equity Group LLC and Berkshire Partners.
General Motors has established extensive hydrogen fuel cell research and development facilities both in the U.S. and Europe.
www.speedace.info /automotive_directory/general_motors.htm   (2269 words)

  
 Conspiracy theories - Wikispiracy
A conspiracy theory explains the ultimate cause of an event (usually a political, social, or historical event) as a secret, and often deceptive, plot by a covert alliance of powerful people or organisations rather than as an overt activity or as natural occurrence.
This is unfortunate because conspiracy theorists are most often not the wild extremist types that the media would have you believe and even more often their ideas are both extremely well researched and well presented.
Many conspiracy theories are most likely true, and have enough verifiable evidence to be taken seriously, raising the intriguing question of what mechanisms might exist in popular culture that lead to their suppression and subsequent official rejection.
www.wikispiracy.org /index.php?title=Conspiracy_theories&printable=yes   (910 words)

  
 General Motors - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
General Motors Corporation, also known as GM or GMC is the world's second largest auto company by sales revenue as of the first sales quarter of 2007 (behind Toyota).
General Motors was founded on September 16, 1908 in Flint, Michigan, as a holding company for Buick, then controlled by William C. Durant, and acquired Oldsmobile later that year.
General Motors is both active in environmental causes and, as a major industrial force, implicated in ecologically harmful activity.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/General_Motors   (4416 words)

  
 General Motors Corporation Reference @ IntAdopt.com (International Adoption)   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-03)
Current members of the board of directors of General Motors are: Percy Barnevik, Erskine Bowles, John Bryan, Armando Codina, February 6, 2006 to represent Kirk Kerkorian, as E.
In the 1970s and 1980s, GM pushed Diesel engines and cylinder deactivation technologies to disastrous results due to poor durability in the Oldsmobile diesels (this was a modified gasoline engine) and drivability issues in the Cadillac 4-6-8 variable cylinder engines.
As a great bulk of GM's fleet fuel consumption is by high fuel consuming light trucks and SUVs, a modest improvement in their mileage applied across this large fleet (say twelve to fifteen percent) would in fact conserve a significant amount of refined fuel.
www.intadopt.com /encyclopedia/General_Motors_Corporation   (2911 words)

  
 General Motors Streetcar Conspiracy - General Motors Streetcar Conspiracy News   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-03)
Our General Motors Streetcar Conspiracy website is too advanced so we have not much managed to assistance lots of content, however what we have done so far is researched the too best General Motors Streetcar Conspiracy sites on the net.
The idea that the streetcar system was "stolen" from appreciative Angelenos through a "conspiracy" led by General Motors -- perhaps best expressed in the plot line of the movie "Who Framed Roger Rabbit?" -- remains popular.
According to the General Motors streetcar conspiracy, General Motors and a...
rafael.blogmobs.com /General_Motors_Streetcar_Conspiracy   (856 words)

  
 YWWI - General Motors   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-03)
General Motors Corporation, also known as GM, is a United States-based automobile maker with worldwide operations and brands including Buick, Cadillac, Chevrolet, GMC, Holden, Hummer, Opel, Pontiac, Saturn, Saab and Vauxhall.
Toyota General Motors (GM) was founded in 1902 as a holding company for Buick, then controlled by William C. Durant, and acquired Oldsmobile later that year.
He wanted each General Motors division to target one class of buyer, and in his new scheme Buick was near the top—only the luxurious Cadillac brand had more prestige.
www.infoax.com /en/General+Motors   (10396 words)

  
 Taken for a Ride - How General Motors (GM) Conspired to Destroy Rail Trolley Systems
The center of the road was reserved for streetcars, and the new automobiles had to move out of the way.
National City Lines, General Motors and the other defendants were found guilty of conspiracy to monopolize the local transportation field.
And the individuals involved—like the treasurer of General Motors who had actively run Pacific City Lines, one of the subsidiaries, and was a major moving factor in all of National City Lines' operations—he was fined the magnanimous sum of $1 at the conclusion of the trial.
www.culturechange.org /issue10/taken-for-a-ride.htm   (1597 words)

  
 THE OTHER SIDE OF THE 'TROLLEY CONSPIRACY' |
In fairness, he is only one of many who have heard only side of the story of how General Motors Corporation and other major industrials were supposed to have destroyed streetcars in cities from coast to coast and chosen to believe what they have heard or read without question.
The facts are, streetcars and electric interurbans were an important part of the American transportation scene for many years – and then, their time passed and they all but disappeared, not due to conspiracy or malice, but because they became fundamentally uneconomical given competition from more modern superior technologies.
Of course, the fundamental economic and transportation advantages of bus over streetcars – and their more recent incarnation, light rail – has not changed since the conversion from streetcars to buses began over eighty years ago, but that is a discussion for another time and place.
www.evworld.com /syndicated/evworld_article_881.cfm   (1156 words)

  
 Paving the Way for Buses The Great GM Streetcar Conspiracy
By Guy Span, S.D. In Part I, we found that General Motors (GM) was introduced to the concept of buying up transit and replacing it with "modern" buses thanks to the animosity towards transit of New York Mayor Hylan and newspaper owner William Randolph Hearst back in the 1920s.
And when they arrived, the reception was generally favorable as the buses could deposit their riders at the curb and not in the middle of the street (at safety islands, like streetcars).
Streetcars, he noted, behaved predictably and kept to their tracks, letting passengers off at islands and the passengers would only have to cross one-half the street.
www.baycrossings.com /Archives/2003/04_May/paving_the_way_for_buses_the_great_gm_streetcar_conspiracy.htm   (2622 words)

  
 The StreetCar Conspiracy
The electric streetcar, contrary to Van Wilkin's incredible naïve whitewash, did not die a natural death: General Motors killed it.
He even endeavored to whitewash GM's criminal conviction regarding National City Lines, declaring, not without sarcasm, that "no one was convicted of plotting to destroy the street railway industry." In fact, everyone involved knew that GM's purpose in organizing National City was, precisely, to destroy the electric railways and to replace them with GM buses.
He refused, in his piece, to admit GM had motorized a single system: when he alluded, for example, to the motorization of Manhattan, he said only that its railway "came under the control of bus interests."
www.lovearth.net /gmdeliberatelydestroyed.htm   (1416 words)

  
 eHistory at OSU | Old Columbus: Transportation
The Great American Streetcar Scandal, also known as the General Motors streetcar conspiracy refers to General Motors, Firestone Tire, Standard Oil of California and Phillips Petroleum forming National City Lines (NCL) holding company, which acquired most streetcar systems throughout the United States, dismantled them, and replaced them with buses in the early 20th Century.
The scandal alleges that NCL's companies had an ulterior motive to forcibly gain mass use of the automobile among the U.S. population by buying up mass light rail transportation and dismantling it.
However, GM was indeed the most prominent of the companies engaged in this behavior and had engaged in similar behavior before the scandal took place.
ehistory.osu.edu /osu/mmh/oldcolumbus/trans.cfm   (1192 words)

  
 General Motors streetcar conspiracy Information   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-03)
The Great American Streetcar Scandal, also known as the General Motors streetcar conspiracy refers to General Motors, Firestone Tire, Standard Oil of California and Phillips Petroleum forming National City Lines (NCL) holding company, which acquired most streetcar systems throughout the United States, dismantled them, and replaced them with buses in the; early 20th Century.
The proceedings were against General Motors, its subsidiary National City Lines, and seven other corporations.
The charges, in summary, were conspiracy to acquire control of a number of transit companies, forming a transportation monopoly (all defendants were acquitted on this charge), and conspiring to monopolize sales of buses and supplies to companies owned by National City Lines (General Motors alone was convicted on this charge).
general-motors-streetcar-conspiracy.zdnet.co.za /zdnet/General_Motors_streetcar_conspiracy   (1356 words)

  
 GM Resources & Information - free gm service manual
General Motors Corporation NYSE: GM, also known as GM, is a United States-based automobile maker with worldwide operations and brands including Buick, Cadillac, Chevrolet, Daewoo, GMC, Holden, Hummer, Opel, Pontiac, Saturn, Saab, and Vauxhall.
Albert Kahn's General Motors Building, 3044 West Grand Boulevard, Detroit, MIGeneral Motors was founded in 1908 as a holding company for Buick, then controlled by William C. Durant, and acquired Oldsmobile later that year.
General Motors has recently recovered from their losses suffered from their proposed battery technology and has invested over US$1.1 billion dollars into developing and researching hydrogen fuel cells.
www.bizhisto.com /gm.htm   (2560 words)

  
 Site personnel de François Pepin
He stated that General Motors caused the demise of America's streetcar system and that without GM's interference streetcars would be alive and well today.
General Motors and its subsidiary, National City Lines, along with the other corporations were indicted on two counts under the Sherman Antitrust Act.
General Motors was convicted on the second count: "to monopolize the sale of supplies used by the local transportation companies controlled by the City Lines defendants."
pages.infinit.net /fpepin/pfgm.htm   (396 words)

  
 HA: General Motors
Olds Motor Vehicle Company, Inc., the oldest unit of General Motors Corporation, is organized by Ransom E. Olds with capital of $50,000 (5,000 shares of stock at $10 per share) and the first Oldsmobile is produced.
The Oakland Motor Car Co., predecessor to Pontiac Motor, is founded by Edward M. Murphy on August 28, 1907 in Pontiac, Michigan.
General Motors purchases Cadillac for $5.5 million on July 29, 1909.
hermosaautomotive.com /GM.html   (1091 words)

Try your search on: Qwika (all wikis)

Factbites
  About us   |   Why use us?   |   Reviews   |   Press   |   Contact us  
Copyright © 2005-2007 www.factbites.com Usage implies agreement with terms.