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Topic: Genetically modified organism


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In the News (Tue 23 Jul 19)

  
  ScienceDaily: Genetically modified organism   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-29)
Genetically modified organism -- A genetically modified organism (GMO) is an organism whose genetic material has been altered using techniques in genetics generally known as recombinant DNA technology.
Transgenic plants -- Transgenic plants are plants that have been genetically engineered, a breeding approach that uses recombinant DNA techniques to create plants with new characteristics.They are identified as a class...
Genetic recombination -- Genetic recombination is the transmission-genetic process by which the combinations of alleles observed at different loci in two parental individuals become shuffled in offspring individuals.
www.sciencedaily.com /encyclopedia/Genetically_modified_organism   (1390 words)

  
  Genetically modified organism
A genetically modified organism or GMO (or genetically modified micro-organism, GMM) is any organism in which the genetic material DNA has been altered (modified) in a way that does not occur naturally by mating or natural recombination.
Both the terms GE (Genetically Engineered) and GMO (Genetically Modified Organism) are commonly used to refer to all organisms that have added genes from another species which were inserted through the techniques of genetic engineering.
The practice of genetic modification, as a scientific technique, is unrestricted in the United States; individual GMO crops are subject to intense study before being brought to market and are common in the United States and estimates of their market saturation vary widely.
www.ebroadcast.com.au /lookup/encyclopedia/gm/GMO.html   (1228 words)

  
 Genetically modified organism Summary
By introducing new genetic material into a cell or individual, a transgenic organism is created that has new characteristics it did not have befo...
A genetically modified organism, or GMO, is an organism whose genetic structure has been altered by incorporating a single gene or multiple genes—from another organism or species—that adds, removes, or modifies a trait in the organism by...
This essay is an arugument for the use of GMO's in agriculture.
www.bookrags.com /Genetically_modified_organism   (185 words)

  
 Genetically Modified Organism Crop
Genetically Modified alter the genetics of living organisms such as animals, plants, or bacteria.
Genetically Modified Organisms are used world-wide and do create a lot of good in the world but they are rapidly turning more and more heads the wrong way on their products.
Throughout the entire world all distribution of the genetically modified crops have reached 10,313, maize is the top crop with roughly 39%, then rape with 13%, potato-12%, soybean-9%, tomato-8%, cotton-7%, tobacco-4%, sugar beet-4%, wheat-1%, rice, melon, and alfalfa all came in with 1% as well.
www.geocities.com /chris_hofeldt/GMO_crop.html   (1022 words)

  
 Genetically Modified Food
Genetic modification, also interchangably known as genetic engineering or gene splicing, is a set of technologies that alter the genetic makeup of living organisms, such as animals, plants, or bacteria (1).
Opponenets of genetically modified food often refer to genetically modified foods as “Frankenfood,” after the monster in Mary Shelley’s novel Frankenstein, for whom the book is named, in response to the decision of the FDA to allow the marketing of genetically modified food (3).
Golden rice, which is genetically modified rice varieties contain increased levels of vitamn A. The rice may serve to alleviate the vitamin A deficiency that contributes to the death of 500,000 people a year (3).
www.sunflowerstrewn.wordpress.com   (2829 words)

  
 NERC - What is a genetically modified organism?
A genetically modified organism (or GMO) is an organism that has had its DNA altered for a particular purpose.
GMOs are already used in the UK to produce medicines such as antibiotics, painkillers, vaccines, insulin and growth hormones, and some foods that rely on bacteria (such as some cheese and yoghurts).
DNA carries instructions for making all the structures and materials an organism needs, including instructions for which parts of the genetic code (individual genes) are switched on, when, and to what extent.
www.nerc.ac.uk /research/issues/geneticmodification/what.asp   (282 words)

  
 The Ultimate Genetically modified organism Dog Breeds Information Guide and Reference
Examples are diverse, and include commercial strains of wheat that have been modified by irradiation since the 1950s, transgenic experimental animals such as mice, or various microscopic organisms altered for the purposes of genetic research.
Three processes are known by which the genetic composition of bacteria can be altered: transformation,is a process by which some bacteria are naturally capable of taking up DNA to acquire new genetic traits.
Individual genetically modified crops (such as soybeans) are subject to intense study before being brought to market and are common in the United States, but estimates of their market saturation vary widely.
www.dogluvers.com /dog_breeds/GMO   (1221 words)

  
 Genetically modified organism   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-29)
Examples diverse and include commercial strains of wheat that have been modified by irradiation the 1950s transgenic experimental animals such mice various microscopic organisms altered for the purposes genetic research.
Like bacteria and plants animals can be genetically modified by viral However the genetic modification occurs only in cells that become infected and in most these cells are eventually eliminated by the immune system.
By selecting mice germ cells (sperm or egg producing cells) from the modified cell and interbreeding them that contain the genetic modification in all their cells will be born.
www.freeglossary.com /Genetically_modified_organism   (1045 words)

  
 Lycos Retriever: Search results for genetically modified organism
Genetic engineering, [R]ecombinant DNA technology, genetic modification/manipulation (GM) and gene splicing are terms that are applied to the manipulation of genes, generally implying that the process is outside the organism's natural reproductive process.
The Department of Genetics, established in 2000, is one of six basic science departments in the School of Medicine.
Genetic engineering is a radical new technology, one that breaks down fundamental genetic barriers -- not only between species, but between humans, animals, and plants.
www.lycos.com /info/genetically-modified-organism--crops.html   (717 words)

  
 Genetically Modified Foods
A genetically modified food is a food product derived in whole or part from a genetically modified organism (GMO) such as a crop plant, animal or microbe such as yeast.
Genetic engineering or genetic modification (GM) refers to technologies that allow single genes to be inserted or altered in living organisms such as animals, plants, or bacteria.
Combining genes from different organisms is known as recombinant DNA technology, and the resulting organism is said to be "genetically modified," "genetically engineered," or "transgenic." Genetic engineering may more correctly be termed genetic re-contextualisation where genes can be transferred to new contexts in order to generate new characteristics.
www.crystalinks.com /gmproducts.html   (2243 words)

  
 Genetically Modified Organisms   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-29)
By selecting mice whose germ cells (sperm or egg producing cells) developed from the modified cell and interbreeding them, pups that contain the genetic modification in all of their cells will be born.
The practice of genetic modification as a scientific technique is not restricted in the United States.
Individual genetically modified crops (such as soya) are subject to intense study before being brought to market and are common in the United States, but estimates of their market saturation vary widely.
www.edinformatics.com /biotechnology/genetically_modified_organisms.htm   (1067 words)

  
 Christian Aid report Biotechnology and genetically modified organisms
However, the terms biotechnology, genetic engineering and genetic modification are all commonly used to refer to the artificial insertion of genes from one organism into another, resulting in the creation of a transgenic or genetically modified organism (GMO).
The technology allows a selected characteristic or trait of one organism to be added to another - the toxin-producing trait of a bacteria, for example, to be given to a crop plant in order to deter insect pests.
Genetic engineering is a significant change from past methods of developing crop types which were based on crossing and selecting from existing and usually related organisms.
www.christian-aid.org.uk /indepth/0001biot/biotech.htm   (3044 words)

  
 Say No To GMOs! - Getting Started   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-29)
Genetically Modified Organism is the most common usage (though 'manipulated' or even 'mutated' might also be appropriate!) The acronyms GEO (Genetically Engineered Organism) or simply GM or GE are also used.
Genetically Modified Soy Affects Posterity - In a recent Russian study, the three-week mortality rate of offspring fed GE-soy was 50%!
Genetically Engineered Foods Pose Higher Risk for Children - Why children are at risk from the effects of genetically engineered food.
www.saynotogmos.org   (915 words)

  
 Genetically Modified Organisms   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-29)
Genetically Modified Organism is a living organism the genetic structure of which was changed.
Virtually all plants used in agriculture are Genetically Modified in the sense that they are the products of selective breeding programs, and present-day crops are genetically far removed from their wild predecessors, the Parliamentary Office of Science and Technology reports.
In the United States, Genetically Modified plants are being regulated by a patchwork of three agencies: the EPA (Environmental Protection Agency), FDA (Food and Drug Administration), and the USDA (United States Department of Agriculture) (What You Should Know About Genetically Modified Foods!).
www.tashschool.org /technological_progress/GMOs.htm   (1214 words)

  
 Genetically Modified Organisms   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-29)
Genetic modification can be used in many ways to control a variety of traits of organisms, and the consequences of one manipulation may be completely different from another based on the traits modified.
The term, LMO or living modified organism, refers to a GMO that is still alive, such as a fresh fruit or vegetable or a seed that has been modified using recombinant DNA.
The use of the terms GMO and LMO can be somewhat confusing, however, because, if you think about it, many crops have been genetically modified through traditional plant breeding for thousands of years.
www.colorado.edu /chemistry/bioinfo/GeneticallyModifiesOrganisms.htm   (338 words)

  
 Genetically Modified Foods
A good example is golden rice, which was genetically modified with genes from a daffodil so it had more beta carotene.
Genetically modified foods appear to have the same risks and benefits for health as other foods do.
The FDA, EPA, and USDA regulate genetically modified foods, and they require extensive safety data before a new genetically modified crop is released.
www.breastcancer.org /nutr_food_prod_genmod.html   (307 words)

  
 Choike - African Model Law on Safety in Biotechnology
Any approval for import, contained use, release or placing in the market of a genetically modified organism shall require the applicant to carry out monitoring and evaluation of risks on a continuing basis for a period commensurate with the life cycle of the species, as determined by the Competent Authority.
The risk assessment of a genetically modified organisms or a product of a genetically modified organism shall be carried out by the applicant or the Competent Authority as appropriate, on a case by case basis and shall be done in accordance with Annex III.
Any genetically modified organism or product of a genetically modified organism shall be clearly identified and labelled as such, and the identification shall specify the relevant traits and characteristics given in sufficient detail for purposes of traceability.
www.choike.org /nuevo_eng/informes/4115.html   (4652 words)

  
 The Genetically Modified Organisms (Contained Use) Regulations 1992
(f) the stability of the genetic traits of the organism;
(a) the factors affecting survival, multiplication and dissemination of the modified organism in the environment;
(f) the anticipated mechanism and result of interaction between the modified organism and the organisms which might be exposed in case of the escape of the organism;
www.opsi.gov.uk /si/si1992/Uksi_19923217_en_10.htm   (693 words)

  
 Genetically modified organism - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Thus, the abilities or the phenotype of the organism, or the proteins it produces, can be altered through the modification of its genes.
The term generally does not cover organisms whose genetic makeup has been altered by conventional cross breeding or by "mutagenesis" breeding, as these methods predate the discovery of the recombinant DNA techniques.
Examples of GMOs are diverse, and include transgenic experimental animals such as mice, several fish species, transgenic plants, or various microscopic organisms altered for the purposes of genetic research or for the production of pharmaceuticals.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Genetically_modified_organism   (2669 words)

  
 Genetically modified organism - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The first GMO was created in 1973 by Stanley N. Cohen and Herbert Boyer, demonstrating the creation of a functional organism that combined and replicated genetic information from different species.
Genetic modification involves genetic engineering, also known as gene splicing, a technique to splice together DNA fragments from more than one organism and thus preparing a "recombinant" DNA molecule in a test tube, producing a single piece of genetic material containing the original information from multiple fragments which can then be inserted into another organism.
Genetically modified characters, whether as heroes, villains, or backdrop, feature prominently in many works of fiction, in particular science fiction and cyberpunk, where it is used as a plot device to explain differences in a character or setting, such as explaining increased longevity or eradication of disease in a fictional civilization.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Genetically_Modified_Organism   (2669 words)

  
 genetically modified organism
Suttie said recombinant human insulin, injected by diabetics worldwide, was an example of a genetically modified organism used to produce a drug beneficial to...
Genetically modified organism (GMO): An inexact term that refers to a life form changed through genetic engineering.
IN response to letters published recently on genetically modified organism technology, I believe in 50 to 100 years time people will be wondering what all the...
www.mongabay.com /igapo/biotech/genetically_modified_organism.html   (709 words)

  
 Genetically modified foods (PRB 99-12E)
Since "biotechnology" can include numerous processes and applications, the term "genetically modified" is applied only to products that have been genetically engineered;(2) that is, where genetic material (deoxyribonucleic acid or DNA) has been manipulated or where genes from one organism (animal, plant species or microorganism) have been transferred to the genetic material of another.
The term "genetically modified food" is used when the GMO is consumed in plant form (tomatoes, potatoes), or processed (in tomato sauce, canola oil), or used as an additive in more complex products (cornstarch, soya lecithin).
Opponents of genetically modified foods claim that, because these products have not been adequately tested, their long-term effects on human health remain unknown, particularly because interaction between genes is not yet fully understood.
dsp-psd.communication.gc.ca /Collection-R/LoPBdP/BP/prb9912-e.htm   (3743 words)

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