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Topic: Genitive case


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  Russian Language Lesson 10 - The Russian Genitive Case - Main Lesson - Russian Language Lessons
As the genitive case relates to possession, it is also used to create a way of saying ‘to have’ or ‘to not have’.
For example, in the first sentence: “Брат”(brother) is the subject of the sentence and uses the nominative case, “Адама” (Adam) is the owner of the first noun and uses the genitive case, “Москву” (Moscow) is the direct object of the verb and uses the Accusative case.
The genitive case is used to correspond to the English word ‘of’.
www.russianlessons.net /lessons/lesson10_main.php   (943 words)

  
  Genitive case   (Site not responding. Last check: )
In grammar, the genitive case (or possessive case; also called the second case when discussing certain languages) is the case that marks a noun as being the possessor of another noun.
The 18th century explanation that the apostrophe might replace a genitive pronoun, as in "the king's horse" being a shortened form of "the king, his horse", is erroneous (a construction which actually occurs in German dialects and has replaced the genitive there, together with the "of" construction that also exists in English).
In Baltic-Finnic languages, the accusative case -(e)n is homophonic to the genitive case.
www.dejavu.org /cgi-bin/get.cgi?ver=93&url=http://articles.gourt.com/%22http%3A%2F%2Farticles.gourt.com%2F%3Farticle%3Dgenitive   (1059 words)

  
  Genitive case
The genitive case is a grammatical case that indicates a relationship, primarily one of possession, between the noun in the genitive case and another noun.
The 18th century explanation that the apostrophe might replace a genitive pronoun, as in "the king's horse" being a shortened form of "the king, his horse", is erroneous (a construction which actually occurs in German dialects and has replaced the genitive there, together with the "of" construction that also exists in English).
These are sometimes not identified as the genitive case, and in many instances are not marked with the apostrophe, but these usages demonstrate use of nouns in the genitive case as adverbs in the Germanic language, indicating the time when the events described happen.
www.brainyencyclopedia.com /encyclopedia/g/ge/genitive_case.html   (1165 words)

  
 Reference.com/Encyclopedia/Genitive case
In grammar, the genitive case or possessive case (also called the second case) is the case that marks a noun as being the possessor of another noun.
In some languages, nouns in the genitive case may be found in inclusio — that is, between the main noun's article and the noun itself.
The 18th century explanation that the apostrophe might replace a genitive pronoun, as in "the king's horse" being a shortened form of "the king, his horse", is debated.
www.reference.com /browse/wiki/Genitive   (1255 words)

  
  Kids.Net.Au - Encyclopedia > Genitive case
The genitive case is a form of a noun that indicates the possessive case of a noun, i.e.
It is a common misconception that English nouns have a genitive case, marked by the possessive " 's " ending.
Linguists however have shown that the English possessive is not a case at all, but rather a clitic, an independent word which however is always written and pronounced as part of the preceding word.
www.kids.net.au /encyclopedia-wiki/ge/Genitive_case   (334 words)

  
 GENITIVE
Genitive of Material: this term identifies the use of the genitive to specify the material out of which something is made: a statue of marble, rivers of milk and honey, books of examples, and so on.
Genitive of Characteristic: this name sounds almost redundant with the category "genitive of description," but grammar is a technical study and this is a technical term with a very precise meaning.
When the genitive case is found with the verb "to be" (or equivalent expresssion), apparently NOT modifying a noun but followed by an infinitive, we have a genitive of characteristic.
omega.cohums.ohio-state.edu /latin/grammar/genitive_case.htm   (1038 words)

  
 German Grammar: The Genitive Case - Grammatik der deutschen Sprache: Der Genitiv
The genitive is rendered in English as a possessive with an 's or with the preposition of.
"The rain" is the object of the genitive prep.
"(Of) the murder" is the genitive object of the adjective "guilty".
www.vistawide.com /german/grammar/german_cases_genitive.htm   (554 words)

  
 Case in German
The subject of a sentence is in the nominative case.
The indirect object is in the dative case.
Case describes the function of a noun or pronoun.
www.acampitelli.com /explain_case_in_German.htm   (996 words)

  
 Epiq Noun Cases
Summary: The dative case is used for the beneficiaries of class 1 and class 4 verbs, for the indirect objects or beneficiaries of class 2 verbs, and for the subjects of class 3 verbs.
The dative case is used to mark both the beneficiary and the indirect object of a class 2 verb.
The genitive case is used to mark the possessor of a possessed noun.
dedalvs.free.fr /epiq/ncases.html   (3024 words)

  
 RWT: Genitive case
Exercise 0008 Genitive plural of nouns and adjectives
The genitive case endings for feminine adjectives are the same as those for the dative and the prepositional case:
The genitive plural of adjectives is formed with the endings -ых and -их.
www.auburn.edu /~mitrege/RWT/tutorials/genitive.html   (722 words)

  
 [No title]
Genitive of Characteristic (Predicate Genitive)— this type of genitive occurs with a subject infinitive and is a noun in the genitive case which stands alone (or modified by and adjective) in the predicate denotes a characteristic or class: Hominis sapientis est libros legere.
Genitive of Indefinite Value— a few neuter adjectives and some nouns implying utter worthlessness, such as as, floccus, and nihilum, are sometimes used in the genitive case to express the value of a person, thing, or situation when that value is not specifically determined or is indefinite.
Genitive of the Charge—this genitive is used with verbs of accusing and condemning to express the charge or penalty.
people.bu.edu /lkd/gencase.doc   (596 words)

  
 The Russian Prepositions (Genitive Case)
These three core meanings and a few others are associated with the use of the genitive without prepositions and so it comes as no surprise that they are associated with prepositions which govern the genitive.
The genitive case is associated with non-existence and negation.
There are six genitive prepositions which indicate the origin or source of their objects: из(о)+Gen "(out) of", с(о)+Gen (down) from, от(о)+Gen "(away) from", из-за+Gen "from behind, because of", ис-под+Gen "from under", and после+Gen "after".
www.alphadictionary.com /rusgrammar/prepgen.html   (1697 words)

  
 0018Genitive use   (Site not responding. Last check: )
When a nown modifies another noun, it is in the genitive case.
The non-existence or absence of something or someone is expressed with the genitive case.
The preposition c will require a noun in the genitive case when it is used to indicate movement from a place or an activity.
www.auburn.edu /~mitrege/RWT/tutorials/0018genitive-use.html   (267 words)

  
 8 Case theory
For instance, the dative and ablative singular are homophonous for avus 'grandfather', the genitive and the dative singular are homophonous for femina 'woman', and the dative and the ablative plural are homophonous for both nouns.
Before addressing our main concern---how objective case is licensed on the embedded subject her, we digress briefly to provide an independent piece of evidence in favor of the structure in (35), which is based on the distribution of expletive there.
Case licensing is a relationship between a head and an 'outside' noun phrase (that is, a noun phrase distinct from any projections of the case-checking head).
www.ling.upenn.edu /courses/ling150/ch8.html   (6654 words)

  
 AUE: Genitive is Not Always Possessive
Over the years there have been postings to AUE that were based upon the misconception that the genitive case always indicates possession.
The genitive case is in fact used for several things besides possession.
He eventually threw up his hands and said that the genitive is the case that shows any relationship between two substantives.
alt-usage-english.org /genitive_and_possessive.html   (461 words)

  
 Greek Cases
The substantive in the nominative case is frequently the subject of a finite verb.
The substantive in the genitive case refers to the same thing as the substantive to which it is related.
In the genitive of apposition, the head noun will (1) state a large category, (2) be ambiguous, or (3) be metaphorical in its meaning, while the genitive names a concrete or specific example that either falls within that category, clarifies its ambiguity, or brings the metaphor down to earth.
www.bcbsr.com /greek/gcase.html   (4175 words)

  
 Syntactical Classification of Genitive Case
Genitive of Direct Object - after certain verbs - Many verbs, such as those of the five physical senses and of emotion, etc., require that their direct object be in the genitive case (as opposed to the accusative case which is normally expected).
Attributive Genitive - (Sometimes called the Descriptive Genitive.) - The word in the genitive case is being used as an adjective, describing an attribute or quality to the head noun.
Genitive of Source - Sometimes the genitive case indicates the source from which the head noun is derived or depends.
www.ntgreek.org /learn_nt_greek/classify-genitive.htm   (1288 words)

  
 Strong's Greek Dictionary - Bible Software by johnhurt.com
(genitive case) a waiter (at table or in other menial duties); specially, a Christian teacher and pastor (technically, a deacon or deaconess):--deacon, minister, servant.
(genitive case) to deliberate (by reflection or discussion):--cast in mind, consider, dispute, muse, reason, think.
(genitive case) to rout or separate; specially, to winnow; figuratively, to squander:--disperse, scatter (abroad), strew, waste.
www.htmlbible.com /sacrednamebiblecom/kjvstrongs/STRGRK12.htm   (922 words)

  
 Lesson 3
Case is also familiar to us, although we do not make form distinctions to the same degree that Greek does.
The subject is the word in the nominative case and the direct object is the word in the accusative case.
The objective case is used for a direct object, an indirect object, or for the object of a preposition.
www.ntgreek.net /lesson13.htm   (1894 words)

  
 Russian Language Lesson 11 - Russian Plurals - Main Lesson - Russian Language Lessons
These three cases are the most important when it comes to plurals, it is less common to use plurals in the other cases.
The genitive seems to have the most rules for the plural, but it generally ends in -ов (manculine) or it is cut short (feminine).
Quantity not specified - Use the case that is appropriate to the sentence position.
www.russianlessons.net /lessons/lesson11_main.php   (919 words)

  
 The Genitive Case in Latin
The chief use of the genitive case in Latin is to qualify nouns.
The word or words which are found in the genitive case DESCRIBE, DEFINE, or CLASSIFY the person or thing which is denoted by the noun which is being qualified.
The kinds of connections between the genitive and the noun which it qualifies are quite varied, and their complexity may well derive from the fact that some of the genitive ideas were once separate cases (as they still are in other related languages, like Sanscrit).
www.csun.edu /~hcfll004/genitive.html   (393 words)

  
 The Middle Dutch case system
The first case (nominative) can be used for the subject, the nominal part of the predicate or an addressed person.
In the latter case the gender and number of the relative pronoun are dependent on the antecedent, whilst the case is determined by its function in the subordinate clause.
The loss of case endings during the three centuries covered by Middle Dutch meant that the function of the sentence parts had to be shown in a different way.
www.ned.univie.ac.at /publicaties/taalgeschiedenis/en/mnlcasus.htm   (1311 words)

  
 The Russian Prepositions (Genitive Case)   (Site not responding. Last check: )
These three core meanings and a few others are associated with the use of the genitive without prepositions and so it comes as no surprise that they are associated with prepositions which govern the genitive.
The genitive case is associated with non-existence and negation.
There are six genitive prepositions which indicate the origin or source of their objects: из(о)+Gen "(out) of", с(о)+Gen (down) from, от(о)+Gen "(away) from", из-за+Gen "from behind, because of", ис-под+Gen "from under", and после+Gen "after".
www.departments.bucknell.edu /russian/language/prepgen.html   (1697 words)

  
 Zhyler Noun Cases
In this case, the noun in the genitive (which is the possessor) comes first, and the noun in the possessive (which is the possessed noun) comes second.
The state or condition, in Zhyler, is expressed with the nominative case, and the object (that is, the one who's left in that state) is expressed with the comitative.
As opposed to the caritive case, which is used with instruments that an action is completed without, and the privative case, which is used with individuals that an action is completed without, the abessive is used for possessions or persons (e.g., relatives) that one doesn't have.
dedalvs.free.fr /zhyler/ncases.html   (4416 words)

  
 grammar appendix   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Notice also that the nominative and accusative case endings are the same (-um in the singular; -a in the plural).
The dative case is used to indicate the indirect object in a sentence.
The case of the relative pronoun is determined by its function in the relative clause.
its.guilford.k12.nc.us /gcslatin/grammar/grammar_appendix.htm   (1692 words)

  
 Engl401 | Lessons | The Four Main Cases: Masculine and Neuter Strong Nouns
The genitive case is also used for a lot of other relationships more or less remotely analogous to possession.
For masculine strong nouns, the demonstrative pronoun alone signals the case: it is sé in the singular.
Unlike masculine nouns for which the demonstrative changes in the accusative (the object case, in the sentences we saw in Lesson 2) to þone, the neuter demonstrative does not change from nominative to accusative: it remains þæt, so word order alone may indicate which noun is the subject and which the object.
www.ucalgary.ca /UofC/eduweb/engl401/lessons/casestmn.htm   (770 words)

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