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Topic: Geography of Tunisia


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In the News (Fri 19 Jul 19)

  
 Tunisia - LoveToKnow 1911
TUNISIA (Regency of Tunis), a country of North Africa, under the protection of France, bounded N. by the Mediterranean, W. by Algeria, E. by Tripoli and S. by the Sahara.
Tunisia reaches farther north than any other part of Africa, Ras-al-Abiadh (Cape Blanc)' being in 37° 20' N. On the south the boundary of the Tunisian Sahara is undetermined, but it may be roughly placed at 31° N. This would give, therefore, a greatest length of something like 440 m.
In 1897 Great Britain surrendered her commercial treaty with Tunisia and agreed (subject to a special temporary privilege regarding cotton goods) to allow her commerce and all other relations with Tunisia to be subjected to the same conditions as those affecting all such relations between Britain and France.
www.1911encyclopedia.org /Tunisia   (8474 words)

  
  Tunisia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-20)
Tunisia was the site of Carthage, a state conquered by the Roman Empire, which withdrew in the 5th century.
Tunisia is in north Africa, between the Mediterranean Sea and the Sahara Desert.
Tunisia's association agreement with the European Union entered into force on 1 March 1998, the first such accord between the EU and Mediterranean countries to be activated.
www.bidprobe.com /en/wikipedia/t/tu/tunisia.html   (478 words)

  
 Tunisia - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
In 1159, Tunisia was conquered by the Almohad caliphs of Morocco.
Tunisia is in north Africa, between the Mediterranean Sea and the Sahara Desert and between Algeria and Libya.
Tunisia's association agreement with the European Union (EU) entered into force on March 1, 1998, the first such accord between the EU and Mediterranean countries to be activated.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Tunisia   (1082 words)

  
 Tunisia (07/94)
Tunisia's constitution was revised in 1988 to permit the president to serve for three five-year terms.
Tunisia's judiciary is headed by the Court of Cassation, whose judges are appointed by the president.
Tunisia and Algeria resolved a long-standing border dispute in 1993 and have cooperated in the construction of a natural gas pipeline through Tunisia that connects Algeria to Italy.
www.state.gov /outofdate/bgn/t/9621.htm   (2130 words)

  
 An MBendi Profile: An MBendi Country Profile for Tunisia including economic and travel overviews and directories of ...   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-20)
Tunisia is presently experiencing a process of economic reform and liberalization after decades of heavy state direction and participation in the economy.
Tunisia was the first country on the southern side of the Mediterranean to enter into a trade agreement with the EU.
Tunisia has a number of chambers of commerce and industry and details of these can be found via our Organisation Search, as can details of relevant government departments.
www.mbendi.co.za /cytucy.htm   (2024 words)

  
 An MBendi Profile: Tunisia - Overview   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-20)
Tunisia lies on the on the Mediterranean coast of Africa between Algeria and Libya and forms part of the North African Region.
Tunisia was the first country on the southern side of the Mediterranean to enter into a trade agreement with the EU.
Tunisia has a number of chambers of commerce and industry and details of these can be found via our Organisation Search, as can details of relevant government departments.
mbendi.co.za /cytucy.htm   (1545 words)

  
 Tunisia Demographics and Geography - Columbia Gazetteer of the World Online
Tunisia, occupying the E portion of the great bulge of N Africa, is bounded on the W by Algeria, on the N and E by the Mediterranean Sea, and on the SE by Libya.
Tunisia’s phosphate reserves are the largest in Africa, and iron ore, zinc, and lead are also mined.
In the mid-12th century, Tunisia was conquered and controlled by the Almohad caliphs of Morocco, and then by the Berber Hafsids (c.1230–1574).
www.columbiagazetteer.org /public/Tunisia.html   (1332 words)

  
 Tunisia Political, Economic Environmental Information News
A.D.) and the Byzantines (6th cent.), the Arabs conquered Tunisia in the 7th cent., and the Berber population was converted to Islam.
Tunisia was seized by the Ottoman Turks, and as one of the Barbary States it became a stronghold of pirates, on whom the treasury depended for several centuries.
Under Bourguiba, who was elected president-for-life in 1975, Tunisia was a moderate Arab state, following a generally pro-Western foreign policy; support for a negotiated settlement with Israel strained the country's relations with its Arab neighbors, however.
en.marweb.com /maghreb/tunisia   (512 words)

  
 Abou Nawas Hotels - Tunisia - Geography   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-20)
Tunisia is located in the extreme north-east of Africa, in the center of the Mediterranean basin.
Tunisia, marked off by the thirtieth and the thirty-seventh degrees of north latitude, is washed in the north and in the east by the Mediterranean.
Finally, the meridian Tunisia, determined in the north by the region of the Chotts.
www.abounawas.com /en/tunisie/geographie.htm   (217 words)

  
 ___SFAX___
Geography: To the northern part, relatively watered, essentially mountainous, open by the valley of Medjerda, oppose the Center and the South, formed of trays and full steppiqueses and desert.
The biggest rain explain the concentration of cultures (cereals, grapevine, olive tree) and of the bovine raising in the North and on the coastline, that regroups the major part of the population.
Sfax is the second Tunisian city after Tunis of the point of view number of inhabitants and economic activities, it plays an important role in the communication and the transport between south and middle of the country by its freeways, railroad, harbor and its airport.
noomenkrichen.netfirms.com /html/country.html   (870 words)

  
 Tunisia - Gurupedia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-20)
Tunisia is a Muslim Arab country situated on the North African
Tunisia was the site of Carthage, a state conquered by the Roman Empire, which withdrew in the
In 2008, Tunisia is a completely associated member of the E.U. (comparable to the status of Norway or Iceland).
www.gurupedia.com /t/tu/tunisia.htm   (437 words)

  
 Country Pages: Tunisia
Tunisia is considered to be one of the most liberal nations in the Islamic world, especially in terms of the rights accorded to women.
The official language of Tunisia is Arabic, although the use of French is widespread, reflecting the country's French colonial history.
Although it is the smallest country in North Africa, Tunisia has a remarkable range of geographical variety, from Mediterranean coastline, to the fertile mountain region, to the Sahara desert.
www.cies.org /country/tunisia.htm   (872 words)

  
 Tunisia Information
ften known as 'Green Tunisia', this is a delightful part of the country, a region of hills, mountains and fertile plains.
Sousse, a major port and Tunisia's third-largest city, is set in a convenient central position on the eastern coast.
Tunisia's most famous historic site is probably Carthage, in the suburbs of Tunis.
www.grouptravels.com /tunisia/tunisia_sights.html   (3670 words)

  
 Abou Nawas Tunis Hotel : Local Information
Tunisia is located in north Africa, in the center of the Mediterranean basin.
Tunisia, marked off by the thirtieth and the thirty-seventh degrees of north latitude, is washed in the north and in the east by the Mediterranean.
The rules of the road in force in Tunisia are the same as those enforced in western Europe.
www.abounawas-tunis.com /english/localinfo.cfm   (188 words)

  
 Tunisia Information, Tunisia Geography
The north and east proper of Tunisia is bordered by the Mediterranean Sea, with the Strait of Sicily lying to its northeast.
As far as fauna goes, the animals of Tunisia are gazelles of various species, jackals, sleeved mouflons and wild boars.
In the parts of Tunisia that fall in the Sahara region, scorpions and snakes like the horned viper are to be found.
www.mapsofworld.com /country-profile/tunisia-information-geography-history.html   (463 words)

  
 SESRTCIC   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-20)
Northern Tunisia, which is the most heavily populated part of the country, is a mountainous area relatively more fertile.
Tunisia’s climate is temperate with mild winters and hot summers.
Tunisia has a diversified economy with agriculture, mining, energy, tourism, and manufacturing as the important economic activities.
www.sesrtcic.org /members/tun/tunhome.shtml   (305 words)

  
 1Up Travel : Tunisia Geography and Facts
Tunisia, republic of northern Africa, bounded on the north and east by the Mediterranean Sea, on the south by Libya, and on the west by Algeria.
In general, a mild Mediterranean climate prevails in the north of Tunisia; toward the south the climate becomes progressively hotter and drier.
Tunisia is part of the Arab world, the Mediterranean area, and Africa.
www.1uptravel.com /geography/tunisia.html   (465 words)

  
 Tunisia: History, Geography, Government, and Culture — Infoplease.com
Tunisia was settled by the Phoenicians in the 12th century B.C. By the sixth and fifth centuries B.C., the great city-state of Carthage (derived from the Phoenician name for “new city”) dominated much of the western Mediterranean.
The constituent assembly deposed the bey on July 25, 1957, declared Tunisia a republic, and elected Habib Bourguiba as president.
Tunisia refused to break relations with the U.S. during the Arab-Israeli War in June 1967.
www.infoplease.com /ipa/A0108050.html   (708 words)

  
 Star Wars: Kids | Where Did they Film Star Wars: Episode II?
Tunisia is a republic of northern Africa and is bounded by Libya, Algeria and the Mediterranean Sea.
The geography gives Tunisia an other-wordly appearance, which is very appropriate for Tatooine's exterior scenery.
Tunisia's geography is great, but the climate is another story.
www.starwars.com /kids/explore/bts/f20001016/indexp4.html   (392 words)

  
 Educational Geography Information -- Tunisia
If you are interested in geography you should also take a look at this educational geography card game for all ages.
Tunisia has agreed to gradually remove barriers to trade with the European Union over the next decade.
Broader privatization, further liberalization of the investment code to increase foreign investment, improvements in government efficiency, and reduction of the trade deficit are among the challenges for the future.
www.geographycards.com /countryinfo/ts.html   (1177 words)

  
 Tunisia Geography   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-20)
Tunisia is located in Northern Africa, bordering the Mediterranean Sea, between Algeria and Libya.
The terrain of Tunisia includes mountains in north; hot, dry central plain; semiarid south merges into the Sahara.
Tunisia is temperate in north with mild, rainy winters and hot, dry summers; desert in south.
www.nationbynation.com /Tunisia/Geo.html   (48 words)

  
 "TUNISIA"
Littoral Tunisia is a region of plains and hills.
Little populated, little urbanized, internal Tunisia is the region the most sprayed with the country.
The second city of Tunisia, Sfax is the main metropolis of the South.
www.afcam.org /Anglais/PAYS/TUNISIE.htm   (402 words)

  
 Tunisia map, buy Tunisia maps and a Tunisia travel book from Map Town Ltd.
A Tunisia travel guide will help you understand the cultures and take advantage of the advice and experience acquired from other travelers who have been there before you.
Tunisia is found in northern Africa, bordering the Mediterranean Sea, between Algeria and Libya.
Attractions in Tunisia include the Roman ruins at Carthage, the beaches of Cap Bon Peninsula, and El-Jem, the well-preserved, ancient Roman colosseum.
www.maptown.com /tunisiamaps.html   (230 words)

  
 Tunisia Attractions -   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-20)
Tunisia facts: Official web sites of Tunisia, links and information on Tunisia's art, culture, geography, history, travel and tourism, cities, the capital city, airlines, embassies, tourist boards and newspapers.
Tunisia is now the 'blue ribbon' of African tourism, a long way ahead of Africa's other major tourist countries (Morocco, Egypt, Kenya, Senegal).
Tunisia's tertiary sector (services) is booming and is both the country's major employer (36...
attractions.fabcc.com /index.php?k=tunisia-attractions   (1072 words)

  
 AllRefer.com - Tunis (Tunisia Political Geography) - Encyclopedia
Access to the Gulf of Tunis (an arm of the Mediterranean) is by a canal terminating at a subsidiary port, Halq al Wadi (La Goulette).
Surviving from the Middle Ages are walls, an aqueduct, and a mosque.
Tunis became the capital of Tunisia under the powerful Hafsid dynasty (13th–16th cent.) and was a leading center of trade with Europe and the Eastern Mediterranean.
reference.allrefer.com /encyclopedia/T/Tunis.html   (315 words)

  
 Tunisia - T   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-20)
A catalogue of all the languages and dialects spoken in Tunisia, with details of the numbers of speakers of each language.
Basic reference information about Tunisia, such as area, capital, population, population density, geography, language, religion, time zone, history and government, plus business and social information, including details of accommodation, addresses, climate, regions, travel, visas, passports, money, health and public holidays.
The location, cemeteries, and economy of the area are detailed, and images illustrate its structures, a grave, and a skeleton, exposed as a result of excavations.
www.electronicsee.com /Resources/Tunisia.htm   (320 words)

  
 Tunisia
Tunisia has about 1.200 km coast all along the Mediterranean sea in the north and the west.
The Dorsale Tunisienne is a mountains chain (up to 1.200 m elevation) crossing the country from north east (Cap Bon) to central west.
Many horticulture activities can be found in Tunisia : fruit growing (olive tree represents about 80% of the total fruit acreage); vegetables; protected crops (including geothermal heating practices); flowers.
www.hridir.org /countries/tunisia/index.htm   (359 words)

  
 Umea6 Tunisia Travel Page - VirtualTourist.com
Tunisia has long been in travel brochures as one of top "all year round" destinations for Slovenians.
Tunisia is a small country, the size of UK without Scotland.
If you are a nature lover, the best time to visti Tunisia is in May or June, when the temperatures are not too high and the flowers are blooming all over.
members.virtualtourist.com /m/64aad/1017   (667 words)

  
 Tunisia on Encyclopedia.com   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-20)
Tunisia and the USA: Tunisia's President Zine El Abidine Ben Ali's visit to the United States at the invitation of US President George W Bush has become a crucial watershed in the political and economic relations...
Impact on workers of reduced trade barriers: the case of Tunisia and Morocco.
Tunisia: Observant Jewish life continues largely as it has for
www.encyclopedia.com /html/T/Tunisia.asp   (752 words)

  
 Background Notes Archive - Near East and North Africa
Terrain: Arable land in north and along central coast; south is mostly semiarid or desert.
ECONOMY Tunisia's economic growth historically has depended on oil, phosphates, agriculture, and tourism.
Health: Tunisia has no particular health hazards, but tapwater is not potable in certain seasons in Tunis.
dosfan.lib.uic.edu /ERC/bgnotes/nea/tunisia9407.html   (2416 words)

  
 Tunisia Africa
BBC Country Profile: Tunisia - The BBC provides a location map, historical, political and media overview and facts and figures.
Tunisia Online - Comprehensive guide to the history, culture, society, environment and economy of Tunisia.
Tunisia Page - General information and links for this North African country from the African Studies Center, University of Pennsylvania.
www.24up.org /Regional/Africa/Tunisia   (148 words)

  
 1Up Travel > Tunisia > Travel & Tourism | Tourist Guide to Tunisia
Modern Tunisians are the descendents of indigenous Berbers and of people from numerous civilizations that have invaded, migrated to and been assimilated into the population over the millenia.
The Muslim conquest in the 7th century transformed Tunisia's and the make-up of its population, with subsequent waves of migration from around the Arab and Ottoman world, including significant numbers of Spanish Moors and Jews at the end of the 15th century.
Tunisia became a center of Arab culture and learning and was assimilated into the Turkish Ottoman Empire in the 16th century.
www.1uptravel.com /international/africa/tunisia   (907 words)

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