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Topic: George Grosz


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  George Grosz Biografie
George Grosz wird 1893 als Georg Ehrenfried Groß in Berlin geboren und wächst in der pommerschen Stadt Stolp auf.
In diesen Jahren werden bereits in verschiedenen Zeitschriften literarische Beiträge und Zeichnungen des Künstlers veröffentlicht, die George Grosz in der Kunstwelt bekannt machen.
Unter Grosz' intensiver Mitarbeit erscheinen des weiteren mehrere Zeitschriften wie z.B. 1919 in Berlin "Die Pleite", "Der Gegner" und "Der blutige Ernst".
www.george-grosz.de   (0 words)

  
 Expressionismus | George Grosz
Grosz wurde Mitglied der Kommunistischen Partei Deutschlands (KPD).
Gleich nach der Machtübernahme der Nationalsozialisten werden seine Wohnung und sein Atelier gestürmt.
Grosz leidet unter depressiven Stimmungen, die zunehmenden Alkoholkonsum zur Folge haben.
www.deutsche-expressionisten.de /kuenstler/grosz_george/george_grosz.html   (0 words)

  
 George Grosz Online
George Grosz at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York City
George Grosz in the Los Angeles County Museum of Art Database
George Grosz at the Smithsonian American Art Museum, Washington D.C. Tate Gallery, London, UK Tehran Museum of Contemporary Art, Iran
www.artcyclopedia.com /artists/grosz_george.html   (592 words)

  
 [No title]
Best known for his Dada art and caustically satirical caricature works, Georg Ehrenfried Gross was born in Berlin in 1893, later changing his name to George Grosz.
Some consider him to be perhaps the most outstanding caricaturist and political satirist of the period following World War I. His father was Karl Ehrenfried Gross, an innkeeper, and his mother’s name was Marie Wilhelmine Luise.
When George was only seven his father died.
www.askart.com /artist/G/george_grosz.asp?ID=24391   (0 words)

  
  George Grosz
One doesn't make art with conviction alone.' In a somewhat more positive light, Grosz was described as a historical figure in the periodical Eulenspiegel in 1931: 'No other German artist so consciously used art as a weapon in the fight of the German workers during 1919 to 1923 as did George Grosz.
More in keeping with popular sentiment, Deutsche Kunst und Dekoration (German art and decoration) described Grosz as one-sided and pathological, 'too obstinate, too fanatical, too hostile to be a descendant of Daumier.' Although according to the magazine's art writer he was a master of form, his social point of view was wrongly chosen.
Grosz was unable to understand the American psyche to the degree that he had the German, and he returned to his homeland in an attempt to regain the momentum he had lost.
www.artchive.com /artchive/G/grosz.html   (799 words)

  
 George Grosz
George Grosz was born in Berlin in 1893.
Charged with blasphemy Grosz was at first found guilty but was then acquitted in 1932 during an appeal.
Grosz is a skillful political agitator, who uses his pencil, rather than words, for his propaganda.
www.greatwar.nl /georgegrosz/georgegrosz.html   (582 words)

  
 George Grosz
Kept from frontline action, Grosz was used to transport and guard prisoners of war.
Grosz was now diagnosed as suffering from shell-shock and was discharged from the German Army.
In 1932 Grosz was forced to flee from Nazi Germany and after settling in the United States became a naturalized citizen in 1938.
www.spartacus.schoolnet.co.uk /ARTgrosz.htm   (1062 words)

  
  Artist Mark Vallen's essay on George Grosz.
George Grosz was an amazing painter, illustrator, and caricaturist who combined his artistic talents with an uncompromising radicalism.
Grosz detested the bourgeoisie of Germany, and continually attacked and mocked them with his caustic pen drawings.
With exacting skill Grosz documented 1920's Germany and the rise of fascism, until he was forced into exile by the Hitler regime.
www.art-for-a-change.com /Express/ex10.htm   (285 words)

  
  George Grosz - Biography
George Grosz (July 26, 1893 - July 6, 1959) was a prominent member of the Berlin dadaist art movement.
Grosz was arrested during the Spartakus uprising in January 1919, but escaped using fake identification documents; He joined the Communist Party of Germany (KPD) in the same year.
Grosz left the KPD in 1922 after having spent five months in Russia and meeting Lenin and Trotsky, because of his antagonism to any form of dictatorial authority.
www.artinthepicture.com /artists/George_Grosz/biography.html   (381 words)

  
  George Grosz
George Grosz (July 26, 1893 - July 6, 1959) was a prominent member of the Berlin dadaist art movement.
Grosz was arrested during the Spartakus uprising[?] in January 1919, but escaped using fake identification documents; He joined the German Communist party[?] (KPD[?]) in the same year.
Grosz left the KPD in 1922 after having spent five months in Russia and meeting Lenin and Trotsky, because of his antagonism to any form of dictatorial authority.
www.ebroadcast.com.au /lookup/encyclopedia/ge/George_Grosz.html   (327 words)

  
 George Grosz Biography
Grosz was awarded his final honorary diploma in 1911, after studying for only two years.
Grosz was also an active co - publisher of severals journal in Berlin in 1919, such as 'Die Pleite', 'Der Gegner' and 'Der Blutige Ernst'.
One of Grosz' portfolio exhibited at this fair, 'Gott mit uns', led to a court case against the artist because of slandering the Reichswehr.
www.george-grosz.de /e/index.shtml   (400 words)

  
 George Grosz - Search Results - MSN Encarta   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Grosz, George (1893-1959), German American expressionist painter and illustrator.
George, town in southern South Africa, in Western Cape Province.
George is located on the main road between Cape Town, 370 km (230 mi) to the west,...
encarta.msn.com /George_Grosz.html   (123 words)

  
 ASU Art Museum | Collections: George Grosz
Grosz is a skillful political agitator, who uses his pencil, rather than words, for his propaganda.
Grosz is best known most for his drawings done during the time of the Weimar Republic.
Grosz gradually moved away from communism, in 1933 branded a “petty-bourgeois traitor and renegade”, and his art moved away with him.
asuartmuseum.asu.edu /collections/paper/groszhero1.htm   (760 words)

  
 George Grosz at AllExperts
George Grosz (July 26, 1893 â€" July 6, 1959) was a prominent member of the Berlin Dada and New Objectivity group, known especially for his savagely caricatural drawings of Berlin life in the 1920s.
George Grosz was born Georg Ehrenfried Groß in Berlin, Germany but changed his name in 1916 out of an enthusiasm for America.
Bitterly anti-Nazi, Grosz left Germany in 1932 and was invited to teach at the Art Students' League in New York in 1933.
en.allexperts.com /e/g/ge/george_grosz.htm   (710 words)

  
 George Grosz and the Communist Party: Art and Radicalism in Crisis, 1918 to 1936 - Review Art Bulletin, The - Find ...
In George Grosz and the Communist Party, Barbara McCloskey trains her analytic powers on the 1920s, yet she is less interested in examining Grosz's artistic output than, as her title makes clear, investigating the complex interactions that took place between George Grosz and the Communist Party in Weimar Germany.
Thus she is not as invested in exploring Grosz's psyche and biography as she is in investigating "the larger political, social, and cultural processes in which he was engaged" (p.
Grosz himself must have been aware, even before he observed that satire was worthless as a weapon of progressive politics, that the effects of artworks are highly mediated and unpredictable in their results.
findarticles.com /p/articles/mi_m0422/is_2_80/ai_54073975   (558 words)

  
 George Grosz and the Communist Party: Art and Radicalism in Crisis, 1918 to 1936 - Review Art Bulletin, The - Find ...
In George Grosz and the Communist Party, Barbara McCloskey trains her analytic powers on the 1920s, yet she is less interested in examining Grosz's artistic output than, as her title makes clear, investigating the complex interactions that took place between George Grosz and the Communist Party in Weimar Germany.
Thus she is not as invested in exploring Grosz's psyche and biography as she is in investigating "the larger political, social, and cultural processes in which he was engaged" (p.
Grosz himself must have been aware, even before he observed that satire was worthless as a weapon of progressive politics, that the effects of artworks are highly mediated and unpredictable in their results.
www.findarticles.com /p/articles/mi_m0422/is_2_80/ai_54073975   (558 words)

  
 Frontline 9 - George Grosz and the German Dadaists
Grosz, who in 1917 anglicised his name in a protest at the jingoism prevalent in Germany at that time, was one of the founders of Club Dada in Berlin along with John Heartfield, and Roul Hausmann among others.
Grosz himself despite leaving the KDP in 1924, concerned about the changes that were occurring in Russia after the death of Lenin, nevertheless still produced many biting, savage indictments of the state of the poor in Germanys Weimar Republic.
George Grosz along with a handful of others at the beginning of the last century have left us a huge legacy.
www.redflag.org.uk /frontline/nine/09grosz.html   (1425 words)

  
 FileRoom.org - George Grosz: German Caricaturist
Grosz and his publisher were each fined 6,000 marks and his offensive plates and drawings were ordered destroyed.
Grosz and his friend appealed and, in one of the most enlightened court decisions of the 1920s, were acquitted before a Berlin state supreme court.
In 1932 Grosz left for exile in the United States and was named by the Nazis "Cultural Bolshevik Number 1", deprived of his citizenship, and many of his works burned.
www.thefileroom.org /documents/dyn/DisplayCase.cfm/id/1157   (487 words)

  
 Berlin: The City as Body The City as Metaphor
By war's end in 1918 Grosz had developed an unmistakable graphic style that combined a highly expressive use of line with ferocious social caricature.
After emigrating to the United States in 1932, Grosz drew magazine cartoons, nudes, and landscapes and began teaching at the Art Students League of New York, where his appointment aroused controversy.
Grosz died in Berlin about three weeks after returning to Germany for a visit.
www.stanford.edu /dept/german/berlin_class/people/grosz.html   (339 words)

  
 Berlin of George Grosz by George Grosz in Hardcover at Smarter.com
Grosz was more than a merciless satirist and accurate social commentator: he was also one of the greatest artists of the age whose unerring, razor-sharp line and unique powers of observation were complemented by stylistic and technical innovations.
He put the fragmentation of Cubism and Futurism to new ends, gave a new dimension to the mysterious anonymity of metaphysical painting, and employed photomontage (he was one of the earliest practitioners) to reflect the energy and confusion of his period.
Grosz was a member of the artistic avant-garde, a key personality in the Dada movement, and he also appealed to a mass audience through his political cartoons, unmatched since Daumier's satirical works of the previous century.
www.smarter.com /berlin_of_george_grosz---pd--ch-1--pi-173672.html   (364 words)

  
 George Grosz Summary
George Grosz (July 26, 1893 – July 6, 1959) was a prominent member of the Berlin Dada and New Objectivity group, known especially for his savagely caricatural drawings of Berlin life in the 1920s.
George Grosz was born Georg Ehrenfried Groß in Berlin, Germany but changed his name in 1916 out of an enthusiasm for America.
Bitterly anti-Nazi, Grosz left Germany in 1932 and was invited to teach at the Art Students' League in New York in 1933.
www.bookrags.com /George_Grosz   (1082 words)

  
 Ivo Kranzfelder - George Grosz - Merlin.pl   (Site not responding. Last check: )
George Grosz (1893-1959) was one of the most important exponents of Dadaism, and therefore of political painting in general.
The decisive element in Grosz's paintings is their content: in them he pointed out defects in the political and social conditions, literally arraigning them before the public.
For Grosz, painting served as a political instrument: "I drew and painted from a sense of contradiction and through my work tried to convince the world that it was ugly, sick, and phoney." Grosz's paintings function as collages: the pictorial space is fragmented and thus takes on a futuristic aspect.
www.merlin.com.pl /frontend/towar/427999;jsessionid=33832D0F5F979E519CBFBFAB322C99C3.LB1   (299 words)

  
 George Grosz: Ecce Homo at SpaightwoodGalleries.com
Grosz: Ecce Homo /Grosz: Ecce Homo 2 / Grosz: Ecce Homo 3 / Grosz 4: Tartarin
Grosz was fascinated by amusement parks and the circus, and he particularly loved clowns.
Grosz used his art of the early Berlin years to attack the self-contentedness of the bourgeois, primarily its plutocrats, during the German Empire.
spaightwoodgalleries.com /Pages/Grosz.html   (884 words)

  
 Hofstra Museum, Permanent Collection, George Grosz
Grosz was born in Berlin, Germany in 1893.
Grosz was taken to court several times but although heavily fined, managed to escape imprisonment.
In 1932 Grosz was forced to flee Germany, and after settling in the United States became a naturalized citizen in 1938.
www.hofstra.edu /COM/Museum/museum_collection_93_9.cfm   (416 words)

  
 George Grosz - HighBeam Encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Grosz, George, 1893-1959, German-American caricaturist, draughtsman, and painter, b.
In postwar Germany, Grosz was famous for his vitriolic, satirical drawings attacking the corruption of German bourgeois society.
In 1924, Grosz began to paint, and in 1933 he accepted a position as art instructor at the Art Students League, New York City.
www.encyclopedia.com /doc/1E1-Grosz-Ge.html   (568 words)

  
 1914-18 war - Art of the First World War - 45 - George Grosz   (Site not responding. Last check: )
George Grosz, Explosion, 1917, oil on panel, 47.8 x 68.2 cm, Museum of Modern Art, New York.
In January 1917, Grosz, who up to then had been convalescing, was recalled to his unit.
Explosion was painted shortly afterwards, not as the memory of the fighting, but rather as an allegory of the destruction: a town is razed and catches fire in a bombardment and cannot escape the destructive fury that had taken hold of Europe.
www.art-ww1.com /gb/texte/045text.html   (140 words)

  
 Georg Grosz Comment
Grosz, as a soldier in WWI, experienced the horrors of a fat bureaucracy using its power to increase its control over the powerless.
'In a somewhat more positive light, Grosz was described as a historical figure in theperiodical Eulenspiegel in 1931: 'No other German artist so consciously used art as a weapon in the fight of the German workers during 1919 to 1923 as did George Grosz.
Grosz was unable to understand the American psyche to the degree that he had the German, and he returned to his homeland in an attempt to regain the momentum he had lost.
www.siu.edu /~dfll/German/groszcomment.htm   (824 words)

  
 The Engineer Heartfield, George Grosz (1920) | | Guardian Unlimited Arts
In the story of modern art, Grosz is a brilliant anomaly: a satirist and caricaturist whose brutal humour was instantly recognised by the avant-garde as avant-garde, yet was widely accessible.
While for Grosz the cutting and pasting of images in Dadaist photomontage was one weapon in an arsenal of graphic effects, for Heartfield it was a philosophy.
Distinguishing features: Grosz thinks it's great that Heartfield is clenched and grimacing like an evil thug, his heart a piece of photocollaged machinery, his head shaven and his fists ready for a brawl.
arts.guardian.co.uk /portrait/story/0,,743684,00.html   (390 words)

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