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Topic: George Mosse


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In the News (Fri 17 Aug 18)

  
  George Mosse Foundation
The George Mosse Foundation at the Universiteit van Amsterdam aims at the advancement of gay and lesbian studies.
The American historian George Mosse bequested a gift to the UvA at his death in 1999 which is a legacy acknowledging the importance of gay and lesbian studies in Amsterdam, especially of its cultural-historical approach to the study of homosexuality.
George studied history in Harvard and in 1955 he became professor of history at the University of Wisconsin in Madison.
www2.fmg.uva.nl /gl/mosseen.html   (556 words)

  
  George Mosse at AllExperts
Mosse was educated at an exclusive boys' school run by former Army officers, where, as a frail youth, he had difficulty with the demanding physical education regime imposed on the pupils.
Despite his background, Mosse was a self-proclaimed "Marxist of the heart", meaning that while he did not believe in Marxism as a theory, he nonetheless sympathized with it as an ideology.
Mosse graduated with a BS from Haverford College in 1941 and from Harvard with a PhD in 1946.
en.allexperts.com /e/g/ge/george_mosse.htm   (789 words)

  
  George Mosse - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
George Lachmann Mosse (September 20, 1918, Berlin, Germany-January 22, 1999, Madison, United States) was a German-born American left-wing Jewish gay historian of fascism in general and Nazi Germany in particular.
Mosse was educated at an exclusive boys' school run by former Army officers, where, as a frail youth, he had difficulty with the demanding physical education regime imposed on the pupils.
Mosse graduated with a BS from Haverford College in 1941 and from Harvard with a PhD in 1946.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/George_Mosse   (719 words)

  
 Gender book review: The Image of Man: the Creation of Modern Masculinity
Mosse does for our understanding of modern masculinity what nineteenth-century phrenology claimed to do for its practitioners: that is, he provides us with a key to interpreting the relationships that people made between surface appearances and the depths of mind and morality.
Mosse dates the birth of modern masculinity as occurring at the same time as the rise of bourgeois society, that is, between the second half of the eighteenth century and beginning of the nineteenth.
Mosse is cautious in his argument, and he qualifies many of his statements, but the extent to which such rebellions threatened the stereotype is, I believe, still exaggerated.
www.history.ac.uk /ihr/Focus/Gender/bourke.html   (2318 words)

  
 Fallen Soldiers by Peter Buitenhuis   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-22)
Mosse adds, however, that these ideals were confined largely to the elites of the combatant nations, but, after all, members of the elites created the propaganda that sustained the myth.
Mosse believes the simple, low-lying, fl wall that is the Vietnam War Memorial in Washington is emblematic of the new attitude.
Mosse is a historian of Germany and his work is far stronger on the German side of the question than that of any other country.
www.utpjournals.com /product/chr/721/soldiers10.html   (809 words)

  
 Response to George Mosse and David Myers. (Judaism, this issue, p. 134 and 142) - HighBeam Encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-22)
In Mosse's German Jews Beyond Judaism and Sorkin's The Transformation of German Jewry,(2) the sad story is told of German Jews who doggedly held on to their cosmopolitan faith in Goethe, Lessing, and Humboldt at a time when gentile Germans were trading theirs in for a much more sinister version of volkisch exclusivism.
Mosse hints at one of the costs when he notes a certain conservatism that has until very recently kept out new approaches in the humanities and social sciences.
Mosse, who strongly identifies with his own background in that tradition, writes that despite their failure in the German context, its defenders "in the long run.
www.encyclopedia.com /doc/1G1-18579334.html   (1548 words)

  
 George Mosse estate to benefit UW-Madison programs (Mar 30, 1999)
Famed historian George Mosse, who died Jan. 22, has named the College of Letters and Science as the major beneficiary of his estate.
Mosse, who died at age 80 after a brief illness, joined the UW-Madison faculty in the Department of History in 1955 and retired in 1988.
Mosse was revered by his students for his outstanding abilities as a teacher and respected internationally as a scholar.
www.news.wisc.edu /950.html   (543 words)

  
 The Nationalism Project: Toward the Final Solution Review
Mosse makes it clear very early in his book that it was not a lack of contact which bred fear of the unknown, but precisely the opposite.
Mosse writes "Political participation was defined by acting out a political liturgy in mass movements or in the streets and by seeking security through national myths and symbols which left little or no room for those who were different.
Mosse notes that Spanish activities during the sixteenth century constitute modern racism, but that it disappeared and thus could not be a precursor to the racism he is discussing.
www.nationalismproject.org /books/bookrevs/toward.htm   (2255 words)

  
 Untitled Document   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-22)
George L. Mosse, internationally recognized for his expertise in European culture and the roots of Hitler’s “final solution,” trained a generation of historians.
Mosse, who joined the Department of History in 1955 and was instrumental in establishing the College of Letters and Science’s Jewish Studies program, retired in 1988.
Mosse, also renowned for his scholarship on sexuality and concepts of masculinity, left other funds to be used to encourage UW—Madison studies in gay and lesbian history.
www.ls.wisc.edu /ALT/v6n1/Mosse.htm   (676 words)

  
 Conference to honor Mosse's scholarship (Aug 22, 2001)
Payne says that Mosse shifted his interest to the late 19th and 20th century, coming to rest on the intellectual evolution of European fascism, "its sociocultural history," says Payne, an expert on Italian fascism and the Spanish Civil War.
Born in Berlin, Germany in 1918, Mosse narrowly escaped Nazis persecution by fleeing to England in 1933.
The UW-Madison Institute for Research in the Humanities is sponsoring "An Historian's Legacy: George L. Mosse and Recent Research on Fascism, Society." With the exception of an opening night banquet Sept. 7, the conference is a free public event.
www.news.wisc.edu /6390.html   (508 words)

  
 FT May 2000: The Cultural Revolution of Facism
Half—measures and compromises, Mosse notes, were anathema to all Fascists; these were typical of the craven bourgeoisie, Fascists held, not of the virile Fascist "new man." For Nazi propagandist Joseph Goebbels, for example, a true National Socialist would willingly carry out a scorched—earth policy or ruthlessly gun down deserters.
Mosse views both as products of the modern liberation of the will—rival manifestations of "the people worshiping themselves." Both the French Revolution and fascism sought to transcend the mundane complexities of politics and create perfect societies; both rejected the West’s biblical heritage; both aestheticized politics in public festivals and songs.
Mosse, a historian and not a philosopher, remains on a somewhat superficial level in his account of fascism as a pathology of democratic modernity—as based, in essence, on a rejection of the West’s Jewish and Christian heritage.
www.leaderu.com /ftissues/ft0005/reviews/anderson.html   (1345 words)

  
 Commentary Magazine - Toward the Final Solution: A History of European Racism, by George L. Mosse   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-22)
...Mosse cites a work, published in 1816, which claimed that the presumed inability of Jews to speak proper German proved not only their alienness but their inferiority as well...
...The main 18th-century sources of racial thinking identified by Mosse are, on the one hand, the new science of the Enlightenment, which spread among the educated elite, and, on the other hand, the revival of pietism and evangelism among the masses...
...Mosse's book has the great merit of taking these pseudo-ideas seriously, not because they have any intrinsic worth (they do not) but because for generations they succeeded in capturing men's minds and insinuating their influence into political institutions, even governments...
www.commentarymagazine.com /Summaries/V66I6P88-1.htm   (1901 words)

  
 FIRST THINGS: A Journal of Religion, Culture, and Public Life   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-22)
Half-measures and compromises, Mosse notes, were anathema to all Fascists; these were typical of the craven bourgeoisie, Fascists held, not of the virile Fascist "new man." For Nazi propagandist Joseph Goebbels, for example, a true National Socialist would willingly carry out a scorched-earth policy or ruthlessly gun down deserters.
Mosse views both as products of the modern liberation of the will-rival manifestations of "the people worshiping themselves." Both the French Revolution and fascism sought to transcend the mundane complexities of politics and create perfect societies; both rejected the West’s biblical heritage; both aestheticized politics in public festivals and songs.
Mosse, a historian and not a philosopher, remains on a somewhat superficial level in his account of fascism as a pathology of democratic modernity-as based, in essence, on a rejection of the West’s Jewish and Christian heritage.
www.firstthings.com /ftissues/ft0005/reviews/anderson.html   (1378 words)

  
 What History Tells: George L. Mosse and the Culture of Modern Europe.(Book review) - HighBeam Encyclopedia
Several contributors to What History Tells note that George L. Mosse, who died in 1999 at eighty-one, was too restless to have been a monument.
Several days before 9/11, Mosse's considerable oeuvre [1946-20001, was the subject of a conference, "An Historian's Legacy: George L. Mosse and Recent Research on Fascism, Society, and Culture," held at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, where Mosse had taught since 1955.
They explore most, though not quite all, of the major themes of Mosse's work and help to explain its genesis, its unique character, and also some part of its impact on the world of historical scholarship.
www.encyclopedia.com /doc/1G1-158156389.html   (439 words)

  
 H-Net Review: H. Glenn Penny on What History Tells: George L. Mosse and the Culture of Modern Europe   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-22)
Mosse also made a point of intervening in his colleagues' debates with bold statements and calculated provocations meant to break down the parameters that constrained their analyses.
Gentile, in fact, writes of a "Mosse revolution" in the study of fascism, which consisted "first of all in the novelty of his method of analysis, which in turn was a consequence of a way of envisaging history and the historian's task" (p.
Mosse was engaged in explaining how the individual could be caught up in the exciting rhythm of mass movements, and he made a point of taking the leaders of these movements seriously.
www.h-net.org /reviews/showrev.cgi?path=49531101756806   (1761 words)

  
 THE REVOLUTIONARY APPEAL OF FASCISM - New York Times
Mosse assures his readers that ''these essays are concerned with the national myths, symbols, and stereotypes that made it possible for many men and women to confront the burdens of life: they are the filters through which reality is perceived.''
Mosse finds that although ''the Germans were steeped in what we may call liberal literature,'' their reading had only a very tenuous ''relationship to reality.''
Mosse is amply justified in emphasizing that ''the revolutionary appeal of Fascism is easy to underestimate,'' that it ''attracted a motley crowd of followers from different backgrounds and of all classes.'' But I do not agree with him when he adds ''...
query.nytimes.com /gst/fullpage.html?res=9F02EFDA133BF93BA35751C0A967948260&sec=&pagewanted=print   (1141 words)

  
 Jeet Heer, "George Mosse and the Academic Closet"
Mosse didn’t just study European history, he was born into it.
Mosse’s emergence as a major scholar was closely tied up with his increasing comfort with his identity as a gay Jew.
Mosse was all too aware that as part of its cultural project, fascism upheld an ideal of masculinity that defined both gays and Jews as abnormal.
www.jeetheer.com /politics/mosse.htm   (1073 words)

  
 Guide to the Papers of George L. Mosse (1918-1999), 1780-2001 LBI AR 25137
George L. Mosse was born Gerhard Lachmann-Mosse in Berlin on September 20, 1918 to a well-to-do Jewish family.
In the 1980s George L. Mosse analyzed the concepts and perceptions of beauty, sexuality, and policies of public and social hygiene, in particular the political implications of perceived deviations from the norms of nineteenth century middle class society.
Articles from the later period usually reflect George Mosse's opinions on the grave social and historical issues such as the rise of the neo-nazism, the roots of fascism, the convoluted German history in the 19th and 20th century, and later the questions of sexuality, masculinity, and homosexuality.
www.cjh.org /academic/findingaids/lbi/nhprc/GLMosse.html   (4107 words)

  
 Oxford University Press: Fallen Soldiers: George L. Mosse
Beginning with the Napoleonic wars, Mosse traces the origins of this myth and its symbols, and examines the role of war volunteers in creating and perpetuating it.
But that cataclysm would ultimately shatter the myth, and in exploring the postwar years, Mosse reveals the extent to which the view of death in war, and war in general, was finally changed.
George L. Mosse is Bascom-Weinstein Professor of History, Emeritus, at the University of Wisconsin in Madison, and Koebner Professor of History, Emeritus, at the Hebrew University in Jerusalem.
www.us.oup.com /us/catalog/general/subject/HistoryOther/Military/~~/c2Y9YWxsJnNzPWF1dGhvciZzZD1hc2MmcGY9OTAmdmlldz11c2EmcHI9MTAmYm9va0NvdmVycz1udWxsJmNpPTAxOTUwNzEzOTU=   (609 words)

  
 Lipinsky Institute for Judaic Studies
George realized that many German Jews like himself deeply believed that if they could cultivate the classical and romantic traits and virtues depicted in the great works of German literature and philosophy that they would be accepted as equal citizens by German Gentiles.
Mosse felt that Zionism had absorbed this strain of European Jewish liberalism, but warned that modern Israel could easily be corrupted by the ethnocentrism and militarism engendered by the Arab-Israeli Conflict and the occupation of the West Bank and Gaza.
Mosse’s critical posture did not deter the Hebrew University of Jerusalem from appointing him as the occupant of the Koebner Chair of History.
www-rohan.sdsu.edu /dept/lipinsky/newssp99.htm   (1512 words)

  
 Oxford University Press: The Image of Man: George L. Mosse
What does it mean to be a man? In this book, noted historian George L. Mosse provides the first historical account of the masculine stereotype in modern Western culture, tracing the evolution of the idea of manliness to reveal how it came to embody physical beauty, courage, moral restraint, and a strong will.
Mosse reveals how the new bourgeoisie, faced with a bewildering, rapidly industrialized world, latched onto the knightly ideal of chivalry.
The late George L. Mosse was Bascom-Weinstein Professor of History Emeritus at the University of Wisconsin, Madison, and also Koebner Professor of History Emeritus at the Hebrew University, Jerusalem.
www.oup.com /us/catalog/general/subject/HistoryWorld/Modern/?ci=0195126602&view=usa   (390 words)

  
 Commentary Magazine - Germans and Jews, by George Mosse   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-22)
...Mosse acknowledges this argument, but also emphasizes the attraction that the idea of the Third Force held for Jewish intellectuals, and relates their attitude to the conditions of German culture...
...Mosse also points out, with some alarm, the striking coherence between the v6lkisch Right and the mystical and communitarian ideas of Jewish thinkers like Martin Buber, in whose writings he discerns a tendency to push beyond the bonds of the religious community toward a mystical union with all mankind...
...Mosse defines the goal of the Left intellectuals as the search for a "Third Force"-the "attempt to solve the problems of the modern age by creating a force that could eliminate the unpalatably capitalist and materialist present...
www.commentarymagazine.com /Summaries/V50I4P96-1.htm   (3282 words)

  
 Western Presbyterian Church - Our Worship   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-22)
Indeed, George was the only member of his family to survive the Nazi regime.
In response to this tragedy of unspeakable horrors, Dr. Mosse, the intellectual, devoted himself to understanding the cultural roots of the Holocaust.
George Mosse's goal was to understand human suffering rationally.
www.westernpresbyterian.org /ourworship/archivedsermons/sermon6-10-2001.htm   (2039 words)

  
 A.D. White Professors-at-Large series
George Mosse, Juliet Mitchell and Frank Press are three of Cornell's 16 current professors-at-large, outstanding individuals from the sciences, humanities and arts who, over six-year terms, make periodic visits to Cornell and are considered full members of the faculty.
George Mosse will give a lecture titled "Political Awakenings: Berlin, Exile and the Anti-Fascist Struggle" on Tuesday, Sept. 17.
David Bathrick, a Cornell professor of German studies and chair of the Department of Theatre, Film and Dance, was a colleague of Mosse's for 17 years at the University of Wisconsin.
www.news.cornell.edu /http://www.n/Chronicle/96/9.12.96/profs-at-large.html   (934 words)

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