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Topic: Geosynchronous orbit derivation


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In the News (Tue 25 Nov 14)

  
  Geostationary orbit - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
It is a special case of the geosynchronous orbit (abbreviated GEO), and the one which is of most interest to operators of artificial satellites (including communication and television satellites).
Geosynchronous and geostationary orbits were first popularised by science fiction author Arthur C. Clarke in 1945 as useful orbits for communications satellites.
A geostationary transfer orbit is used to move a satellite from low Earth orbit (LEO) into a geostationary orbit.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Geostationary_orbit   (776 words)

  
 Geosynchronous orbit derivation - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
This is the derivation of the geosynchronous orbital distance for a body in circular orbit around the Earth.
The geosynchronous orbits have the same period as the Earth's rotation.
The rotational period of the Earth is slightly shorter than a day (24 hours), because in one day the Earth does a complete rotation and a little extra due to it also moving round the Sun.
www.sciencedaily.com /encyclopedia/geosynchronous_orbit_derivation   (267 words)

  
 geostationary orbit   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
A geostationary orbit (abbreviated GSO) is a circular orbit in the Earth's equatorial plane, any point on which revolves about the Earth in the same direction and with the same period as the Earth's rotation.
It is a special case of the geosynchronous orbit, and the one which is of most interest to artificial satellite operators.
Geosynchronous orbits and geostationary orbits were first popularised by science fiction author Arthur C. Clarke in 1945 as useful orbits for communications satellites.
www.yourencyclopedia.net /geostationary_orbit.html   (467 words)

  
 Geostationary orbit: Encyclopedia topic   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
A geostationary orbit (abbreviated GEO) is a circular orbit (circular orbit: more facts about this subject) in the Earth (Earth: The 3rd planet from the sun; the planet on which we live) 's equatorial plane (equatorial plane: the equator is an imaginary line drawn around a planet, halfway between the poles....
It is a special case of the geosynchronous orbit (geosynchronous orbit: A circular orbit around the Earth having a period of 24 hours) (abbreviated GSO), and the one which is of most interest to operators of artificial satellite (artificial satellite: Man-made equipment that orbits around the earth or the moon).
Geosynchronous satellite (Geosynchronous satellite: a geosynchronous satellite is a satellite whose orbital speed equals the earths rotational...
www.absoluteastronomy.com /reference/geostationary_orbit   (836 words)

  
 Geosynchronous orbit - Encyclopedia Glossary Meaning Explanation Geosynchronous orbit   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
A geosynchronous orbit is a geocentric orbit that has the same orbital period as the sidereal rotation period of the Earth.
Circular geosynchronous orbits at the equator are known as geostationary orbits.
A further form of geosynchronous orbit is obtained by the theoretical space elevator in which one end of the structure is tethered to the ground, maintaining a longer orbital period than by gravity alone if under tension.
www.encyclopedia-glossary.com /en/Geosynchronous-orbit.html   (708 words)

  
 Reference.com/Encyclopedia/Geostationary orbit   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
It is a special case of the geosynchronous orbit (abbreviated GSO), and the one which is of most interest to operators of artificial satellite.
The idea of a geosynchronous satellite for communication purposes was first published 1928 by Herman Potocnik.
To calculate the geostationary orbit altitude, one finds the point where the magnitudes of the centrifugal acceleration derived from orbital motion and the centripetal acceleration provided by Earth's gravity are equal.
www.reference.com /browse/wiki/Geostationary_orbit   (545 words)

  
 Orbital period: Encyclopedia topic   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
The sidereal period is the time that it takes the object to make one full orbit around the Sun, relative to the star (star: (astronomy) a celestial body of hot gases that radiates energy derived from thermonuclear reactions in the interior) s.
It differs from the sidereal period because the object's line of nodes (line of nodes: the ascending node is one of the orbital nodes, a point in the orbit of an object...
T in years, with a in astronomical unit (astronomical unit: A unit of length used for distances within the solar system; equal to the mean distance between the Earth and the Sun (approximately 93 million miles or 150 million kilometers)) s.
www.absoluteastronomy.com /reference/orbital_period   (1154 words)

  
 Geosynchronous orbit derivation   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
This is the derivation of the geosynchronous orbital distance for a body in orbit around the earth.
The geosynchronous orbits have the period as the Earth's rotation.
ORBIT is a bit more upbeat, but still lyrically challenging and compelling.
www.freeglossary.com /Geosynchronous_orbit_derivation   (618 words)

  
 Final Gallery
A geosynchronous orbit, also called geostationary, is a low circular orbit having a period of twenty-four hours, in which the spacecraft seems to be motionless over the Earth.
A polar orbit is an orbit with an inclination of 90 degrees.
A sun synchronous orbit is a walking orbit whose orbital plane precesses with the same period as the planet's solar orbit period.
aerospacescholars.jsc.nasa.gov /has/Students/finalGall.cfm?id=132   (705 words)

  
 iqexpand.com   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
This is the derivation of the geosynchronous orbital distance for a body in circular...
Geosynchronous orbit derivation This is the derivation of the geosynchronous orbital distance for a body in circular orbit around the Earth.
This is the derivation of the Geosynchronous orbital distance for a body in...
geosynchronous_orbit_derivation.iqexpand.com   (339 words)

  
 Low Earth orbit   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
As an object orbits another, the periapsis is that point at which the two objects are closest to each other and the apoapsis is that point at which they are the farthest from each other.
In the case of an open orbit, the speed at any position of the orbit is at least the escape velocity for that position, in the case of a closed orbit, always less.
The gravity of the orbiting object raises tidal bulges in the primary, and since below the synchronous orbit the orbiting object is moving faster than the body's surface the bulges lag a short angle behind it.
low.earth.orbit.en.reference.pl   (9050 words)

  
 The "Block D" and "Block DM" Rocket Stages
On Block DM missions to geosynchronous orbit the transfer orbit inclination is shifted to 47.5o, close to the value required to minimise the total manoeuvre value to geosynchronous orbit.
Geosynchronous payloads generally enter drift orbits with periods of 1,400-1,480 minutes and are then allowed to drift around the geosynchronous band until they approach their planned longitude: they then perform a small manoeuvre to reach a near-stationary 1,436 minute orbit over the required longitude.
At the first pass through the initial orbit's descending node the Block DM ignited for the first time, placing the assembly in a 51.6o, 190-835 km orbit (this was the first time that the Block DM had ignited on the initial orbit descending node).
www.friends-partners.org /oldfriends/jgreen/blockd.html   (6385 words)

  
 Geosynchronous orbit derivation - TheBestLinks.com - Centripetal force, Earth, Sun, Gravitational constant, ...
Geosynchronous orbit derivation - TheBestLinks.com - Centripetal force, Earth, Sun, Gravitational constant,...
Geosynchronous orbit derivation, Centripetal force, Earth, Sun, Gravitational...
The rotational period of the Earth is slightly shorter than a day (24 hours), because in one day the Earth does a complete revolution and a little extra due to it also moving round the sun.
www.thebestlinks.com /Geosynchronous_orbit_derivation.html   (258 words)

  
 RFC 1305 (rfc1305) - Network Time Protocol (Version 3) Specification, Impl   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
Appendix H contains an analysis of errors, including a derivation of maximum error as a function of delay and dispersion, where the latter quantity depends on the precision of the timekeeping system, frequency tolerance of the local clock and various residuals.
It is suggested that externally derived, unsigned fixed-point quantities such as timestamps be shifted right one bit for internal use, since the precision represented by the full field width is seldom justified.
Local time is derived from the hardware clock of the particular machine and increments at intervals depending on the design used.
www.faqs.org /rfcs/rfc1305.html   (17209 words)

  
 Geostationary orbit - Voyager, the free encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
A geostationary orbit (abbreviated GEO) is a circular orbit directly above the Earth's equator (0º latitude).
It is a special case of the geosynchronous orbit (abbreviated GSO), and the one which is of most interest to operators of artificial satellites (including communication and television satellites).
In geostationary orbit, a satellite is neither plunging towards the earth nor flying away from it.
www.voyager.in /Geostationary_orbit   (799 words)

  
 CalendarHome.com - Orbital period - Calendar Encyclopedia
The draconitic period is the time that elapses between two passages of the object at its ascending node, the point of its orbit where it crosses the ecliptic from the southern to the northern hemisphere.
The above formulæ are easily understood by considering the angular velocities of the Earth and the object: the object's apparent angular velocity is its true (sidereal) angular velocity minus the Earth's, and the synodic period is then simply a full circle divided by that apparent angular velocity.
Note that the orbital period is independent of size: for a scale model it would be the same, when densities are the same (see also Orbit#Scaling in gravity).
encyclopedia.calendarhome.com /Synodic_period.htm   (788 words)

  
 Sir Isaac Newton: The Universal Law of Gravitation
Then, the orbit of the Moon about the Earth could be a consequence of the gravitational force, because the acceleration due to gravity could change the velocity of the Moon in just such a way that it followed an orbit around the earth.
Newton concluded that the orbit of the Moon was of exactly the same nature: the Moon continuously "fell" in its path around the Earth because of the acceleration due to gravity, thus producing its orbit.
In elliptical orbits the speed is faster as the object moves to the closer part of its orbit and then slows as the object proceeds to the farther part of the orbit.
www.pas.rochester.edu /~blackman/ast104/newtongrav.html   (2534 words)

  
 SPACE ENVIRONMENT
Orbits with an inclination very close to 90 (88 ­ 92) are often referred to as being polar.
As the altitude of an orbit increases, the period becomes longer and the satellite's speed is lower.
a sun synchronous orbit is determined by the altitude and the eccentricity of the orbit.
www.fas.org /spp/military/docops/army/ref_text/chap5im.htm   (11175 words)

  
 Geosynchronous orbit derivation - Encyclopedia Glossary Meaning Explanation Geosynchronous orbit derivation   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
Geosynchronous orbit derivation - Encyclopedia Glossary Meaning Explanation Geosynchronous orbit derivation.
Here you will find more informations about Geosynchronous orbit derivation.
The orginal Geosynchronous orbit derivation article can be editet
www.encyclopedia-glossary.com /en/Geosynchronous-orbit-derivation.html   (245 words)

  
 How Do Satellites Work?
Today, the overwhelming majority of satellites in orbit around the earth are positioned at a point 22,238 miles above the earth's equator in geosynchronous earth orbit (GEO), or what is sometimes called Clarke orbit.
This is in honor of Arthur C. Clarke, the man who first suggested in 1945 that satellites in geosynchronous orbits could be used for communications purposes.
The mathematical derivation of the Clarke orbit is a straight-forward calculus problem.
www.atek.org /satellite/work.html   (962 words)

  
 iqexpand.com   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
A geostationary orbit is one that appears to stay above one point on the Earth.
A geostationary orbit is a circular orbit directly above the Earth 's equator (0º latitude).
A direct, circular geosynchronous orbit at an altitude of 35,784 km that lies in the...
geostationary_orbit.iqexpand.com /index.php?title=Antenna_(electronics)&action=edit   (692 words)

  
 Orbital period - Enpsychlopedia
In astrodynamics the orbital period T\, of a small body orbiting a central body in a circular or elliptical orbit is:
In celestial mechanics when both orbiting bodies' masses have to be taken into account the orbital period P\, can be calculated as follows:
a\, is the sum of the semi-major axes of the ellipses in which the centers of the bodies move, or equivalently, the semi-major axis of the ellipse in which one body moves, in the frame of reference with the other body at the origin (which is equal to their constant separation for circular orbits),
www.enpsychlopedia.com /psypsych/Orbital_period   (845 words)

  
 Asean News Network   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
Prior to Samuel Huntington's thesis on clash of civilizations and seemingly substantiated by the Sept. 11 incident, I am of the view that, due to the advances in technology and scientific research, religion will become a dwindling cultural force.
However, rather than agreeing fully with Huntington, I agree more with Karen Armstrong, in one of her seminal works the Battle for God (2000) that the opposite has proven to be true.
The process of certification also includes the audit of forest harvests, primary, secondary processing, manufacturing, distribution and sale (the system of tracking the source of the wood) to ascertain that the timber processed was truly derived from sustainable, properly managed forests.
aseannewsnetwork.com /articles/content/g/ge/geostationary_orbit.html   (4600 words)

  
 The Space Review: Heavy lifting for the new millennium
The Delta was derived from the Thor intermediate range ballistic missile (IRBM), built by the Douglas Aircraft Company in response to the launch of Sputnik I in 1957.
This derivation was not successful however, with only one out of three launches successful.
The third derivation of the Delta 4 includes a five-meter diameter second stage with larger fuel tanks and two SRMs on the CBC; the fourth derivation differs by having four SRMs strapped to the CBC.
www.thespacereview.com /article/135/1   (1924 words)

  
 AAG Remote Sensing Specialty Group
ERS-1 was conceived as an orbiting SAR platform that would be capable of measuring, on a global scale, the Earth's atmospheric and surface properties with a high degree of accuracy.
They circle the Earth in a geosynchronous orbit, which means they orbit the equatorial plane of the Earth at a speed matching the Earth's rotation.
SLAR is an electronic image-producing system that derives its name from the radar beam transmission being perpendicular to the path of the aircraft during data acquisition.
www.aagrssg.org /systems.html   (4982 words)

  
 Geostationary Orbit Encyclopedia Article, Information, History and Biography @ LaunchBase.net   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
Geostationary Orbit Encyclopedia Article, Information, History and Biography @ LaunchBase.net
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www.launchbase.net /encyclopedia/Geostationary_orbit   (875 words)

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