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Topic: Gerald Edelman


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In the News (Thu 18 Jul 19)

  
  Edelman, Gerald M. - MSN Encarta
Edelman received his Ph.D. degree in biochemistry and immunology from Rockefeller University in 1960 and remained there as a faculty member.
Edelman is a member of the U.S. National Academy of Sciences and a foreign member of the Academy of Sciences of the Institute of France.
In 1961 Edelman suggested that Immunoglobulin G (IgG) was made up of two amino acid chains, one light and one heavy.
encarta.msn.com /encyclopedia_761582633/Edelman_Gerald_M.html   (397 words)

  
 "Edelman Review"
Edelman came along it was widely believed that there was a single kind of lymphocyte whose all-purpose antibody molecules had the chameleon-like ability to mold themselves to invading antigens.
Edelman's theory is that, as he sees it, no information actually passes from the environment to the brain, any more than information from the environment can be said to pass directly into an animal's genome; the environment simply selects from a random population those creatures best suited to survive.
Edelman insists that it is wrong to believe that "individual neurons carry information, just as some electronic devices carry information." Yet when he describes the brain he uses words that imply that the brain is something like a computer.
www.santafe.edu /~johnson/reviews.edelman.html   (2118 words)

  
  Gerald Edelman - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Edelman expounds a biological theory of consciousness, which he explicitly locates within Darwin's Theory of Natural Selection and Darwinian theories of population dynamics.
Edelman argues that the mind and consciousness are wholly material and purely biological phenomena, occurring as highly complex cellular processes within the brain, and that the development of consciousness and intelligence can be satisfactorally explained by Darwinian theory.
Gerald Edelman is the founder and director of The Neurosciences Institute, a nonprofit research centre in San Diego that studies the biological basis of higher brain function in humans.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Gerald_Edelman   (443 words)

  
 Untitled Document   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-31)
GERALD M. Gerald M. Edelman, M.D., Ph.D., Nobel Laureate in Physiology or Medicine in 1972, is President of Neuroscience Research Foundation and Director of the Neuroscience Institute, as well as the Chairman of the Department of Neurobiology at The Scripps Research Institute.
Edelman's early studies of the structure and diversity of antibodies led to his Nobel award; he then began research into the mechanisms involved in the regulation of primary cellular processes, particularly the control of cell growth and the development of multicellular organisms.
Edelman is a member of the National Academy of Sciences, the American Philosophical Society, and the Institute de France.
www.loc.gov /bicentennial/bios/frontiers/bios_edelman.html   (238 words)

  
 Edelman, Gerald Maurice   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-31)
Working at Rockefeller, Edelman and his research team succeeded (1969) in constructing a precise model of an entire antibody molecule, which was found to be a four-chain structure consisting of more than 1,300 amino acids.
Edelman and his team were then able to identify the precise locations on the molecule where antigenic binding occurs.
Edelman's theory of a human brain that modifies itself continually in response to incoming signals acquired increasing influence among neuroscientists by the end of the 20th century.
www.cartage.org.lb /en/themes/Biographies/MainBiographies/E/Edelman/1.html   (293 words)

  
 Gerald Edelman   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-31)
Gerald Maurice Edelman (born July 1, 1929) is a biologist who won the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine in 1972 for his work on the immune system.
Edelman has asked whether we should attempt to construct models of functioning minds or models of brains which, through interactions with their surroundings, can develop minds?
Edelman's answer is that we should make model brains and pay attention to how they interact with their environment.
www.bidprobe.com /en/wikipedia/g/ge/gerald_edelman.html   (266 words)

  
 Gerald Maurice Edelman
Edelman argues that the mind and consciousness are wholly material and purely biological phenomena, occurring as highly complex cellular processes within the brain, and that the development of consciousness and intelligence can be satisfactorally explained by Darwinian theory.
Gerald Edelman is the founder and director of The Neurosciences Institute, a nonprofit research centre in San Diego that studies the biological basis of higher brain function in humans.
Edelman's point of departure was the assumption that the antibody like most biologically active proteins might be composed of a number of chain structures, held together by cross-links of some kind, most probably sulfur bonds.
www.jewishvirtuallibrary.org /jsource/biography/edelman.html   (1070 words)

  
 Review: Second Nature by Gerald Edelman | By genre | Guardian Unlimited Books
Gerald Edelman, Nobelist and immunologist turned brain scientist, is among the most prolific and distinguished of this group, his books on the theme stretching back some two decades.
Second Nature is Edelman's latest attempt at relating this restricted definition to the wider concerns of social scientists and the humanities, basing his effort on what he describes as a "brain-based epistemology", which he sees as helping heal the rift between these cultures as they have developed historically in the west.
Edelman repeatedly reminds us of the importance of this uniqueness (indeed, there is an uncomfortable degree of repetition in the book that suggests he has been less than well served by his editor).
books.guardian.co.uk /reviews/scienceandnature/0,,2014777,00.html   (1152 words)

  
 Gerald Edelman Summary
Gerald M. Edelman and his associate Rodney Porter received the 1972 Nobel Prize in physiology or medicine for their discoveries concerning the chemical structure of antibodies.
Edelman argues that the mind and consciousness are wholly material and purely biological phenomena, occurring as highly complex cellular processes within the brain, and that the development of consciousness and intelligence can be satisfactorily explained by Darwinian theory.
Gerald Edelman is the founder and director of The Neurosciences Institute, a nonprofit research centre in San Diego that studies the biological basis of higher brain function in humans, and is a professor of neurobiology at The Scripps Research Institute.
www.bookrags.com /Gerald_Edelman   (4820 words)

  
 HCII 2005: General Information   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-31)
Dr. Edelman is Director of The Neurosciences Institute and President of Neurosciences Research Foundation, the publicly supported not-for-profit organization that is the Institute's parent.
Dr. Edelman has formulated a detailed theory to explain the development and organization of higher brain functions in terms of a process known as neuronal group selection.
Edelman's continuing work in theoretical neuroscience includes designing new kinds of machines, called recognition automata, that are capable of carrying out tests of the self-consistency of the theory of neuronal group selection and promise to shed new light on the fundamental workings of the human brain.
www.hci-international.org /general/keynote/gme.asp   (764 words)

  
 Gerald Edelman   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-31)
Edelman proposes a biological theory of consciousness, which he explicitly considers to be an integral part of Darwin's Theory of Natural Selection and theories of population dynamics.
Edelman argues that mind and consciousness are wholly material and purely biological phenomena which occur as highly complex cellular processes within the brain.
Edelman believes that selfhood and subjectivity, two of the defining features of consciousness, result naturally from the ideas just outlined: selfhood is a consequence of the grounding of all our later experiences in early perceptions of the internal environment; subjectivity results from the unique developmental trajectory of each and every human mind.
members.tripod.com /xtro1666/gerald_edelman.htm   (1786 words)

  
 Gerald Edelman -- Facts, Info, and Encyclopedia article   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-31)
Edelman expounds a (Click link for more info and facts about biological) biological theory of consciousness, which he explicitly locates within (Provincial capital of the Northern Territory of Australia) Darwin's Theory of (A natural process resulting in the evolution of organisms best adapted to the environment) Natural Selection and Darwinian theories of population dynamics.
He rejects (The doctrine that reality consists of two basic opposing elements, often taken to be mind and matter (or mind and body), or good and evil) dualism and also dismisses newer hypotheses such as the so-called 'computational' model of consciousness, which liken the brain's functions to the operations of a computer.
Gerald Edelman is the founder and director of The (Click link for more info and facts about Neurosciences Institute) Neurosciences Institute, a nonprofit research centre that studies the biological basis of higher brain function in humans.
www.absoluteastronomy.com /encyclopedia/G/Ge/Gerald_Edelman.htm   (476 words)

  
 Gerald M. Edelman - Biography
Edelman is a member of the National Academy of Sciences, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the American Society of Biological Chemists and the American Association of Immunologists, as well as a number of other scientific societies.
Edelman is Director of The Neurosciences Institute and President of Neurosciences Research Foundation, the publicly supported not-for-profit organization that is the Institute's parent.
Edelman's continuing work in theoretical neuroscience includes designing new kinds of machines, called recognition automata, that are capable of carrying out tests of the self-consistency of the theory of neuronal group selection and promise to shed new light on the fundamental workings of the human brain.
nobelprize.org /nobel_prizes/medicine/laureates/1972/edelman-bio.html   (1125 words)

  
 William H. Calvin, book review of NEURAL DARWINISM in Science 1988
Since Edelman's models seem particularly relevant to the postnatal tuning-up process, it is even more surprising that this conceptually important background, from research on both humans and monkeys (for example, Science 232, 232 [1986]), is omitted.
More impressively, Edelman and co-workers Leif Finkel and John Pearson can mimic the cortical rearrangements that occur when a finger is amputated (or overstimulated), though I note a revealing exception.
If one looks carefully, Edelman's more general theory usually encompasses both the Darwinian two-step and this type of group-qua-group selection--but both tend to be missing from the examples on which biologists will likely focus their attention.
williamcalvin.com /1980s/1988Science.htm   (940 words)

  
 Wider than the Sky: The Phenomenal Gift of Consciousness   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-31)
Although it should be noted that Edelman perhaps made the wrong decision by relying on the glossary instead of including explanatory foot- or endnotes.
Edelman's prose style is murky and redundant (most readers will make heavy use of that glossary).
Sadly, the most engaging parts of the text are 100-year old quotes from William James, whose descriptions Edelman acknowledges as a "high-water mark in the field." Much of the text reads, unfortunately, like a specialized research paper that has had one quick pass by an editor to try to make it more approachable.
www.jemsfurniture.com /BookStore/isbn0300102291.html   (981 words)

  
 Review of Varela et al. & Edelman
Edelman, on the other hand, bases his attacks on superficial, out-of-date caricatures, so he ends up unwittingly reinventing the wheels that cognitive scientists have been carefully considering, improving, and replacing for years.
Since the psychological competences of Edelman's simulations are substantially more rudimentary than the psychological competences exhibited by other models that also make fundamental use of intracerebral evolutionary mechanisms, it would have been useful for him to explain why he thinks that his model, though simpler, probes deeper.
Edelman ends his book with a "Critical Postscript" devoted to "bashing" (as he says) the doctrines he takes to be central to cognitive science.
ase.tufts.edu /cogstud/papers/edelman.htm   (961 words)

  
 Bright Air, Brilliant Fire: On the Matter of the Mind (Gerald M. Edelman)   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-31)
On the contrary, Edelman explains clearly that the mind is a process that operates in a 4 dimensional world; that it doesn't have a perfect memory or doesn't order events or objects logically.
I am a huge fan of Edelman, but I regretted having bought this book; I would say this is a kind of half-successful attempt at vulgarizing what he explained so well elsewhere: there is nothing to be found here that wasn`t already explained in more detail in "Neural Darwinism" and "The Remembered Present".
Edelman takes off on this theme and proceeds to deliver the underlying neural blueprints for ego, soul, cognition, and a host of other mystical magical metaphysics, minus the meta.
www.interference.com /webstore/us/product/0465007643.htm   (578 words)

  
 Gerald Edelman   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-31)
Gerald Maurice Edelman (llevado de julio el 1 de 1929) es un biólogo que ganó el premio Nobel en fisiología o remedio en 1972 para su trabajo sobre el sistema inmune.
Edelman expone una teoría biológica del sentido, que él localiza explícitamente dentro de la teoría de Darwin de la selección natural y de teorías darwinian de las dinámicas de la población.
Edelman discute que la mente y el sentido sean enteramente material y fenómenos puramente biológicos, ocurriendo como procesos celulares altamente complejos dentro del cerebro, y que el revelado del sentido y de la inteligencia se puede satisfactorally explicar por la teoría de Darwinian.
www.yotor.net /wiki/es/ge/Gerald%20Edelman.htm   (429 words)

  
 san diego magazine archives
Gerald M. Edelman, M.D., Ph.D., Nobel laureate, intellectual iconoclast and admirer of Jascha Heifitz, Albert Einstein and Yogi Berra, is explaining the difference between scientists and other people.
Following a stint at the prestigious Massachusetts General Hospital, Edelman was drafted as a doctor and stationed in France, where he found a passion for driving racecars.
Edelman, who trained as a classical violinist and still counts the great violinist Jascha Heifitz among his heroes, is a workaholic.
www.sandiegomagazine.com /issues/december00/weird.shtml   (790 words)

  
 Amazon.com: Wider than the Sky: The Phenomenal Gift of Consciousness: Books: Gerald Edelman   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-31)
Edelman, who won the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine in 1972 for his studies on the structure and diversity of antibodies (which established that the immune system works according to Darwinian principles), once again applies the theory of natural selection to his own theory of neuronal group selection, which he first proposed in 1978.
Edelman thinks that computer or machine models of consciousness will not work and that much of cognitive psychology is ill founded, since there are no functional states that can be uniquely equated with defined or coded computational states in individual brains and no processes that can be equated with the execution of algorithms.
Edelman takes some other interesting positions, but fails to alert the reader as to their speculative and controversial nature (I mean, isn't that what footnotes are for?).
www.amazon.com /Wider-than-Sky-Phenomenal-Consciousness/dp/0300102291   (3448 words)

  
 Powell's Books - Wider Than the Sky: The Phenomenal Gift of Consciousness by Gerald M. Edelman
Edelman explores the relation of consciousness to causation, to evolution, to the development of the self, and to the origins of feelings, learning, and memory.
Edelman has been a driving force in bringing an increasing sophistication to our models of the biological foundations of consciousness.
Gerald M. Edelman, M.D., is director of the Neurosciences Institute and president of Neurosciences Research Foundation.
www.powells.com /cgi-bin/partner?partner_id=719&cgi=product&isbn=0300102291   (647 words)

  
 Gerald Edelman
Edelman si è successivamente occupato dei meccanismi di regolazione della crescita cellulare e dello sviluppo degli organismi multicellulari.
Questo processo, secondo Edelman, è totalmente a posteriori e si contrappone alla vecchia concezione istruttiva che considerava l'anticorpo capace di prelevare informazioni dall'antigene e di riprodursi di conseguenza.
Per giungere a una teoria globale della coscienza, la Teoria della Selezione dei Gruppi Neuronali (TSGN), Edelman trasferisce i concetti elaborati durante i suoi studi del sistema immunitario a quello dello sviluppo del cervello, nel tentativo di costruire un modello dettagliato delle strutture e dei processi che sono alla base delle nostre facoltà cognitive.
www.riflessioni.it /enciclopedia/edelman.htm   (897 words)

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