Factbites
 Where results make sense
About us   |   Why use us?   |   Reviews   |   PR   |   Contact us  

Topic: Germanic Neopaganism


In the News (Sat 23 Aug 14)

  
  Neopaganism Encyclopedia Article @ MyFriendGod.com (My Friend God)   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-05)
Neopaganism proper begins only with 18th century Romanticism, and the surge of interest in Germanic paganism with the Viking revival in the British Isles and Scandinavia.
The term "Neopagan" is used by academics and adherents alike to denote those Pagan traditions which are largely modern in origin, or which are conceived as reconstructions of ancient practices.
Some critics claim that Neopagans cannot legitimately be considered practitioners of any "true" Pagan religion, citing that in the history of ideas it is understood that revivals are not identical to their models: e.g., Roman sculpture compared to the neoclassicism of, for example, Antonio Canova.
www.myfriendgod.com /encyclopedia/Neopaganism   (4899 words)

  
 Neopaganism   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-05)
Most Neopagan traditions are polytheistic, but the interpretation of the concept of deity varies widely, including monist, pantheist, dualist, deist, animist, henotheist, psychological and mystical variations and interpretations.
The term "Neopagan" is used by academics and adherents alike to denote those Pagan traditions which are largely modern in origin, or which are conceived as reconstructions of ancient practices.
Some critics claim that Neopagans cannot legitimately be considered practitioners of any "true" Pagan religion, citing that in the history of ideas it is understood that revivals are not identical to their models: e.g., Roman sculpture compared to the neoclassicism of, for example, Antonio Canova.
en.encyclopediahome.com /wiki/Neopaganism   (4743 words)

  
 Paganism Encyclopedia Article @ AmericanCanDo.com (American Can Do)   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-05)
Originating with the Jastorf culture, the Germanic tribes were distributed over Eastern and Central Europe by the 5th century, and their dialects ceased to be mutually intelligible from around that time.
Christianization of the Germanic peoples took place from the 4th (Goths) to the 6th (Anglo-Saxons, Alamanni) or 8th (Saxons) centuries on the continent, and from the 9th to 12th centuries in Iceland and Scandinavia.
Also categorised as Neopagan are religions such as Forn Sed, Neo-druidism, Longobardic Odinism, Lithuanian Romuva, and Slavic Rodoverie that also claim to revive an ancient religion rather than reconstruct it, though in general the difference is not absolutely fixed.
www.americancando.com /encyclopedia/Paganism   (2877 words)

  
 Odin - Encyclopedia, History, Geography and Biography
According to the Prose Edda, Odin, the first and most powerful of the Aesir, was a son of Bestla and Borr and brother of Ve and Vili and together with these brothers he cast down the frost giant Ymir and created the world from Ymir's body.
It is still likely that early Germanic Christians connected the two myths, moulding their image of Christ after Odin and vice versa, an effect that is also suggested by the Anglo-Saxon Dream of the Rood which portrays Christ as a Germanic warrior-king.
Odin, under the German form of his name, Wotan (pronounced ['vo:ta:n]) is one of the main protagonists of Richard Wagner's opera cycle, Der Ring des Nibelungen.
www.arikah.net /encyclopedia/Odin   (3151 words)

  
 Neopaganism - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-05)
In the USA, Wicca is the largest Neopagan movement, and while itself heterogeneous, many adherents share a body of common precepts, including a reverence for nature or active ecology, Goddess and/or Horned God veneration, use of ancient mythologies, the belief in magick, and often the belief in reincarnation.
Neopaganism proper begins only with 18th century Romanticism, and the surge of interest in Germanic paganism with the Viking revival in Britain and Scandinavia.
Neopagan duo-theistic philosophies tend to emphasise the God and Goddess' (or Lord and Lady's) genders as being analogous of a concept similar to that of the oriental yin and yang; ie, two complementary opposites.
88.208.194.172 /wiki/index.php/Neopaganism   (4496 words)

  
 germanic_neopaganism   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-05)
The total number of Neopagans worldwide is estimated at roughly one million [12] [13], of which about a third each are located in the UK, the USA, and over the rest of the world.
Germanic Neopagan organizations generally favor democratic and republican forms of church government, as inspired by the parliamentary Thing of the Viking era and subsequent parliamentary systems of Britain and the Scandinavian countries.
Germanic Neopaganism is primarily bound together by common symbological and social concepts.Personal character and virtue is emphasized: truthfulness, self-reliance, and hospitality are important moral distinctions, underpinning an especially cherished notion of honour.
www.traveltropicalbeaches.com /wiki/?title=Germanic_neopaganism   (3294 words)

  
 Neopaganism - Gnorx.com, the free encyclopedia
Other Neopagans stress their connections with older forms of Paganism in terms of an alleged "underground" continuity, but such claims are largely discredited.
Germanic paganism with the Viking revival in Britain and Scandinavia.
Some claims of continuity between Neopaganism and older forms of Paganism have been shown to be spurious, or outright forgery, as in the case of Iolo Morganwg's Druid's Prayer.
www.gnorx.com /Neopaganism   (4230 words)

  
 New age / stonehenge / neo-pagan
Neopaganism or Neo-Paganism is any of a heterogeneous group of new religious movements, particularly those influenced by ancient, primarily pre-Christian and sometimes pre-Judaic religions.
Most Neopagan traditions are polytheistic, but the interpretation of the concept of deity varies widely, including pantheist, dualist, deist, animist, henotheist, psychological and mystical variations and interpretations.
They are not disheartened when the evidence suggests that their beliefs have been founded on a misreading of history or upon fakelore, and instead contend that any goddess who is worshipped is 'real', whether she previously existed in history or not.
www.new-age-guide.com /new_age/neo-pagan.htm   (4863 words)

  
 New age / neo-paganism / forn sed
The term Germanic Heathenry (Old Norse heiðinn), is commonly used by adherents as a self-descriptor, while in the USA, the terms Ásatrú ("Æsir faith"), and Odinism are also widely used.
Several early members of the Nazi Party were part of the Thule Society, a study group for German antiquity.The connections of this movement to historical Germanic paganism are tenuous at best, with its emphasis lying on the esoteric as taught by the likes of Julius Evola, Guido von List or Karl Maria Willigut.
The total number of Neopagans worldwide is estimated at roughly one million, of which about a third each are located in the UK, the USA, and over the rest of the world.
www.new-age-guide.com /new_age/forn_sed.htm   (3077 words)

  
 Norse mythology
Germanic mythology, in its turn, had evolved from an earlier Indo-European mythology.
This priestly role of the king was in line with the general role of godi, who was the head of a kindred group of families (for this social structure, see norse clans), and who administered the sacrifices.
A unique eye-witness account of Germanic human sacrifice survives in Ibn Fadlan's account of a Rus ship burial, where a slave-girl had volunteered to accompany her lord to the next world.
www.hotspotsz.com /wiki.php?title=Norse_mythology   (3936 words)

  
 Neopaganism - The Mind-N-Magick Paganpedia
Neopaganism (sometimes Neo-Paganism) describes a heterogeneous group of new religious movements, particularly those influenced by ancient, mainly pre-Christian and sometimes pre-Judaic religions.
The 1960s and 1970s saw the rise of Germanic Neopaganism, Ásatrú in Iceland and Odinism in the USA, in parts somewhat influenced by Nazi mysticism.
They are not disheartened when the evidence suggests that their beliefs have been founded on a misreading of history or upon fakelore, and instead contend that any goddess who is worshipped is 'real', whether she previously existed in history or not [4].
paganpedia.mind-n-magick.com /wiki/index.php?title=Neopaganism   (5199 words)

  
 OM SYMBOL
The runes were introduced to, or invented by, the Germanic peoples in the 1st or 2nd century (The oldest known runic inscription dates to ca.
While at this time the Germanic language was certainly not at the Proto-Germanic stage any longer, it may still have been a continuum of dialects not yet clearly separated into the three branches of later centuries, viz.
The runes are a major element in Germanic neopaganism, often used to indicate ancestry, aesthetically in crafts and for ritual purposes.
www.mrsspokane.com /Runes.htm   (1108 words)

  
 Neopaganism - Enpsychlopedia
Neopaganism or Neo-Paganism[1] is any of a heterogeneous group of new religious movements, particularly those influenced by ancient, primarily pre-Christian and sometimes pre-Judaic religions.
The mythologies of the ancient civilizations are not generally considered to be literally factual by Neopagans, in the sense that the Bible and other Abrahamic texts are commonly understood.
They are not disheartened when the evidence suggests that their beliefs have been founded on a misreading of history or upon fakelore, and instead contend that any goddess who is worshipped is 'real', whether she previously existed in history or not [6].
enpsychlopedia.org /psypsych/Neo-paganism   (4803 words)

  
 Persecution of Heathens
While the early Christianization of the various Germanic peoples was achieved by various means, and was partly facilitated by the prestige of the Christian Roman Empire amongst European pagans.
The rise of Germanic Christianity was, thus, mainly due to voluntary conversion, from the 8th century on the Continent mainly pursued by the Anglo-Saxon mission.
After a letter campaign pointing out that some of these symbols are also used in contexts unrelated to Neo-Nazism by Germanic Neopagans, the ADL included a disclaimer on their site to that effect.
forums.canadiancontent.net /off-topic/44908-persecution-heathens.html   (748 words)

  
 Paganism
The term is used for Germanic paganism, or Germanic Neopaganism.
Although Neopagans often refer to themselves simply as "Pagan", for purposes of clarity this article will focus on the ancient religion, while Neopaganism is discussed in its own article.
Still, some practitioners even of syncretized directions tend to object to the term "Neopaganism" for their religion as they consider what they are doing not to be a new thing.
www.ufaqs.com /wiki/en/pa/Paganism.htm   (1602 words)

  
 Norse mythology - Enpsychlopedia
It is the best-preserved version of the older common Germanic mythology, which also includes the closely related Anglo-Saxon mythology.
The Blót, the form of worship practiced by the ancient Germanic and Scandinavian people resembled that of the Celts and Balts : it could occur in sacred groves.
There are also possibilites that the names of several days had other germanic origins, but these were lost due to corruption of speech or these names being mistaken for cognates in latin.
www.enpsychlopedia.com /psypsych/Norse_mythology   (4158 words)

  
 Asatru (Norse/Germanic Paganism) - ReligionFacts
The ancient form of the religion is usually referred to as Germanic paganism, Germanic religion, or Norse mythology.
The ancient origins of Germanic religion date from prehistoric times and are thus unknown.
In the old Germanic religion, the central practice was animal and human sacrifice, conducted in the open or in groves and forests.
www.religionfacts.com /a-z-religion-index/asatru.htm   (1661 words)

  
 Germanic Neopaganism - The Mind-N-Magick Paganpedia
Later in the 1960s, various Neopagan groups emerged, who based their beliefs on the pre-Christian Germanic faiths.
The terms Ásatrú ("Æsir faith"), Odinism, Forn Sed ("Old custom", Anglo-Saxon fyrnsidu), Heathenry (from the Old Norse heiðinn), Germanic Heathenry, Theodism and other terms are used as descriptors for those who adhere to the belief system encompassed by the term Germanic neopaganism.
Small communities are also found in many other countries, mostly in Western Europe (Austria, Switzerland, the Netherlands, Belgium, France, Italy, Portugal) and Russia.
paganpedia.mind-n-magick.com /wiki/index.php?title=Germanic_Neopaganism   (3450 words)

  
 Germanic Neopaganism - WiccanWeb.ca   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-05)
Polytheistic Reconstructions of the Germanic pagan traditions began in the 19th century Romantic movement.
Since the Anglo-Saxon society was based on sacral kingship, American Theodist Neopagans saw it necessary to elect an Aetheling; this position, king of Vinland Rice has been occupied by one Garman since 1995 [5].
In the US, this widely misunderstood term is used to describe the practices of a minority of Neopagans; in particular, Diana Paxson and her group Hrafnar, who practice what they call oracle seid".
www.wiccanweb.ca /wiki/index.php/Germanic_Neopaganism   (3379 words)

  
 Ásatrú   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-05)
While the term Ásatrú originally referred specifically to the Icelandic adherents of the religion, Germanic neopagan and reconstructionist groups widely identify themselves as Ásatrú, particularly in the USA.
In this wider sense, the term Ásatrú is used synonymously with Germanic neopaganism or Germanic paganism, along with the terms Forn Sed, Odinism
The use of the term Ásatrú for Germanic paganism preceding 19th century revivalist movements is therefore an anachronism.
www.danceage.com /biography/sdmc_Asatru   (1239 words)

  
 Yule - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-05)
In Germanic Neopaganism it is one of the eight solar holidays, or sabbats, where Yule is celebrated on the winter solstice: in the northern hemisphere, circa December 21, and in the southern hemisphere, circa June 21.
Many of the symbols associated with the modern holiday of Christmas such as the burning of the Yule log, the eating of ham, the hanging of boughs, holly, mistletoe, etc. are apparently derived from traditional northern European Yule celebrations.
When the first missionaries began converting the Germanic peoples to Christianity, they found it easier to simply provide a Christian reinterpretation for popular feasts such as Yule and allow the celebrations themselves to go on largely unchanged, rather than trying to suppress them.
enc.qba73.com /link-Yule   (1470 words)

  
 Informat.io on Runic Alphabet   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-05)
The "West Germanic hypothesis" speculates on an introduction by West Germanic tribes.
However, Scandinavian scholars interprete these inscriptions as Proto-Norse, but it should be noted that the differences between Proto-Norse and other Germanic dialects were still minute and that the classification is mostly based on location rather than forms.
The fascination that runes seem to have exerted on the Nazis can be traced to the occult and völkisch author Guido von List, one of the important figures in Germanic mysticism and runic revivalism in the late 19th and early 20th century.
www.vacilando.net /index.php?title=Runic_alphabet   (3429 words)

  
 Odin - The real meaning from Timesharetalk wikipedia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-05)
A likely context of the diffusion of elements of Celtic ritual into Germanic culture is that of the Chatti, who lived at the Celtic-Germanic boundary in Hesse during the final centuries before the Common Era.
Recently, the German NPD issued T-Shirts labeled Odin statt Jesus ("Odin instead of Jesus") that are popular mostly in the Heavy Metal music scene
For example, in Phillip Reeve's Hungry City Chronicles, Odin is an orbital weapon capable of delivering highly destructive energy blasts to any point on the globe.
www.timesharetalk.co.uk /wiki.asp?k=Odin   (3277 words)

Try your search on: Qwika (all wikis)

Factbites
  About us   |   Why use us?   |   Reviews   |   Press   |   Contact us  
Copyright © 2005-2007 www.factbites.com Usage implies agreement with terms.