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Topic: Germanic languages


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In the News (Sun 19 Nov 17)

  
  Verbix -- Germanic. Conjugate verbs in 50+ languages
Germanic languages are spoken by more than 480 million people in northern and western Europe, North America, South Africa, and Australia.
North Germanic or Scandinavian: western group - the Icelandic language, the Norwegian language, and Faroese; eastern group - the Danish language and the Swedish language.
West Germanic: Anglo-Frisian group - the English language and the Frisian language; Netherlandic-German group - Netherlandic, or Dutch-Flemish and the Low German dialects, Afrikaans, the German language or High German, and the Yiddish language.
www.verbix.com /languages/germanic.asp   (113 words)

  
  Teutonic (Germanic) Languages - LoveToKnow 1911
languages seem originally to have had three numbers and eight cases, though it is by no means clear that each of the latter had a distinct form in every class of stems.
They are doubtless to be regarded as the representatives of the old language of the maritime districts, and it is probable that languages of this type were at one time spoken along the whole of the coast between the present frontiers of Belgium and Denmark.
The early divergence of the eastern languages in general from those of the north and west is perhaps to be ascribed in part to the great extension southwards of the territories of the eastern tribes in the 3rd and 4th centuries.
www.1911encyclopedia.org /Teutonic_(Germanic)_Languages   (4502 words)

  
  Germanic languages - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The Germanic languages are a group of related languages constituting a branch of the Indo-European (IE) language family.
The common ancestor of all languages comprising this branch is Proto-Germanic, spoken in approximately the latter mid-1st millennium BC in Iron Age Northern Europe.
All Germanic languages are thought to be descended from a hypothetical Proto-Germanic, united by their having been subjected to the sound shifts of Grimm's law and Verner's law.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Germanic_languages   (1709 words)

  
 Germanic Languages
Gutnish is a contemporary Eastern North Germanic language spoken on the island of Gotland.
It is the official language of Sweden and is one of the official languages of Finland.
West Norse is the western branch of the North Germanic languages used in Iceland, Ireland, Norway, the Hebrides, Orkney, Shetland, and the Faroe Islands.
softrat.home.mindspring.com /germanic.html   (3010 words)

  
 Germanic languages — FactMonster.com
Germanic languages, subfamily of the Indo-European family of languages, spoken by about 470 million people in many parts of the world, but chiefly in Europe and the Western Hemisphere.
German language - German language German language, member of the West Germanic group of the Germanic subfamily of the...
Germanic languages: Common Characteristics - Common Characteristics Strong evidence for the unity of all the modern Germanic languages can be...
www.factmonster.com /ce6/society/A0820622.html   (154 words)

  
 Reference.com/Encyclopedia/Germanic languages
The common ancestor of all languages comprising this branch is Proto-Germanic, spoken in approximately the latter mid-1st millennium BC in Iron Age Northern Europe.
All Germanic languages are thought to be descended from a hypothetical Proto-Germanic, united by their having been subjected to the sound shifts of Grimm's law and Verner's law.
During the early Middle Ages, the West Germanic languages were separated by the insular development of Middle English on one hand, and by the High German consonant shift on the continent on the other, resulting in Upper German and Low Saxon, with graded intermediate Central German varieties.
www.reference.com /browse/wiki/Germanic_languages   (1745 words)

  
 Germanic languages   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Strong evidence for the unity of all the modern Germanic languages can be found in the phenomenon known as the first Germanic sound shift or consonant shift (also called Grimm’s law), which set the Germanic subfamily apart from the other members of the Indo-European family.
Also peculiar to the Germanic languages is the recessive accent, whereby the stress usually falls on the first or root syllable of a word, especially a word of Germanic origin.
Lastly, vocabulary furnished evidence of a common origin for the Germanic languages in that a number of the basic words in these languages are similar in form; however, while word similarity may indicate the same original source for a group of languages, it can also be a sign of borrowing.
www.orbilat.com /Encyclopaedia/G/Germanic_Languages.html   (805 words)

  
 Germanic languages - HighBeam Encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Strong evidence for the unity of all the modern Germanic languages can be found in the phenomenon known as the first Germanic sound shift or consonant shift (also called Grimm's law), which set the Germanic subfamily apart from the other members of the Indo-European family.
Also peculiar to the Germanic languages is the recessive accent, whereby the stress usually falls on the first or root syllable of a word, especially a word of Germanic origin.
Lastly, vocabulary furnished evidence of a common origin for the Germanic languages in that a number of the basic words in these languages are similar in form; however, while word similarity may indicate the same original source for a group of languages, it can also be a sign of borrowing.
www.encyclopedia.com /doc/1E1-germancl1an.html   (959 words)

  
 West Germanic languages - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The West Germanic languages constitute the largest branch of the Germanic family of languages and includes languages such as German, English and Dutch.
During the Middle Ages, the West Germanic languages were separated by the insular development of Middle English on one hand, and by the second Germanic sound shift on the continent on the other.
The linguistic contact of the Viking settlers of the Danelaw with the Anglo-Saxons left traces in the English language, and is suspected to have facilitated the collapse of the Old English inflexional system that marked the onset of the Middle English period 12th century.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/West_Germanic_languages   (609 words)

  
 2006-2007 Program Requirements - Germanic Languages
The choice of language and the means of fulfillment of the requirement must be agreed upon in advance by the student and the Director.
Eligible courses in Germanic linguistics might be in the area of history and structure of the language, or theory.
Students are examined in the following areas: one examination on the history of Germanic languages, theory, and historical linguistics; one examination on the structure of German languages, and in theory and synchronic linguistics; one examination on languages and dialects.
www.gdnet.ucla.edu /gasaa/pgmrq/german.asp   (2846 words)

  
 Highbeam Encyclopedia - Search Results for Germanic languages   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Germanic languages GERMANIC LANGUAGES [Germanic languages] subfamily of the Indo-European family of languages, spoken by about 470 million people in many parts of the world, but chiefly in Europe and the Western Hemisphere.
German language GERMAN LANGUAGE [German language] member of the West Germanic group of the Germanic subfamily of the Indo-European family of languages (see Germanic languages).
It is the official language of Germany and Austria and is one of the official languages of Switzerland.
www.encyclopedia.com /articlesnew/05029.html   (647 words)

  
 Germanic Branch of the Indo-European Family
Germanic languages are spoken by close to 470 million people in many parts of the world, but mainly in Europe and the Western Hemisphere.
An official language is a language that is given a privileged legal status in a state, or other legally-defined political entity.
All Germanic languages are characterized by a shift of stress to the root and later to the first syllable of the word.
www.nvtc.gov /lotw/months/december/GermanicBranch.html   (1160 words)

  
 Germanic Languages
So both modern German and modern English descend from a primitive West Germanic language family, but they are on different sides of the family.
In Gothic (the earliest attested Germanic language, but not the source of the others, just a member of the Eastern branch of the family), the first and second person personal pronouns are (nominative) ik, þu, weis and jus; (accusative) mik, þuk, uns and izwis; (genitive) meina, þeina, unsara, and izwara.
Germanic languages continued to be spoken in the Germanic home lands of Scandinavia and central Germany, and are of course till spoken there today.
www.uta.edu /english/tim/courses/4301f98/oct5.html   (1312 words)

  
 Germanic Languages
On 7 February 2003, faculty, graduate students, and staff from the German departments at both universities held a day-long planning meeting and began the process of formalizing their interactions.
On 16-17 January 2004, German department faculty from UNC-CH and Duke held a joint symposium on the German philosopher Walter Benjamin (1892-1940).
Ann Marie Rasmussen (Dept. of Germanic Languages and Literature, Duke University), and Prof.
www.unc.edu /depts/german/studiesingerm/unc-duke.html   (435 words)

  
 Germanic languages. The Columbia Encyclopedia, Sixth Edition. 2001-05
However, the oldest surviving literary text of any Germanic language is in Gothic (see Gothic language).
These modern North Germanic languages are all descendants of Old Norse (see Norse) and have several distinctive grammatical features in common.
The West Germanic languages are English, Frisian, Dutch, Afrikaans, German, and Yiddish.
www.bartleby.com /65/ge/GermancLan.html   (902 words)

  
 European Languages
The western languages generally use /s/ as a plural marker, though it is silent in spoken French, while the eastern languages use vowels.
One third of the vocabulary of the Germanic languages is not of Indo-European origin.
The Slavic languages are spoken in Eastern Europe and Russia and are the harder of the three language groups analyzed to learn.
www.ielanguages.com /eurolang.html   (1535 words)

  
 Germanic Linguistics
The Germanic languages is a subfamily of the Indo-European family of languages, which were spoken by about 420 million people in many parts of the world (chiefly in Europe and the Western Hemisphere).
Consisting of a regular shifting of consonants in groups, the sound shift had already occurred by the time adequate records of the various Germanic languages began to be made in the 7th to 9th century.
French culture and language have given hundreds of loan-words and related ideas to most other Germanic languages, although their effect is not as great as on English.
www.geocities.com /Athens/Atrium/3993/germanics/grm_linguistics.htm   (2365 words)

  
 Germanic blog
The implications of a non-cartographic approach are discussed in four key areas of Germanic syntax (the fine structure of the left periphery, topicalization/focalization, subject placement and object placement).
Germanic varieties, Serbian, Albanian and other Balkan languages alongside Chinese, Japanese, Tagalog are discussed from various theoretical angles such as mainstream generativism, lexical-functional grammar, and functional typology.
Modal verbs in Mainland Scandinavian languages have received much less attention than their English and German counterparts, hence this book seizes the opportunity to present a range of new data and generalizations relevant for the study of Scandinavian languages, but also for the study of modality in Germanic and other languages.
wurmbrand.uconn.edu /Germanic   (2499 words)

  
 The Germanic Languages - Cambridge University Press
Germanic - one of the largest sub-groups of the Indo-European language family - comprises 37 languages with an estimated 470 million speakers worldwide.
This book presents a comparative linguistic survey of the full range of Germanic languages, both ancient and modern, including major world languages such as English and German (West Germanic), the Scandinavian (North Germanic) languages, and the extinct East Germanic languages.
Authoritative and comprehensive, this much-needed survey will be welcomed by scholars and students of the Germanic languages, as well as linguists across the many branches of the field.
www.cambridge.org /catalogue/catalogue.asp?isbn=0521808251   (255 words)

  
 Germanic Languages and Literatures
Study for higher degrees in the Department of Germanic Languages and Literatures (this designation was instituted in 1897) is intended as preparation for a career in teaching and research.
German was first taught in Harvard College in 1825 when Carl (Charles) Follen, a young anti-monarchist and poet, who had fled from Giessen to escape political persecution, became an instructor in German.
Opportunities are provided to teach elementary and intermediate language classes, to tutor undergraduates in literature, and to assist in courses in literature given by members of the department.
www.gsas.harvard.edu /programs/degree/german.html   (2466 words)

  
 Glossika Store - The Germanic Languages (Routledge Language Familydescriptions)   (Site not responding. Last check: )
The chapter on Gothic, which attempts to use the language to reconstruct Proto-Germanic was written by Winfred Lehmann, one of the greatest comparative Indo-European linguists of the 20th century and a keen investigator of the Germanic branch.
Mind you, this is not a language course or even a brief for the beginner who wishes to learn vocabulary or anything like that, it is simply a very forward explanation on History Developments and their overall play and role in society today and before.
I recommend it to anyone whose heart lies in Scandinavian Language and culture, for it presents a very foundational knowledge sourse that is fundamental to all in that course of study.
astore.amazon.com /glossika03-20/detail/0415280796   (878 words)

  
 UCLA Department of Germanic Languages   (Site not responding. Last check: )
The Department of Germanic Languages, with its distinguished scholars, can fill this need by offering quality individual attention to students that is usually only available at private universities.
The undergraduate major is comprised of lower division courses in language, and 13 upper division courses in literature, linguistics, and culture studies.
Germanic Languages, which prepares you in one of the other Germanic languages taught in our department, such as Dutch or Old Norse.
www.humnet.ucla.edu /web/departments/germanic/draft3/program.html   (791 words)

  
 UMass Course Catalog: Germanic Languages & Literatures
The program is structured to set the study of the Germanic languages and their literatures within the contexts of their respective cultures, including their historical, economic, political, philosophical, and cultural aspects.
German drama is occasionally performed and German film series are regularly offered, often in conjunction with the surrounding colleges.
Majors in German Studies are urged to broaden their competence in Germanic languages and literatures by participating in the Dutch and Scandinavian offerings.
www.umass.edu /ug_catalog/archive_2002/germanic.html   (752 words)

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