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Topic: Ghaznavid Empire


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In the News (Tue 23 Apr 19)

  
 Persian Empire - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Ismail's expansion was halted by the Ottoman Empire at the Battle of Chaldiran in 1514, and war with the Ottomans became a fact of life in Safavid Iran.
Iran was left unprepared for the worldwide expansion of European colonial empires in the late 18th century and throughout the 19th century.
The German Empire retaliated on behalf of its ally by spreading a rumour that Kaiser Wilhelm II of Germany had converted to Islam, and sent agents through Iran to attack the oil fields and raise a Jihad against British rule in India.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Persian_Empire   (4635 words)

  
 Ghaznavid Empire - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The Ghaznavid Empire was a state in the region of today's Afghanistan that existed from 963 to 1187.
Mahmud died in (1030), and his son Mas'ud was unable to control the conquered lands and lost the Battle of Dandanaqan in (1040).
Ghaznavid power in northern India continued until the conquest of Lahore in (1187).
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Ghaznavid_Empire   (384 words)

  
 Empire
For many centuries, the term "Empire" in the West applied exclusively to states which considered themselves to be successors to the Roman Empire, such as the Byzantine Empire, the Holy Roman Empire, or, later, the Russian Empire.
In 1204, when Constantinople was sacked during the Fourth Crusade, the Crusaders created a Latin Empire in Constantinople, while the descendents of the Byzantine Empire went to Asia Minor and established two smaller empires: the Empire of Nicaea and the Empire of Trebizond.
The Mongol Empire was governed by kurultai, and there was freedom of religion, tax exemption and extensive trade routes that were nurtured by the Khan.
www.brainyencyclopedia.com /encyclopedia/e/em/empire.html   (1797 words)

  
 Iranica.com - GHAZNAVIDS
Ghaznavid armies penetrated into the Ganges-Jumna Do÷a@b and as far as Gwalior in Central India, but the culmination of his Indian campaigns was the attack on the celebrated shrine of Somnath in the Kathiawar peninsula (416-17 /1025-6), which yielded an immense haul of treasure (Gard^z^, ed.
Ghaznavid vassal principalities on the upper Oxus, K¨ottal and Ùa@g@a@n^a@n, were harried by Qarakhanid raiders, and by 425/1034 the outlying province of K¨úa@razm had slipped from Ghaznavid control.
The line of the Ghaznavids continued for some thirty more years, briefly under Bahra@mæa@h's son K¨osrowæa@h, and then, with a greater duration, under the latter's son K¨osrow Malek (the two similar names are often confused and the events of their reigns conflated in the sources).
www.iranica.com /articles/v10f6/v10f608.html   (3383 words)

  
 Elam - Encyclopedia, History, Geography and Biography
There appear to have been alliances of Elam and Babylonia against the Assyrians; the Babylonian king Mar-biti-apla-ushur (984—79) was of Elamite origin, and Elamites are recorded to have fought with the Babylonian king Marduk-balassu-iqbi against the Assyrian forces under Shamshi-Adad V (823–11).
Among the nations that benefited from the decline of the Assyrians were the Persians, whose presence around Lake Urmia to the north of Elam is attested from the 9th century BC in Assyrian texts.
Thus, not only was "Elam absorbed into the new empire" (Encyclopedia Iranica, Columbia University), becoming part of the millennia old imperial heritage of Iran, but the Elamite civilization is now recognized to be "the earliest civilization of Persia", in the words of Sir Percy Sykes.
www.arikah.net /encyclopedia/Elam   (3151 words)

  
 Persian Empire - Encyclopedia, History, Geography and Biography   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-07)
Generally, the earliest entity considered the Persian Empire is Persia's Achaemenid Empire (648-330 BC) a united Aryan-indigenous Kingdom that originated in the region known as Pars (Persis) and was formed under Cyrus the Great.
In the early 17th century, a final border was agreed upon with the Ottoman Empire; it still forms the border between the Republic of Turkey and Iran today.
In 1919, northern Iran was occupied by the British General William Edmund Ironside to enforce the Turkish Armistice conditions and assist General Dunsterville and Colonel Bicherakhov contain Bolshevik influence (of Mirza Kuchak Khan) in the north.
www.arikah.net /encyclopedia/Persia   (4833 words)

  
 Battle of Dandanaqan - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The Battle of Dandanaqan was fought between the army of Seljuk Turks and the Ghaznavid Empire.
Thereupon, the Ghaznavid Sultan Mas'ud I (son of Mahmud of Ghazni) decided to force the Seljuks to leave his territories.
Seljuks occupied Khorasan and the Turkish and Persian cities of the area, establishing the empire which would later be named as "Great Seljuk Empire".
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Battle_of_Dandanaqan   (253 words)

  
 Top Literature - Achaemenid
Other accomplishments of Darius' reign included codification of the data, a universal legal system upon which much of later Iranian law would be based, and construction of a new capital at Persepolis, where vassal states would offer their yearly tribute at the festival celebrating the spring equinox.
The language in greatest use in the empire was Aramaic.
Macedonian conquest of the Achamenid Empire in 330 BC † The epigraphic evidence for these rulers cannot be confirmed and are often considered to have been invented by Darius I.
encyclopedia.topliterature.com /?title=Achaemenid   (2720 words)

  
 Ghaznavid Empire - Ghaznavid Empire   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-07)
Our Ghaznavid Empire web location is yet expanding so we have not much managed to comprehend volumes of support, however what we have done so far is researched the too best Ghaznavid Empire sites on the net.
Our Ghaznavid Empire web location is yet expanding so we have not much managed to provide lots of file, however what we have done so far is researched the too best Ghaznavid Empire The main assistance that web based Ghaznavid Empire businesses constantly have over traditional Ghaznavid Empire operations is that costs are markedly lower.
The NWFP became part of larger Islamic empires including the Ghaznavid Empire and the empire of Muhammad of Ghor and was nominally controlled by the Delhi Sultanate and Ilkhantate Empire of the Mongols.
laforge.blogiston.com /Ghaznavid_Empire   (795 words)

  
 Persian Empire -   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-07)
Ismail's expansion was halted by the Ottoman Empire at the Battle of Chaldiran in 1514, and war with the Ottomans became a fact of life in Safavid Persia.
Persia was left unprepared for the worldwide expansion of European colonial empires in the late 18th century and throughout the 19th century.
The German Empire retaliated on behalf of its ally by spreading a rumour that the Kaiser Wilhelm II of Germany had converted to Islam, and sent agents through Persia to attack the oil fields and raise a Jihad against British rule in India.
www.indogrid.com /mediawiki/index.php/Persian_Empire   (4401 words)

  
 Khwarezmid Empire - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-07)
The Khwarezmid Empire (also known as the Khwarezmian Empire) was a Muslim state formed by Oghuz Turks in the 11th century in Khwarezmia that lasted until the Mongol invasion in 1220.
The date of the founding of the empire is uncertain.
Khwarezm was a province of the Ghaznavid Empire from 992 to 1041.
www.wikipedia-mirror.co.za /k/h/w/Khwarezmid_Empire_42ae.html   (582 words)

  
 EBRAÚHÈM B. MAS¿UÚD
The empire, although somewhat truncated, was still powerful and extensive; and it was respected by other eastern Islamic potentates for its comparative antiquity and its wealth.
Indeed, the cost of a complex bureaucracy to run the empire and the upkeep of an opulent court life and culture must have been heavy, despite the inflow of bullion and plunder from India.
It was only with their feebler successors that the once mighty Ghaznavid empire became a client state of the Saljuq sultan Sanjar and eventually succumbed to the Ghurids.
www.iranica.com /articles/v8/v8f1/v8f1100.html   (1730 words)

  
 Empire - Gurupedia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-07)
Byzantine Empire, the Holy Roman Empire, or the Russian Empire.
Empires were also often strengthened by the introduction of a common religion, as was the case under Constantine I of the Roman Empire.
Formerly part of the British Empire, when India gained its independence it was split along cultural lines producing the two-part country of Pakistan, which later split yet again resulting in the country of Bangladesh.
www.gurupedia.com /e/em/empire.htm   (758 words)

  
 ipedia.com: Empire Article   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-07)
An empire comprises a region or a set of regions ruled by an emperor or, by extension, any large, multi-ethnic state which maintains its political structure by coercion.
For many centuries, the term "Empire" applied exclusively to states which considered themselves to be successors to the Roman Empire, such as the Byzantine Empire, the Holy Roman Empire, or the Russian Empire.
Many ancient empires maintained control of their subject peoples by controlling the supply of a vital resource, usually water; historians refer to such régimes as "hydraulic empires." The introduction of a common religion also often strengthened empires, as occurred (pace Edward Gibbon) with the adoption of Christianity under Constantine I of the Roman Empire.
www.ipedia.com /empire.html   (901 words)

  
 Sticky Story of the Week!
It was during this period that Lahore assumed considerable importance as the eastern-most bastion of Muslim power and as an outpost for further advance towards the riches of the east.
By the end of his reign, Mahmud's empire extended from Kurdistan in the west to Samarkand in the northeast, and from the Caspian Sea to the Yamuna.
Before 1160, the Ghaznavid Empire covered an area running from central Afghanistan east to the Punjab, with capitals at Ghazni, a city on the banks of Ghazni river in present-day Afghanistan, and at Lahore in present-day Pakistan.
www.rungg.com /streetTeams/pages.php?goto=story0061   (1997 words)

  
 Persian Empire Narrative @ Livy.org   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-07)
The kingdom of Anshan and its successors continued to use Elamite as an official language for quite some time after this, although the new dynasts spoke Persian, an Indo-Iranian tongue.
The Anglo-Russian Convention of 1907 formalised Russian and British spheres of influence over the north and south of the country, respectively, where Britain and Russia each created a "sphere of influence", where the colonial power had the final "say" on economic matters.
This was followed by a German attempt to abduct and control Ahmad Shah Qajar, with the assistance of his mainly-Swedish bodyguard, which was foiled at the last moment.
www.livy.org /encyclopedia/Persian_Empire   (3421 words)

  
 The Islamic World to 1600: The Fractured Caliphate and the Regional Dynasties (Central Asia)
The first significant empire in the region began in 994 under the Ghaznavids, a Turkic people who derived the name of their empire from the city of Ghazna, which eventually became their capital.
The Ghaznavid empire grew to cover much of present-day Iran, Afghanistan, and northwest India and Pakistan, and the Ghaznavids are generally credited with launching Islam into Hindu-dominated India.
The Ghaznavids had provided a degree of unity, but their empire had been further east than the Seljuk empire, and the Turks of Asia Minor had not been a part of it.
www.ucalgary.ca /applied_history/tutor/islam/fractured/centralAsia.html   (898 words)

  
 Ghaznavid rule of Pakistan
The Ghaznavid rule in Pakistan lasted for over hundred and seventy five years from say 1010 A.D. to 1187 A.D. It was during this period that Lahore assumed considerable importance as the eastern-most bastion Muslim power and as an outpost for further advance in the East.
In fact some of the historians of the early period feel that the main cause of the fall of the Ghaznavid Empire was their excessive reliance on Hindus and the appointment of Hindus to positions of great responsibility.
This is the story of the Ghaznavids who are generally considered Hindu-killers.
www.geocities.com /pak_history/ghaznavid.html   (886 words)

  
 To Rule the Earth...   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-07)
What follows is a table of the 25 largest states and empires to have held sway over the earth at one time or another.
The greatest extent of the British Empire was achieved between 1918 and 1922.
Brazil is the major subunit of the Portuguese colonial empire, and remains today the fifth largest state in the world in terms of territory.
www.hostkingdom.net /earthrul.html   (1344 words)

  
 Seleucid Empire - Free net encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-07)
The Seleucid Empire was one of several political states founded after the death of Alexander the Great, whose generals squabbled over the division of Alexander's empire.
His son and successor, Antiochus I Soter, proved unable to pick up where his father had left off in conquering the European portions of Alexander's empire, but was left, nevertheless, with an enormous realm consisting of nearly all of the Asian portions of the Empire.
It was the empire's governmental framework to rule by establishing hundreds of cities for trade and occupational purposes.
www.netipedia.com /index.php/Seleucid_Empire   (2010 words)

  
 Seljuk Turks - Open Encyclopedia
When Malik Shah died in 1092 the empire split, as his brother and four sons quarrelled over the apportioning of the empire among themselves.
His brothers did not recognize his claim to the throne and Mahmud II proclaimed himself Sultan and established a capital in Baghdad.
As the dynasty declined in the middle of the 13th century, the Mongols invaded Anatolia in the 1260s and divided it into small emirates called the Anatolian beyliks, which in turn were later conquered by the Ottomans.
www.openencyclopedia.net /index.php/Seljuks   (513 words)

  
 Kievan Rus Database (Ghaznavids)
The Ghaznavid empire was created by ghulam soldiers of the Samanids, and it largely preserved Samanid traditions and methods of rule.
The Ghaznavids collapsed (before the Karakhanids) under the pressure of the frontier tribes they encountered as a result of their expansion into Khorezm.
1001: Ghaznavid leader, Mahmud, and the Karakhanid leader, Nasr Ilig, negotiated a treaty that established the border of the two empires at the Amu Darya, thereby recreating the traditional division between Khorasan and Mawar'n-nahr.
members.aol.com /bksmyre/Ghaznavids.html   (761 words)

  
 Ghaznavid Empire: Facts and details from Encyclopedia Topic   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-07)
The Ghaznavid Empire was a state in the region of today's Afghanistan Afghanistan quick summary:
The khwarezmid empire (also known as the khwarezmian empire) was a muslim state formed by oghuz turks in the 11th century in khwarezmia that lasted...
The timurid empire (1370-1506) was founded by timur (ruled 1370-1405), EHandler: no quick summary.
www.absoluteastronomy.com /encyclopedia/g/gh/ghaznavid_empire.htm   (1283 words)

  
 Central Asia - South   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-07)
, Ghuristan, Herat, Hunza, Kabul, Kushan Empire, Kushanshahs, Maimana, Nagar, the Nezak, Peshawar, Qandahar, Qonduz, Sakae, Sar-I-Pul, Swat, Tajikistan, Tu-Mi, and Zabulistan.
A loose hegemony over the area was achieved by the Ghaznavids, but as their influence waned, they were replaced by a dynasty of local governors, the Shansabani.
The Emirs of Ghuristan were of the Shansabani clan that eventually would establish the Ghurid Empire in the 1100's.
www.hostkingdom.net /Centasia3.html   (1776 words)

  
 Elam - The real meaning from Timesharetalk wikipedia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-07)
Its culture played a crucial role in the Persian Empire, especially during the Achaemenid dynasty that succeeded it, when the Elamite language remained in official use.
The Elamite period is considered a starting point for the history of Iran (although there were older civilizations in Iranian plateau like Mannaeans kingdom in Iranian Azarbaijan and Shahr-i Sokhta (Burned City) in Zabol and other indigenous civilizations such as Jiroft Kingdom who lived in Iranian plateau but weren't as established as Elamites).
The devastation was however less complete than Assurbanipal boasted, and Elamite rule was resurrected soon after with Shuttir-Nakhkhunte, son of III (not to be confused with Shuttir-Nakhkhunte, son of Indada, a petty king in the first half of the 6th century).
www.timesharetalk.co.uk /wiki.asp?k=Elam   (3307 words)

  
 Brief History of Turkiye (Turkey)
Following this substantial change, the Karahanid Empire of central Asia (10th and 11th centuries) and the Ghaznavid Empire (10th and 12th centuries) developed in areas known today as Iran, Afghanistan, and Northern India.
The magnificent reign of Sultan Suleyman I (1520 -1566) is known as the golden age of the Ottoman Empire.
The Ottoman Empire more than doubled the boundaries of its realm under Suleyman the Magnificent's direction and was transformed into a full-fledged Muslim world empire.
www.iit.edu /~agunsal/turkiye/trhistry.html   (701 words)

  
 Urban Dictionary: empire
It is often used now to define one country which forces other countries to serve it by force and oppresion, this I would not put as a correct term as it includes superpowers and would therefore make this term invalid.
What all empires have in common is that they have all fallen due to various instances, be it civil wars and outbreaks, or even acts of God.
"Although the Empire in Star Wars is ficticious, it is a very good example of an empire, y'know with all those stormtroopers all up in a nice line in one of the docking bays, and all that stuff.
www.urbandictionary.com /define.php?term=empire&r=d   (604 words)

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