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Topic: Glacier ice accumulation


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In the News (Tue 21 May 19)

  
 300glacier
Remember that the glacier ice is always physically moving downhill in valley glaciers or outward in continental glaciers, regardless of whether the ice front is advancing or retreating.
Kettle - a large, slow-melting block of ice becomes separated from the main body of the glacier during the melting process and is surrounded by sediment washed from the glacier; when the ice melts, a depression is left where the ice used to be.
The ice front will remain in the same place as long as the rate of accumulation is equal to the rate of melting.
www.csun.edu /geology/Class_Notes/ES300/300glacier.html

  
 ABSTRACT: Oxygen-isotope variations in the Malaspina and Saskatchewan Glaciers.
This is interpreted as indicating that ice at successively lower points in the glacier tongue originated at progressively higher positions in the accumulation area, thus confirming Reid's early deductions concerning flow lines in a valley glacier.
Ice in the glacier tongue has a higher average O18/O16 ratio than the 1953-1954 layer of firn in the accumulation area.
Oxygan-isotope analyses of ice and firm from the Saskatchewan Glacier (Banff National Park, Alberta), Canada, and the Malaspina Glacier (St. Elias Mts.), Alaska, show that variations in O18/O16 ratios are likely to be of considerable value in glacialogical research.
cgrg.geog.uvic.ca /abstracts/EpsteinOxygen-isotopeOxygan-isotope1959.html

  
 ES 331/767 Glossary
Glacier accumulation/ablation: gain of ice mass mainly through snowfall by a glacier; ablation is the loss of mass mainly by melting or calving.
Glacier ice: ice formed from the accumulation and recrystallization of snow, which exhibits past or present flow.
Deglaciation is the opposite, the shrinking of ice sheets and glaciers to uncover land areas; the world is presently in an interglaciation in which roughly 10% of the land is ice covered.
academic.emporia.edu /aberjame/ice/gloss.htm   (2277 words)

  
 SCAR » Report 13
Establishing velocities of glaciers, ice streams, ice sheets, and ice shelves is essential to calculate the discharge of the mass balance equation.
Surface elevation was measured by GPS at Tarn Flat and the Strandline Glaciers (1993) and along the traverse from Terra Nova Bay to the East Antarctic plateau 280 km (1993).
Velocities on the shelf near the DeVicq Glacier increase westward to near 0.5 km yr -1 and reach 0.6 km yr -1 at the glacier.
www.scar.org /publications/reports/13/taskgroup3.html   (2277 words)

  
 SCAR » Report 13
Establishing velocities of glaciers, ice streams, ice sheets, and ice shelves is essential to calculate the discharge of the mass balance equation.
Surface elevation was measured by GPS at Tarn Flat and the Strandline Glaciers (1993) and along the traverse from Terra Nova Bay to the East Antarctic plateau 280 km (1993).
Velocities on the shelf near the DeVicq Glacier increase westward to near 0.5 km yr -1 and reach 0.6 km yr -1 at the glacier.
www.scar.org /publications/reports/13/taskgroup3.html   (2277 words)

  
 Dissecting a Glacier
The topmost portion of the Glacier, at its coldest portions, is known as the zone of accumulation.
Glaciers can be divided into 2 general types, Alpine or Mountain Glaciers, those Glaciers which originate on a mountain or in a mountain range, and the Continental Glaciers, the large masses of Glacial ice in Greenland and Antarctica.
Continental glaciers are subdivided into 2 main types based on their size: the relatively small ice caps, and the mammoth ice sheets.
members.aol.com /scipioiv/glacierparts.html   (929 words)

  
 MSN Encarta - Glacier
Glacier, an enduring accumulation of ice, snow, water, rock, and sediment that moves under the influence of gravity.
This accumulation is most common in the polar regions, but can also occur at high altitudes on mountains even near the equator.
Glaciers occur in many different forms and locations, from the big ice sheet that covers the entire continent of Antarctica to the small valley glaciers that are present in many parts of the world.
encarta.msn.com /encyclopedia_761574629/Glacier.html   (814 words)

  
 Glossary - Terms Glacier Types
A glacier formed below the terminus of a hanging glacier by the accumulation, and reconstitution by pressure melting (regelation), of ice blocks that have fallen and/or avalanched from the terminus of the hanging glacier.
A glacier-like landform that often heads in a cirque and consists of a valley-filling accumulation of angular rock blocks.
A glacier with a or temperature-regime in which liquid water coexists with frozen water (glacier ice) during part or even all of the year.
pubs.usgs.gov /of/2004/1216/glaciertypes/glaciertypes.html   (1013 words)

  
 Fox Glacier New Zealand Glaciers West Coast South Island New Zealand
At present the Fox Glacier is shrinking as the melt rate exceeds the accumulation in the upper snow fields.
As the glacier obeys the laws of gravity the ice is slowly compacted and the river of ice continues to flow down the valley first formed thousands of years ago at the time of the first Ice Ages.
The glacier is feed by the vast snowfields that drain the southern alps at a height of approximately 2000 metres.
www.weheka.co.nz /fox.asp   (490 words)

  
 MSN Encarta - Search Results - Tasman Glacier
Glacier, an enduring accumulation of ice, snow, water, rock, and sediment that moves under the influence of gravity.
Ice Ages, periods in Earth’s history when sea ice or glaciers have covered a significant portion of the planet’s surface and significant cooling of the...
Ice Ages, when glaciers covered large land areas
ca.encarta.msn.com /Tasman_Glacier.html   (118 words)

  
 Glaciers and Glaciation
Glaciers are masses of ice that flow under the influence of gravity.
Continental glaciers (ice sheets) represent great ice sheets that obscure most of the topography over large sections (at least 50,000 km2) of a continent.
Glaciers are the largest reservoir of fresh water and contain about 2.15% of the world's water.
www.geo.ua.edu /intro03/ice.html   (2571 words)

  
 Blue Ice - Introduction
For many, kicking crampons into blue glacial ice, looking skyward from the bottom of a crevasse, or mapping past ablation horizons is a geographic and technical impossibility.
The Blue Glacier is a large contributor to the 25,000 gallons of water per second that flow down the Hoh River to the Pacific Ocean fifty-five kilometers downstream.
Blue Glacier flows down the north side of Mount Olympus (2428m) in the heart of the Olympic Mountains.
www.acad.carleton.edu /curricular/GEOL/Links/AlumContributions/blueice/intro.html   (803 words)

  
 Glossary - Terms Glacier Types
A glacier formed below the terminus of a hanging glacier by the accumulation, and reconstitution by pressure melting (regelation), of ice blocks that have fallen and/or avalanched from the terminus of the hanging glacier.
A glacier with a or temperature-regime in which liquid water coexists with frozen water (glacier ice) during part or even all of the year.
A glacier-like landform that often heads in a cirque and consists of a valley-filling accumulation of angular rock blocks.
pubs.usgs.gov /of/2004/1216/glaciertypes/glaciertypes.html   (1013 words)

  
 Glaciers and Glaciation
Valley glaciers are confined to mountain valleys and flow from higher to lower elevations, whereas continental glaciers cover vast areas and flow outward in all directions from a zone of accumulation.
Continental glaciers transport most of their sediment in the lower part of the ice, whereas valley glaciers may carry sediment in all parts of the ice.
Glaciers are masses of ice on land that move by plastic flow and basal slip.
geowords.com /p_/chap11glac.htm   (934 words)

  
 Glacier atlas of Mt. Rainier
The glacier is in constant motion, and the ice in the accumulation zone flows down to lower altitudes, which is called the “ablation zone”.
While the response of each glacier depends on its local conditions, glacier loss seems to be largely the result of a regional tendency toward warmer weather, resulting in less snowfall and high rates of ablation (the loss of snow and ice by melting).
At least one of the current glaciers on Mount Rainier may been a tributary of this ice sheet.
www.nps.gov /mora/ncrd/glacier/Basics00.html   (2059 words)

  
 CRREL Library - Current Literature May 1997
The behavior of glaciers, polar ice-caps and lakes can be studied by means of natural and artificial radioactivity measurements conducted on snow (Alps, Arctic and Antarctic) and sediments samples.
Typical applications concern primarily dating, and the determination of mean annual accumulation rates of glaciers, sedimentation rate and mixing time in lakes, with their associated spatio-temporal variations.
Climate and glacier response in the Pyrenees, 1878-1994.
www.crrel.usace.army.mil /library/currentlits/currli17.htm   (2059 words)

  
 BrainyGeography - Lookup any Place by Feature
glacier - body or stream of ice moving outward and downslope from an area of accumulation; an area of relatively permanent snow or ice on the top or side of a mountain or mountainous area (icefield, ice patch, snow patch).
school - building or group of buildings used as an institution for study, teaching, and learning (academy, college, high school, university).
www.brainygeography.com /definitions.html   (2059 words)

  
 Tasman Glacier Chart
It takes roughly 100 years for the ice to work its way from the accumulation zone, or neve, to the bottom of the ablation zone where it is slowly converted from ice directly to water vapor without first melting into water.
The affects of climate on glaciers is complex and not completely understood and depends on winter snow fall and the warm summer rains.
Over the last eighty years the glacier has been shrinking and slumping as global temperatures rise.
www.juanr.com /pages/new_zealand/chart.htm   (80 words)

  
 Glaciers
Ice evaporates on the exposed surfaces of the glacier
Glaciers move by the slow deformation of the ice by an increase in pressure from the overlying ice
Differences in the accumulation and ablation rates cause the glacier to change in size
vortex.weather.brockport.edu /~mnoll/gel100/ch14.html   (1016 words)

  
 Calafate, Argentino Lake and Perito Moreno Glacier
This glacier is in a state of equilibrium between the ice that it loses at the front and the ice that gains from the accumulation of snow at the source.
Glacier border, from this point one gets on to of it to start the min-trekking (50° 29' S and 73° 3' W) Fotograph from on top the Moreno Glacier, the Rico branch of Argentino Lake can be seen.
The main attraction of El Calafate is that Perito Moreno Glacier is only 85 km west of the town.
platense.dyn.dhs.org /personal/viaje/gmoreno/index_e.htm   (1016 words)

  
 The Work of Ice (Glaciers and Glacial Landforms) Study Guide, Physical Geography, College of Alameda, Rita Haberlin, Instructor
Continental glaciers (ice sheets) advance from a central region of accumulation and cover the landscape.
Glaciers erode the landscape by plucking (the lifting away of bedrock as the ice moves forward), and abrasion (the rock enclosed in the ice scrapes and grinds the underlying rock).
Glaciers transport moraine (rock debris carried and deposited by ice) beneath, within, and on the surface of the moving ice (lateral and medial moraine).
www.members.aol.com /rhaberlin/glstyg.htm   (824 words)

  
 Amateur Geologist Structured Geological Glossary: Ice and Glaciers
A term used by glaciologists (scientists who study glacier) for the boundary where the amount of snow loss from melting and evaporation equals the amount of snow accumulation from snowfall (also called the annual snowline).
Ice shelves have formed along polar coast (e.g., Antarctica and Greenland); they are very wide, with some extending several hundreds of kilometers toward the sea from the coastline.
Like ice sheets, these ice caps are not constrained by the existing relief and exert a modifying effect on the climate.
www.amateurgeologist.com /content/glossary/glacial/glacial.html   (1724 words)

  
 Columbia Ice Fields
This 325 square km accumulation of ice feeds eight large glaciers.
Experience the Athabasca Glacier on Brewster's "Ice Age Adventure" in their specially designed Snocoach*.
From the highway the Athabasca and Dome glaciers are visible and there is a fine view of the glacier-draped north face of 3,491 meter Mt. Athabasca.
www.mtrobson.com /html/ice_fields.html   (1724 words)

  
 El Calafate - Perito Moreno Glacier - Patagonia
The process by which glacier ice formation — crystalline blue mass — results is by the accumulation of snows century after century, producing an air release from the interior of its own weight.
Departure from Punta Bandera sailing for 1:45 hs by the Ice floes Channel until we reach the wall of the breaking of the Perito Moreno Glacier.
After sailing parallel to all the wall of the glacier, we land in opposite the glacier, at Perito Moreno quay and then we go to the footbridges, typical view point.
www.traveltango.com.ar /english/arg/fte/fte_eng.htm   (1724 words)

  
 Blue-Ice Runways in Antarctica
In the late 1980's NSF sponsored a project, with CRREL involvement, to locate "blue ice" runways--areas with no net annual snow accumulation, so that the resultant ice surface is capable of supporting aircraft landings using wheels instead of skis.
Excerpts from "Airfields on Antarctic Glacier Ice" by Malcolm Mellor and Charles Swithinbank, CRREL 1989:
This is Plunkett Point, I'm standing on the Mill Glacier, and on the other (northwest) side of the "point" is the Beardmore.
www.southpolestation.com /trivia/history/blueice.html   (1724 words)

  
 BBC News SCI/TECH Antarctic ice sheet shrinks
Their data suggest that the thinning is the consequence of changes in the ice flow within the PIG, not of changes in snow accumulation.
The loss is being caused by changes in the fast-flowing Pine Island glacier (PIG), the largest glacier in West Antarctica, which carries ice from the interior to the sea.
A team of UK scientists has found evidence that a large area of Antarctic ice is shrinking.
news.bbc.co.uk /hi/english/sci/tech/newsid_1148000/1148183.stm   (642 words)

  
 26421
Abstract The Neoglacial evolution of the Tasman Glacier is reconstructed from the distribution of ice-marginal moraines and from the subglacial topography.
The expansionary tendency of the debris-covered glacier is interpreted as a response to long-term (millennial) accumulation of both subglacial and supraglacial debris.
Comparison with other glaciers shows that the expansionary tendency is widespread but may be manifest in a variety of sediment-landform associations.
www.cig.ensmp.fr /%7Eiahs/redbooks/a264/26421.htm   (185 words)

  
 Glacier Bay National Park and Preserve: Administrative History (Chapter II)
Muir, Wright, and Reid had all remarked upon the phenomenal retreat of the glaciers; now the accumulation of scientific observation over a twenty-year span made it possible to study the process.
In the latter two weeks Wright made triangulations on eight jutting ice pinnacles, from which he estimated that the glacier moved seventy feet per day in the center and ten feet on each flank, while the terminus, due to calving of icebergs, held steady.
John Muir's role in the history of Glacier Bay was primarily that of explorer and publicist.
www.nps.gov /glba/adhi/adhi2.htm   (185 words)

  
 Earth Sciences and Geography : Keele University
Glaciers are sustained by the accumulation of snow in their upper reaches (accumlation area).
Glacial till is associated with direct deposition from a glacier (in the absence of meltwater) and is characterised by a broad range of particle sizes (hence the old term boulder clay) and lithologies, and a lack of sorting.
The majority of glacial landforms are produced at the glacier bed (the subglacial zone), where processes of erosion, transport and deposition are at their most active.
www.esci.keele.ac.uk /services/education/glaciers/gallery.htm   (185 words)

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