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Topic: Global Maritime Distress Safety System


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SOS

In the News (Fri 19 Apr 19)

  
  OMM-JCOMM-GMDSS / GMDSS
Ship distress and safety communications entered a new era on 1 February 1999 with the full implementation of the Global Maritime Distress and Safety System (GMDSS) - an integrated communications system using satellite and terrestrial radiocommunications to ensure that no matter where a ship is in distress, aid can be dispatched.
The regulations governing the GMDSS are contained in the International Convention for the Safety of Life at Sea (SOLAS), 1974.
The GMDSS communications system under SOLAS complements the International Convention on Maritime Search and Rescue (SAR), 1979, which was adopted to develop a global SAR plan.
weather.gmdss.org /gmdss.html   (252 words)

  
 Equipment Fact Sheet: Global Maritime Distress Safety System (GMDSS)
Global Maritime Distress and Safety System (GMDSS) is an international system that uses terrestrial and satellite technology and ship-board radio systems to ensure rapid, automated alerting of shore-based communication and rescue authorities, in addition to ships in the immediate vicinity, in the event of a marine distress.
The GMDSS was adopted by the International Maritime Organisation (IMO), a United Nations specialized agency responsible for ship safety and the prevention of marine pollution.
The GMDSS combines various subsystems - all of which have different limitations with respect to coverage - into one overall system, and the oceans are divided into four sea areas: A1 - A4.
www.fao.org /figis/servlet/static?dom=equipment&xml=gmdss.xml   (896 words)

  
 GMDSS
The Global Maritime Distress and Safety System (GMDSS) is an international system which uses terrestrial and satellite technology and ship-board radio-systems to ensure rapid, automated, alerting of shore based communication and rescue authorities, in addition to ships in the immediate vicinity, in the event of a marine distress.
The GMDSS also requires ships to receive broadcasts of maritime safety information which could prevent a distress from happening, and requires ships to carry satellite emergency position indicating beacons (EPIRBs), which float free from a sinking ship and alert rescue authorities with the ship's identity and location.
GMDSS installations on ships include one or more search and rescue radar transponders,  devices which are used to locate survival craft or distress vessels by creating a series of dots on a rescuing ship's 3 cm radar display.
www.mcga.gov.uk /c4mca/mcga-safety_information/mcga-navigation/dqs-navcomms-comm/dqs-newpage-19.htm?printout=1   (968 words)

  
 GMDSS   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Ship distress and safety communications entered a new era on 1 February 1999 with the full implementation of the Global Maritime Distress and Safety System (GMDSS) - an integrated communications system using satellite and terrestrial radiocommunications to ensure that no matter where a ship is in distress, aid can be dispatched.
Under the GMDSS, all passenger ships and all cargo ships over 300 gross tonnage on international voyages have to carry specified satellite and radiocommunications equipment, for sending and receiving distress alerts and maritime safety information, and for general communications.
In 1988, IMO's Member States adopted the basic requirements of the global maritime distress and safety system or GMDSS as part of SOLAS, and the system was phased in from 1992 onwards.
www.imo.org /safety/mainframe.asp?topic_id=389   (844 words)

  
 GMDSS - the Golobal Maritime Distress and Safety System   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Safship master Nick Cooper slammed the operation of the Global Maritime Distress and Safety System convention at GMDSS Conference held in Plymouth, UK, last week.
Capt Cooper said the system of automated distress calls using Digital Selective Calling was "almost totally unworkable, impractical and unreliable".
But most other speakers reported major problems with the system, which is based on now-outdated technology, including a very high incidence of false alarms, slow implementation of the system with many ships unlikely to meet the February 1999 deadline and only a handful of countries, mainly in northern Europe, having acted to implement GMDSS effectively.
www.users.zetnet.co.uk /rdixon/maritime/gmdss.htm   (182 words)

  
 A.888 U.S. Draft
The satellite system should be designed for and should provide adequate channel and power capacity for processing effectively, and with an availability as stated in section 3.5, the maritime distress, urgency, safety and general communication traffic estimated to be required by the ships using the system.
Any system designed for use in the GMDSS should be able to recognize the four levels of priority and give appropriate access for communications in the ship-to-shore direction and in the shore-to-ship direction for distress, urgency and safety traffic originated by RCCs or other Search and Rescue Authorities.
Maritime distress alerts/calls and distress messages should include the ship identity and the earth station identity or other means of identifying the point of access to the satellite network.
www.state.gov /e/eb/cip/imso/2005/52628.htm   (3475 words)

  
 Ship distress and safety communications enter new era   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Ship distress and safety communications enter a new era today with the full implementation of the Global Maritime Distress and Safety System (GMDSS) - an integrated communications system using satellite and terrestrial radiocommunications to ensure that no matter where a ship is in distress, aid can be dispatched.
The regulations governing the GMDSS are contained in the International Convention for the Safety of Life at Sea (SOLAS), 1974, which has been ratified by 138 countries, covering 98.36 percent of the world merchant shipping fleet by tonnage.
William A. O'Neil said today that the full implementation of the GMDSS is an important date in maritime history, coming as it does almost exactly 100 years after the first use of wireless technology to aid a ship in distress.
www.imo.org /Newsroom/contents.asp?topic_id=69&doc_id=582   (792 words)

  
 Hodgens Yacht Insurance News- What is GMDSS from Inmarsat
Under the GMDSS, all cargo ships of 300 gross registered tonnes and upwards and all passenger ships engaged on international voyages must be equipped with radio equipment that conforms to international standards as set out in the system.
The GMDSS was adopted by the International Maritime Organisation (IMO), a specialised agency of the United Nations with responsibility for ship safety and the prevention of marine pollution.
The GMDSS was adopted by means of amendments to the International Convention for the Safety of Life at Sea (SOLAS), 1974.
www.yachtinsure.com /news-gmdss-inmarsat.htm   (1122 words)

  
 Licensing Procedures Manual for Maritime Radio
In addition, in the case of equipment used in a maritime environment, radio equipment needs to be able to operate satisfactorily under the conditions likely to be encountered on board a ship at sea and to be compatible with other radio systems used on board the vessel.
The GMDSS was developed by the International Maritime Organisation (IMO) and supported by the ITU as the worldwide Distress and Safety communications system.
The GMDSS became operational in 1991 and on 1st February 1999 became a compulsory requirement for all Safety Of Life At Sea (SOLAS) convention vessels; that is vessels over 300 gross registered tons and various classes of passenger and fishing vessels.
www.ofcom.org.uk /static/archive/ra/topics/maritime/maritimemanual/maritime.htm   (1937 words)

  
 Navtronics - eLibrary/Resources (GMDSS)
This new system, which the world's maritime nations, including the United States, are implementing, is based upon a combination of satellite and terrestrial radio services, and has changed international distress communications from being primarily ship-to-ship based to ship-to-shore (Rescue Coordination Center) based.
Three types of Inmarsat ship earth station terminals are recognized by the GMDSS: the Inmarsat A, B and C. The Inmarsat A and B, an updated version of the A, provide ship/shore, ship/ship and shore/ship telephone, telex and high-speed data services, including a distress priority telephone and telex service to and from rescue coordination centers.
The GMDSS installation on ships include one or more search and rescue radar transponders, devices which are used to locate survival craft or distressed vessels by creating a series of dots on a rescuing ship's 3 cm radar display.
www.navtronics.com /gmdss.htm   (2606 words)

  
 SIGHTINGS   (Site not responding. Last check: )
The International Maritime Organization set Feb. 1 as its target date to replace dots and dashes with a satellite system -- the Global Maritime Distress and Safety System -- that can pinpoint the location of a ship signalling for help.
The new system is mandatory for all international freighters over 300 gross tonnes, all passenger vessels and self-propelled oil drilling rigs.
Distress signals are beamed from a ship to an Inmarsat satellite, which relays the alert to a rescue co-ordinating station on the ground.
www.rense.com /ufo2/morse.htm   (310 words)

  
 National Distress System - USCG Navigation Center
The Coast Guard currently operates a National Distress System, a network of about 300 VHF transceivers and antenna high-sites which are remotely controlled by regional communications centers to provide coverage extending out to at least 20 nautical miles from shore, and often much further.
Each National Distress System VHF site consists of a receiver guarding VHF Channel 16, the maritime distress, safety and calling channel, and a transceiver capable of operating on one of six fixed maritime channels.
The National Distress System is operated by 45 Coast Guard Group and Section Command Centers, each acting as a Maritime Rescue Coordination Center having a specific area of responsibility.
www.navcen.uscg.gov /marcomms/cgcomms/nds.htm   (820 words)

  
 Air Waves - Newsletter
Maritime frequency bands are internationally agreed and are set out in the Radio Regulations, which are agreed at the World Radio Conferences of the ITU.
The GMDSS has been developed by the International Maritime Organisation and is supported by the International Telecommunications Union (ITU) as the worldwide distress and safety system.
GMDSS became operational in 1991 and on 1st February 1999 became a compulsory requirement for all SOLAS convention vessels, i.e.
www.ofcom.org.uk /static/archive/ra/topics/maritime/airwaves/airwaves1/airwaves.htm   (3075 words)

  
 Search and Rescue   (Site not responding. Last check: )
The Global Maritime Distress and Safety System (GMDSS) is a new international system using improved terrestrial and satellite technology and ship-board radio systems.
GMDSS was developed through the International Maritime Organization (IMO) and represents a significant change in the way maritime safety communications are conducted.
When a GMDSS distress alert is received, the centre must re-issue an "all ships" broadcast in the vicinity so that vessels in the immediate area are aware and can respond.
www.ccg-gcc.gc.ca /sar/gmdss_e.htm   (1480 words)

  
 Articles - GALILEO positioning system   (Site not responding. Last check: )
The Galileo positioning system is a proposed satellite navigation system, to be built by the European Union (EU) as an alternative to the Global Positioning System (which is controlled by the military of the United States) and the Russian GLONASS.
A strong motivator for an independent system is that, though GPS is now widely used worldwide for civilian applications, it is a military system, which as recently as 2000 had selective availability that may be enabled in particular areas of coverage during times of war.
The European geostationary navigation overlay system is a system of satellites and ground stations designed to increase the accuracy of the current GPS and GLONASS in Europe.
www.spotgps.com /articles/GALILEO_positioning_system   (1549 words)

  
 [No title]
The Global Maritime Distress and Safety System (GMDSS) is an automated Distress and Safety alerting system which uses Digital Selective Calling (DSC) techniques on the International Maritime VHF Band (CH70), the Marine M.F. Band (2,187.5 kHz), the Marine H.F. Bands (4,207.5 kHz, 6,312 kHz, 8,414.5 kHz, 12,577 kHz, and 16,804 kHz), and satellite techniques.
When interfaced with a position-fixing system, Distress Alerts transmitted by means of DSC contain the identification of the vessel in distress as well as the position of the vessel.
Within the GMDSS there is no obligation on any Administration to provide for aural watchkeeping on the "old" Distress and Calling frequencies, 156.800 MHz (CH16) VHF and 2,182 kHz M.F. In Ireland, it is the intention to keep watch on these frequencies for the time being.
www.dcmnr.gov.ie /files/05-1998.doc   (792 words)

  
 FCC - Global Maritime Distress and Safety System (GMDSS)   (Site not responding. Last check: )
The GMDSS is an internationally recognized distress and radio communication safety system for ships replacing the previous ship to ship safety system, which relied on a manual Morse code system on 500 kHz and voice radiotelephony on Channel 16 and 2182 kHz.
The GMDSS is mandated for ships internationally by the International Maritime Organization (IMO) Safety of Life at Sea Convention (SOLAS), 1974, as amended in 1988, and carries the force of an international treaty.
If the GMDSS ship chooses at sea maintenance, then it must have a person holding a T-1, T-2, G, or GMDSS Radio Maintainer's License, who could be one of the GMDSS radio operators, the radio officers, or any other qualified member of the crew.
wireless.fcc.gov /marine/gmdss.html   (1677 words)

  
 IMO: Focus on IMO: Global Maritime Distress and Safety System -
When maritime nations gathered together in 1914 to develop the first international shipping safety convention, following the Titanic disaster two years earlier, the focus was not just on preventing shipping accidents but also improving the changes of survival if one should occur.
The system also provides for urgency and safety communications and the dissemination of maritime safety information, including navigational and meteorological warnings.
William O'Neil determined that the time had come for IMO to undertake, as a matter of priority, a global consideration of this problem and to adopt whatever measures might be required to ensure that ships in distress would be provided with appropriate assistance and facilities as dictated by the circumstances.
www.oceansatlas.org /cds_static/en/imo_focus_imo_global_maritime_distress_safety__en_2347_41271.html   (375 words)

  
 Jamaica Defence Force Coast Guard Unit Notice Board
Global Maritime Distress and Safety System (GMDSS) was initiated by the International Maritime Organisation (IMO) and the International Telecommunications Union (ITU) to take advantage of more modern means of communication to improve Maritme Radio Communication Series as it relates to the Safety of Life at Sea (SOLAS).
GMDSS is a combination of terrestrial and satellite means of communication which allows a ship anywhere in the world to communicate with a shore station.
The JDF Coast Guard operates an international coast radio station whose primary role is to listen for maritime distress and safety signals.
www.jdfmil.org /units/coast_guard/cg_notice_1.htm   (563 words)

  
 GLOBAL MARITIME DISTRESS AND SAFETY SYSTEM TRAINING
The Global Maritime Distress and Safety System (GMDSS) was established by the International Maritime Organization (IMO) and put into place after the October 1988 amendments to the 1974 International Convention for the Safety Of Life At Sea (SOLAS).
This system uses satellite communications and other leading technology and will progressively eliminate the need for radiotelegraphy which has been the basis of the communication system for distress at sea since the beginning of the century.
This system, intended to improve distress and safety communications at sea, allows the control of all communications directly from the bridge, using advanced equipment controlled by micro-computers.
www.imq.qc.ca /eng/edtc/smdsm_A.htm   (441 words)

  
 International distress frequency -   (Site not responding. Last check: )
The nearby frequencies of 518 kHz and 490 kHz are used for the Navtex component of GMDSS.
For most of its history, the international distress frequency was referred to by its equivalent wavelength, 600 meters, or, using the earlier frequency units, 500 kilocycles or 500 kc.
Article XXI of the Service Regulations required that, whenever an SOS distress call was heard, all transmissions unrelated to the emergency had to immediately cease, until the emergency was declared over.
psychcentral.com /psypsych/500_kHz   (979 words)

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