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Topic: Global aphasia


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  Global aphasia - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The symptoms of global aphasia are those of severe Broca's aphasia and Wernicke's aphasia combined.
Global aphasia is a type of aphasia that is usually associated with a large lesion in the persylvian area.
Persons with global aphasia are usually mute or use repetitive vocalization.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Global_aphasia   (245 words)

  
 Aphasia - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Aphasia (also Aphemia - from Greek α, without, and φημη, speech), is a loss or impairment of the ability to produce and/or comprehend language, due to brain damage.
Aphasia can be assessed in a variety of ways, from quick clinical screening at the bedside to several-hour-long batteries of tasks that examine the key components of language and communication.
Broca's aphasia is thus characterized as a nonfluent aphasia.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Aphasia   (1488 words)

  
 Aphasia
Aphasia is a defect or loss of language function in which the comprehension or expression of words (or nonverbal equivalents of words) is impaired as a result of injury to or degeneration of the language centers in the cerebral cortex.
Aphasia is caused by a brain injury, as may occur during a traumatic accident or when the brain is deprived of oxygen during a stroke.
Aphasia may be classified as receptive, in which expression is better than comprehension; expressive, in which comprehension is better than expression; or global, in which comprehension and expression are both impaired.
neurology.health-cares.net /aphasia.php   (763 words)

  
 National Aphasia Association   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-24)
Aphasia is always due to injury to the brain-most commonly from a stroke, particularly in older individuals.
Global aphasia: This is the most severe form of aphasia, and is applied to patients who can produce few recognizable words and understand little or no spoken language.
Global aphasia may often be seen immediately after the patient has suffered a stroke and it may rapidly improve if the damage has not been too extensive.
www.aphasia.org /facts.php   (1428 words)

  
 eMedicine - Aphasia : Article by Daniel H Jacobs, MD   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-24)
In Wernicke aphasia, neighborhood signs include a superior quadrantanopsia due to involvement of optic radiations, limb apraxia due to involvement of the inferior parietal lobule or its connections to the premotor cortices, finger agnosia, acalculia, or alexia with agraphia (components of the Gerstmann syndrome) due to involvement of the angular gyrus.
Global aphasia commonly affects patients with large infarcts of the left cerebral hemisphere, typically involving the occlusion of the internal carotid or middle cerebral artery and resulting in a large, wedge-shaped wipeout of two thirds or more of the left hemisphere.
Aphasia is diagnosed on the basis of localization (involvement of the left hemisphere or thalamus); therefore, careful, thorough mental-state examination is essential.
www.emedicine.com /neuro/topic437.htm   (5694 words)

  
 Aphasia
Aphasia is a language disorder caused by damage in a specific area of the brain that controls language expression and comprehension, and leaves a person unable to communicate effectively with others.
Global aphasia is the result of damage to a large portion of the language-dominant side of the brain.
Confirmation of aphasia, extent of the disorder, and prediction for successful treatment may be assessed and confirmed by language tests conducted by a speech-language pathologist.
www.healthsystem.virginia.edu /uvahealth/adult_ent/aphasia.cfm   (548 words)

  
 Aphasia
Wernicke's aphasia is caused by damage to the temporal lobe, or the side portion, of the language-dominant area of the brain.
Global aphasia is caused by damage to both the left temporal and frontal lobes.
Transcortical aphasia is caused by damage to the language areas of the left hemisphere that are outside the primary language areas.
www.hmc.psu.edu /healthinfo/a/aphasia.htm   (1297 words)

  
 Information about Aphasia
Aphasia is a language disorder that results from damage to portions of the brain that are responsible for language.
Global aphasia, results from damage to extensive portions of the language areas of the brain.
Individuals with global aphasia have severe communication difficulties and may be extremely limited in their ability to speak or comprehend language.
www.mamashealth.com /head/aphasia.asp   (465 words)

  
 SID | Global Aphasia: Q & A
Global aphasia is an acquired disorder characterized by severe impairments in all aspects of language-based communication: reading, writing, speaking, and understanding speech.
In this investigation, the frequency of global aphasia was found to be thirty-two percent in the acute phase of stroke and seven percent one year after stroke.
Additional information can be obtained from the healthcare professionals who are caring for the individual with global aphasia and from reference materials that are available on the Internet or in your local medical library.
www.stroke-info.com /special_presentations/global_aphasia   (759 words)

  
 Aphasia - Somerville, New Jersey NJ
Aphasia is usually first recognized by the physician who treats the individual for his or her brain injury.
Aphasia therapy strives to improve an individual's ability to communicate by helping the person to use remaining abilities, to restore language abilities as much as possible, to compensate for language problems, and to learn other methods of communicating.
Aphasia research is exploring new ways to evaluate and treat aphasia as well as to further understanding of the function of the brain.
www.somersetmedicalcenter.com /13596.cfm   (1152 words)

  
 MossRehab ResourceNet-Aphasia Text Homepage
Aphasia is a language disorder that results from damage to the portion of the brain that is dominant for language.
Aphasia usually occurs suddenly, frequently the result of a stroke or head injury, but it may also develop slowly as in the case of a brain tumor.
Individuals with global aphasia have major communication difficulties and may be extremely limited in their ability to speak or comprehend language.
www.mossresourcenet.org /textapha.htm   (1189 words)

  
 Gobal aphasia
Global aphasia is caused by widespread damage to the language areas of the left hemisphere.
- Aphasia is a defect or loss of language function in which the comprehension or expression of words (or nonverbal equivalents of words) is impaired as a result of brain injury.
- Global aphasia is caused by widespread damage to the language areas of the left hemisphere.
neurology.health-cares.net /global-aphasia.php   (425 words)

  
 Aphasia Information Page: National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS)
Aphasia is a neurological disorder caused by damage to the portions of the brain that are responsible for language.
Aphasia is not a disease, but a symptom of brain damage.
The outcome of aphasia is difficult to predict given the wide range of variability of the condition.
www.ninds.nih.gov /disorders/aphasia/aphasia.htm   (548 words)

  
 furniture for the people
Vocabulary access is limited in persons with Broca's aphasia, and their formation of sounds is often laborious and clumsy.
Wernicke's aphasia - In this form of aphasia the ability to grasp the meaning of spoken words is chiefly impaired, while the ease of producing connected speech is not much affected.
Other varieties of aphasia In addition to the foregoing syndromes that are seen repeatedly by speech clinicians, there are many other possible combinations of deficits that do not exactly fit into these categories.
www.furnitureforthepeople.com /aphasia.htm   (1930 words)

  
 Texas Medical Center NEWS
Aphasia is a family of disorders in the ability to use language.
Aphasia may also be caused by physical injury to the brain, brain tumor, or other forms of neurological disease.
Sarno and her colleagues recently completed a study looking at improvements resulting from aphasia therapy directed at a patient’s psychosocial functioning at a time after onset when many professionals might believe that further improvement in language functioning would be only modest.
www.tmc.edu /tmcnews/06_01_03/page_24.html   (755 words)

  
 Stroke Survivors of Ottawa (Canada)   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-24)
The characteristics of aphasia depend on the portion of the brain that is injured.
Global aphasia is a very severe language disturbance, where all language modalities are affected.
Aphasia can recover spontaneously especially in the event of a TIA or where blood flow to the brain in temporarily interrupted.
www.strokesurvivors.ca /index.php?nav=aphasia_def_class   (1172 words)

  
 Aphasia
Aphasia is a complex acquired neurogenic disorder in which there are problems with speaking or speech is lost.
Conduction aphasia is also known as disconnection syndrome because it is a lesion that disconnects Broca's area from Wernicke's area via the arcuate fasciculus and is characterized by a comparatively reduced ability to repeat spoken language.
Anomic aphasia is characterized by an inability to come up with the names of common objects.
www.people.virginia.edu /~jpd3n/aphasia.html   (266 words)

  
 Aphasia
Broca's aphasia, also called motor aphasia, results from damage to the front portion or frontal lobe of the language-dominant area of the brain.
One newly recognized type of aphasia, subcortical aphasia, mimics the symptoms of other traditional types of aphasia but involves language disorders that are not typical.
This type of aphasia is associated with injuries to areas of the brain typically not identified with language and language processing.
www.healthatoz.com /healthatoz/Atoz/ency/aphasia.jsp   (2240 words)

  
 Post-stroke aphasia
According to Western Aphasia Battery (Kertesz 1982) aphasia is classified as non-fluent aphasias, including global, Broca’s, isolation and transcortical motor aphasias, and as fluent aphasias, including Wernicke’s, transcortical sensory, conduction and anomic aphasias.
Among the aphasia types global aphasia has the poorest prognosis, Broca’s aphasics often recovering towards anomic aphasia, and Wernicke’s aphasics tending to recover towards anomic or conduction aphasias.
Anomic aphasia is a common endstage in the evolutionary process of both fluent and non-fluent aphasias.
herkules.oulu.fi /isbn9514254279/html/x343.html   (714 words)

  
 Free-Essays.us - Aphasia
Aphasia is the impairment of spoken or written language caused by injury to the brain.
Aphasia is usually the result of a brain tumor, lesion, stroke, or severe blow to the head.
Unlike Broca's Aphasia, tough, patients with mixed non-fluent Aphasia are limited in their understanding of speech and cannot read or write much beyond an elementary level.
www.free-essays.us /dbase/c3/vrk20.shtml   (825 words)

  
 Aphasia
Aphasia is a communication disorder caused by damage to one or more regions of the brain that control language skills.
The primary treatment for aphasia is speech-language therapy that focuses on relearning and practicing language skills and using alternative or complementary communication methods.
Aphasia may also be caused by a severe head injury, a brain tumor or an infection.
edition.cnn.com /HEALTH/library/DS/00685.html   (1412 words)

  
 Aphasia: Signs and symptoms - MayoClinic.com
The language problems of aphasia can be understood as deficits in saying or writing something (expressive language) or in comprehending either spoken or written communication (receptive language).
Your doctor may refer to one of three broad categories of aphasia (nonfluent, fluent and global) that describe what region of the brain was damaged and how communication is usually affected.
Wernicke's aphasia is the result of damage to the language network in the middle left side of the brain.
www.mayoclinic.com /health/aphasia/DS00685/DSECTION=2   (392 words)

  
 USNews.com: Stroke rehabilitation (10/10/05)
The most severe form of aphasia, global aphasia, is caused by extensive damage to several areas involved in language function.
People with global aphasia lose nearly all their linguistic abilities; they can neither understand language nor use it to convey thought.
People with anomic aphasia may simply selectively forget interrelated groups of words, such as the names of people or particular kinds of objects.
www.usnews.com /usnews/health/articles/051010/rehab.dis.aphasia.htm   (250 words)

  
 THE MERCK MANUAL, Sec. 14, Ch. 169, Function And Dysfunction Of The Cerebral Lobes
Large frontal-temporal lesions cause global aphasia with severe defects in comprehension and expression.
Wernicke's aphasia indicates an abnormality of the posterolateral left temporal and inferior parietal language region.
Recovery from aphasia depends on several factors, including the size and location of lesions, the degree of language impairment, and, to a lesser degree, age, education, and systemic health.
www.merck.com /pubs/mmanual/section14/chapter169/169b.htm   (518 words)

  
 Aphasia: Complications - MayoClinic.com
Aphasia can create psychological and interpersonal complications for the affected individual, as well as for family and friends.
People with aphasia may be aware of their limitations for communicating.
The challenges of aphasia require patience and often change the nature of relationships.
www.mayoclinic.com /health/aphasia/DS00685/DSECTION=6   (249 words)

  
 Medical Dictionary: Global aphasia - WrongDiagnosis.com
Global aphasia: Type of or association with medical condition Aphasia.
Global aphasia: Global aphasia is listed as a type of (or associated with) the following medical conditions in our database: Aphasia
Aphasia: Aphasia is a neurological disorder caused by damage to the portions of the brain that are responsible for language.
www.wrongdiagnosis.com /medical/global_aphasia.htm   (215 words)

  
 Global aphasia without hemiparesis: language profiles and lesion distribution -- Hanlon et al. 66 (3): 365 -- Journal ...
Global aphasia without hemiparesis (GAWH) is an unusual stroke syndrome of particular interest to both aphasiologists and
The WAB aphasia quotient (AQ) and subscales of fluency, comprehension,
The incidence of aphasia and global aphasia in left brain-damaged patients.
jnnp.bmjjournals.com /cgi/content/full/66/3/365   (2547 words)

  
 Global Aphasia
Global aphasia is characterized by the complete loss of the ability to comprehend spoken or written language, as well as express language verbally or orthographically.
The lesion which typically causes a global aphasia involves the whole perisylvian region in the dominant hemisphere.
Recovery from global aphasia follows several possible evolutionary trends when present.
www.people.virginia.edu /~jpd3n/global.html   (212 words)

  
 Aphasia Communication Disorder   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-24)
Of the three main aphasias, global is the most severe form.
Global aphasia patients understand little or no spoken language and can only speak a few simple words.
Aphasia is non-discriminatory and can affect persons of any age, sex, race or nationality.
www.dcmilitary.com /navy/journal/8_24/health/23664-1.html   (829 words)

  
 Aphasia
You should speak to your physician or make an appointment to be seen if you have questions or concerns about this information or your medical condition.
Generally, aphasia can be divided into four broad categories: (1) Expressive aphasia involves difficulty in conveying thoughts through speech or writing.
(4) Global aphasia results from severe and extensive damage to the language areas of the brain.
www.med.umich.edu /1libr/aha/umaphasia.htm   (466 words)

  
 Aphasia symptoms, causes, diagnosis, and treatment on MedicineNet.com
Aphasia usually occurs suddenly, often as the result of a stroke or head injury, but it may also develop slowly, as in the case of a brain tumor.
A stroke is the sudden death of brain cells due to a problem with the blood supply.
Aphasia - Aphasia is a language disorder that results from damage to the brain.
www.medicinenet.com /aphasia/article.htm   (533 words)

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