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Topic: Glottal stop


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  Glottal stop - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-21)
The glottal stop is the sound made when the vocal cords are pressed together, and is the sound in the middle (and at the start if sentence-initial) of the interjection uh-oh, or the sound made by pronouncing "nope!" without stressing the p.
In Dutch, the glottal stop is not phonemic, but it is inserted in multi-morphemic words before morphemes that begin with a vowel, for example beamen ("to endorse"), where the glottal stop is inserted after the prefix "be-".
In casual speech, however, the glottal stop is not used much, and all these cases may equally well be rendered with different degrees and placements of stress.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Glottal_stop   (1032 words)

  
 Glottal consonant - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-21)
Glottal consonants are consonants articulated with the glottis.
However, the glottal stop at least behaves as a typical consonant in languages such as Tsou.
Often all vocalic onsets are preceded by a glottal stop, for example in German.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Glottal_consonant   (214 words)

  
 Glottal stop - RecipeFacts   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-21)
Finally, there are loanwords into English, usually from languages where the glottal stop is a phoneme, where a glottal stop is part of the accepted pronunciation, for example Hawai‘ian ‘a‘a.
The function of the glottal stop in Danish may be compared to the function of the two kinds of stress in Swedish and Norwegian.
A glottal stop often occurs between repeated vowels (for example Hawai‘i), but as the example ‘okina indicates, this is not the only place where a glottal stop may occur.
www.recipeland.com /encyclopaedia/index.php/Glottal_stop   (1014 words)

  
 Comments on Lesley Milroy, "Variation as an Interactional Resource"
I would be willing to accept that the glottal stop does delimit the end of a turn in some way, but not as a speaker-change signal, since by the time the last segment in the last word has been pronounced, it's already too late for any hearer to act on such a signal.
Not only are the young women using more glottal stop than the rest of the population, but there is a significant difference in the use of glottal stop among the young women between the working and middle class.
One might expect, if the use of glottal stop is spreading from medial to prepausal position, that there would be a constant relation across the population between the frequency of use of glottal stop in the two positions.
www.binghamton.edu /language-culture/reviews/symposium4/eckert.html   (1260 words)

  
 Glottal stop   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-21)
The glottal stop or voiceless glottal plosive is a type of consonantal sound, used in some spoken languages.
Cockney, glottal stop is also an allophone of /t/ in medial position, such as in the word bottle orfatter.
In German and Dutch,glottal stop is not phonemic, but it is inserted in multi- morphemic words beforemorphemes that begin with a vowel, such as German Beamter (="civil servant") or Dutch beamen (="to endorse"),where the glottal stop is inserted after the prefix "be-".
www.therfcc.org /glottal-stop-56814.html   (337 words)

  
 A be'er bi' a bu'er - attitudes towards the glottal stop in Modern Day Britain
The glottal stop may be used in a variety of ways: word-finally, as in i' for it, pre-consonantally, as in bulle' proof for bullet-proof or as a word-internal, intervocalic glottal stop as in glo'al for glottal.
The use of the glottal stop as a replacement for /t/ is often reported as being heavily stigmatised in Britain (Coggle: 42), despite the fact that it occurs in several accents/dialects in Britain such as Cockney and Glaswegian.
With the increase of regional accents in the public domain, the spread of EE and the increased use of the glottal stop in final positions in RP, the glottal stop is losing its stigma.
www.eng.umu.se /borders/grupp1/marie/Linguisticsessay.htm   (1222 words)

  
 Glottal stop
In phonetics, the glottal stop is a guttural sound that is made when the glottal folds are pressed together.
In most languages it precedes an initial vowel and usually is not rendered in writing in such cases.
Other examples of language using phonemic glottal stop are Nahuatl and many other Native American languages, Samoan[?], Hebrew, and Arabic.
www.ebroadcast.com.au /lookup/encyclopedia/gl/Glottal_stop.html   (176 words)

  
 Conference Materials   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-21)
A glottal stop is expected to be more frequent in content than function words, partly since function words are mostly unaccented.
Glottal stops are more common in read than spontaneous speech, and the absence of any glottal reflex is more frequent in spontaneous than read speech.
Glottalization without a glottal stop is more frequent in spontaneous than read speech.
cognet.mit.edu /library/conferences/paper?paper_id=48881   (339 words)

  
 L-C Symposium 4
Glottalization is one of the features that John Wells had in mind when he remarked that `mainstream RP is now the subject of imminent invasion by trends spreading from working class urban speech, particularly that of London' (1982: 106).
Glottalization - especially the glottal stop - is a prominent characteristic of London vernacular, and in Britain generally it tends to be associated with urban dialects.
Table 6, the glottalized variants turn up most frequently in the conversation with L, but in the conversation with her brother K's pattern of PPC application is comparable to that of other informants: just 4 out of 34 (11.8%) of the pre-pausal and turn-final tokens are glottalised.
www.binghamton.edu /language-culture/symposia/4   (3859 words)

  
 Encyclopedia article on Glottal stop [EncycloZine]   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-21)
Finally, there are loanwords into English, usually from languages where the glottal stop is a phoneme, where a glottal stop is part of the accepted pronunciation, e.g.
Danish has the glottal stop as a suprasegmental feature, though it is seldom indicated by the orthography; only the consonant clusters 'nd' and 'ld' indicate glottal stop, e.g.
In Dutch, the glottal stop is not phonemic, but it is inserted in multi-morphemic words before morphemes that begin with a vowel, e.g.
encyclozine.com /Glottal_stop   (756 words)

  
 Phonetic cues (intuit) 12
In isolation, a word cannot begin with a vowel; it must be preceded by a "glottal stop".
Glottal stop is the speech sound we insert before "aim" when we say: "I said 'an aim', not 'a name'".
In connected speech, the preceding word is usually run into the word-initial vowel, and the glottal stop is omitted.
www.tau.ac.il /~tsurxx/Rozik_MP3_files_(intuit)/phonetic_12_folder/Phonetic_cues_(intuit)_110.html   (374 words)

  
 Far Outliers   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-21)
A glottal stop is implicit between any two adjacent vowels in a word, as in gaar 'to say', which has two syllables with a glottal stop in between.
In the new orthography, however, the glottal stop is everywhere spelled with a q, and resistance to the new orthography centers on "that damn q" in new spellings like Waqab 'Yap', girdiiq 'people', qarcheaq 'bird, bat', and even Qapriil 'April' and Qaawguust 'August'.
The decision to use q in place of the apostrophe for glottal stop was motivated by the fact that the apostrophe was already used to indicate a glottalized release on consonants.
faroutliers.blogspot.com /2004/08/yapese-spelling-reform-that-damn-q.html   (576 words)

  
 glottal stop --  Encyclopædia Britannica
The glottal stop is not a separate phoneme (or distinctive sound) in English, though it is one of the allophones of the t phoneme in some…
The glottal stop is not a separate phoneme (or distinctive sound) in English, though it is one of the allophones of the t phoneme in...
A completely articulated stop usually has three stages: the catch (implosion), or beginning of the blockage; the hold (occlusion); and the release (explosion), or opening of the air passage again.
www.britannica.com /eb/article-9037062   (796 words)

  
 Lesson 2
Glottalization with liquids is written as glottal stop plus liquid, since you hear the glottal closure before the liquid sound.
Glottalization is written after the stop consonant, since you hear the release of the glottal stop after the stop consonant.
At the beginning and middle of a word: Glottalization is written after the fricative consonant, since you hear the release of the glottal stop after it.
www.chumashlanguage.com /lesson-02/less-02-3-tx.html   (469 words)

  
 [No title]   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-21)
If a glottal stop is present in the UR of 2a, this form should then prime 2c.
If a glottal stop is not present in the UR of 2a, participants primed with 2b should recognize 2a faster than 2d because there would be exposure to one less segment, causing processing time to be shorter.
If a glottal stop is not present in the UR of 2a, there should be no difference in reaction times for 2c or 2d when primed with 2a.
www.ling.upenn.edu /Events/PLC/plc25/schedule/sumner.txt   (723 words)

  
 Word-initial glottal stops   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-21)
The glottal stop is part of the consonant inventory of Arabic, and is particularly common in Cairene because the historical uvular stop qaf is realized as a glottal stop.
Word-initial glottal stops are predictable in Arabic; they occur, just as they do in English and many other languages, when the word starts with a vowel, except in ``weak'' environments that are also predictable.
Because only a word-initial unit will be selected for a word-initial context in synthesis, a glottal stop is never inappropriately generated in a prevocalic context, and this binding reduces the size of the unit database.
www.cs.cmu.edu /~awb/papers/eurospeech2003/arabic/node17.html   (140 words)

  
 H2G2   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-21)
The aperture at the top of the vocal chords is called the glottis and when it closes tight the chords stop vibrating, creating a brief silence, then a slight choke or cough-like explosive sound upon release.
The glottal stop does function as a phoneme in its own right in numerous other languages around the world, though, including Arabic and many African and American-Indian languages.
Glottalisation in the UK The glottal stop is not considered a separate phoneme of RP English [Standard British English pronunciation.
www.bbc.co.uk /dna/h2g2/pda/A1002808?s_id=1&s_split=2   (195 words)

  
 Glottal Stop : PDXBooks
The glottal stop in the received pronunciation of English: An attempt at an acoustic analysis of the sequences -tl-, -tr-, -tn-, -tj-, and -tw- (Årbok - Universitetet i Bergen)
Glottal stop in Nenets (Mémoires de la Société finno-ougrienne)
Karlgren's glottal stop initial in ancient Chinese,: With particular reference to the hPhags-pa alphabet and to certain points of linguistic psychology
pdxbooks.com /title/Glottal-Stop   (59 words)

  
 Language Log: Subtle Distinctions
These sentences differ only in the presence or absence of a glottal stop at the beginning of the verb.
This glottal stop is the unspecified object marker.
There's no glottal stop at the beginning, but there is an [h] at the end.
itre.cis.upenn.edu /~myl/languagelog/archives/001802.html   (277 words)

  
 Encyclopedia: Glottal stop   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-21)
The International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA) is a system of phonetic notation devised by linguists to accurately and uniquely represent each of the wide variety of sounds (phones or phonemes) used in spoken human language.
An interjection, sometimes called a filled pause, is a part of speech that usually has no grammatical connection to the rest of the sentence and simply expresses emotion on the part of the speaker, although most interjections have clear definitions.
A German language example of the glottal stop is "Beamter".
www.nationmaster.com /encyclopedia/Glottal-stop   (512 words)

  
 Contextual Summaries of Selected Publications of Martin Rothenberg [rev
This shape of a typical glottal airflow waveform was characterized by a gradual flow onset and a sharp cessation of flow that generated much more second and third formant energy than predicted by the then-current glottal flow models published by Flanagan.
This shaping of the glottal flow pulse was discussed in the paper, and possibility of source-tract acoustic interaction included as a causative factor (in addition to adding first formant oscillations to the waveform as some of the formant energy was absorbed by the glottis during the open phase of the cycle).
The general conclusion for breathy voicing is that the acoustic inertance near the glottis acts as a low pass filter for the glottal source function, reducing the proportion of energy at the second and higher formant frequencies, as compared to the increase in the proportion of higher formant energy in non-breathy voicing.
www.rothenberg.org /summaries.htm   (6230 words)

  
 Table of the consonants   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-21)
the glottal stop is not a Danovën letter in itself, but is pronounced between the vowels of any two adjacent words and between identical vowels (e.g.
the use of the glottal stop in this position is now being shared with the experimental "syntactic phoneme" ð; the ð is used between "incompatible vowels" (see the Vowels page), while the glottal stop is used between compatible vowels where they do not belong to the same word, e.g.
The glottal stop is also pronounced in place of a t when that t is alone at the end of a word (i.e.
www.geocities.com /Athens/Crete/5555/cons.htm   (290 words)

  
 Verb Conjugation Continued / Clarified
Glottal stops that occur medially (in the middle of a word) between a vowel and a consonant are represented by a hyphen (-) to avoid mispronunciation.
A glottal stop is named as such because the sound is produce by an area of the throat called the glottis.
A glottal stop is produced when this area is abruptly and tightly closed… stopping the air coming from the lungs.
www2.seasite.niu.edu /tagalogdiscuss/_disc2/0000175a.htm   (1124 words)

  
 Phonetic Transcription Workshop
The stop consonants are distinguished by what part of your mouth you use to block the air.
The unvoiced alveolar stop is the initial consonant of till.
They begin as stops and slide into fricatives, and hence are represented as a stop followed by a fricative.
www.uta.edu /english/tim/courses/4301f98/2sept.html   (1750 words)

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