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Topic: Goidelic languages


In the News (Wed 21 Aug 19)

  
  Goidelic
Goidelic is one of two major divisions of modern-day Celtic languages (the other being Brythonic).
Goidelic languages were once restricted to Ireland, but in the 6th century Irish colonists and invaders began migrating to Scotland and slowly pushed out the Brythonic language found there.
Goidelic languages were once common on the western edge of Celtic Europe; there is also evidence that they were spoken in the region of Galicia in Spain.
www.ebroadcast.com.au /lookup/encyclopedia/go/Goidelic_languages.html   (155 words)

  
  Goidelic languages - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Manx, the former common language of the Isle of Man, is closely akin to the Gaelic spoken in north east Ireland and the now extinct Gaelic of Galloway (in southwest Scotland), with heavy influence from Old Norse because of the Viking invasions.
Goidelic languages may once have been common on the Atlantic coast of Europe and there is evidence that they were spoken in the region of Galicia in modern Spain and Portugal, around Marseille, at the head waters of the Seine, in the Celtic heartlands of Switzerland, Austria and so on, and in Galatia.
Middle Irish, the ancestor of the modern Goidelic languages, is the name for the language as used from the 10th to the 16th century.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Goidelic   (1665 words)

  
 Wikipedia: Goidelic
Goidelic is one of two major divisions of modern-day Celtic languages (the other being Brythonic).
Goidelic languages were once restricted to Ireland, but in the 6th century Irish colonists and invaders began migrating to Scotland and eventually assimilated the Brythonic language found there.
Goidelic languages were once common on the western edge of Celtic Europe; there is also evidence that they were spoken in the region of Galicia in Spain.
www.factbook.org /wikipedia/en/g/go/goidelic.html   (349 words)

  
 Gaelic / Goidelic - Language Directory
Goidelic languages were once restricted to Ireland, but in the 6th century Irish colonists and invaders began migrating to Scotland and eventually assimilated the Brythonic language speakers who lived there.
Manx, the former common language of the Isle of Man, is descended from the Gaelic spoken in north east Ireland and the now extinct Gaelic of Galloway (Scotland), with heavy influence from Old Norse because of the Viking invasions.
Goidelic languages may once have been common on the Atlanic coast of Europe and there is some evidence that they were spoken in the region of Galicia in modern Spain.
language-directory.50webs.com /languages/gaelic.htm   (361 words)

  
 Manx language - Encyclopedia, History, Geography and Biography
The language sharply declined during the 19th century and was supplanted by English.
Like all modern Celtic languages, Manx shows initial consonant mutations, which are processes by which the initial consonant of a word is altered according to its morphological and/or syntactic environment.
In the late spoken language of the 20th century the system was breaking down, with speakers frequently failing to use lenition in environments where it was called for, and occasionally using it in environments where it was not called for.
www.arikah.net /encyclopedia/Manx_language   (947 words)

  
 Goidelic languages FACTS AND INFORMATION   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-17)
Goidelic languages were once restricted to, but sometime between the and the a group of the Irish Celts known to the Romans as ''Scoti'' began migrating from Ireland to what is now Scotland and eventually assimilated the (a group of peoples who may have originally spoken a Brythonic language) who lived there.
Goidelic languages may once have been common on the Atlantic coast of Europe and there is evidence that they were spoken in the region of Galicia in modern and Portugal, around Marseille, at the head waters of the Seine, in the Celtic heartlands of Switzerland, Austria and so on, and in.
Middle Irish, the ancestor of the modern Goidelic languages, is the name for the language as used from the 10th to the.
www.webguidelive.com /en/Goidelic_languages   (1524 words)

  
 Goidelic   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-17)
The three Goidelic languages to survive into modern times are Irish Gaelic, Scots Gaelic, and Manx.
Goidelic languages were once restricted to Ireland, but in the 6th century Irish colonists and invaders began migrating to Scotland and slowly pushed out the Brythonic language found there.
Manx is in turn an offshoot of Scottish Gaelic, with heavy influence from Norse from the time the Isle of Man was controlled by Viking Scandinavians.
www.icyclopedia.com /encyclopedia/g/go/goidelic.html   (326 words)

  
 Breton language - Simple English Wikipedia
Breton (Brezhoneg, in Breton) is a Celtic language spoken in Brittany, in the north-west of France.
It is closely related to the Cornish language of Cornwall in the south-west of England and Welsh.
It is less closely related to the Goidelic languages of Scotland, Ireland and the Isle of Man.
simple.wikipedia.org /wiki/Breton_language   (120 words)

  
 Scottish Gaelic language - Encyclopedia, History, Geography and Biography   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-17)
Gaelic, a descendent of the Goidelic branch of Celtic and closely related to Irish, is the traditional language of the Scotti or Gaels, and the historical language of the majority of Scotland.
The Gaelic language eventually displaced Pictish north of the Forth, and until the late 15th century it was known in Inglis as Scottis.
The BBC also operates a Gaelic language radio station Radio nan Gaidheal (which regularly transmits joint broadcasts with its Republic of Ireland counterpart Raidió na Gaeltachta), and there are also television programmes in the language on the BBC and on the independent commercial channels, usually subtitled in English.
www.arikah.net /encyclopedia/Scottish_Gaelic   (4292 words)

  
 Wikipedia: Goidelic languages - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Manx, the former common language of the Isle of Man, is closely akin to the Gaelic spoken in north east Ireland and the now extinct Gaelic of Galloway (in southwest Scotland), with heavy influence from Old Norse because of the Viking invasions.
Middle Irish, the ancestor of the modern Goidelic languages, is the name for the language as used from the 10th to the 16th century.
Ireland's national language is the 21st to be given such recognition by the EU and previously had the status of a treaty language.
en.pediax.org /Goidelic_languages   (1719 words)

  
 goidelic - Article and Reference from OnPedia.com
Before the 12th century Scottish Gaelic was Scotland's major language, but the introduction of the Germanic Scots language and the English language reversed that, restricting Gaelic speakers to the Highlands.
The culturally repressive measures taken against the rebellious highland communities by the British crown following the Culloden Rebellion of 1746 caused a further decline in the language's use.
However today more and more people are learning the language, and the Scottish Parliament has afforded the language some official status, sparking hopes that Scottish Gaelic can be saved from extinction and revived to a certain degree.
www.onpedia.com /encyclopedia/Goidelic   (860 words)

  
 Iregua: Web de cultura y música celta
Celtic Languages stem from the Indo-European family of languages, and six of the main Celtic languages survived to the modern period.
Goidelic languages include Scottish Gaelic (spoken in the Scottish highlands and Isles), Irish (spoken in Ireland) and Manx Gaelic (once spoken on the Isle of Manx), and are therefore closely related to each other.
The Official Languages (Equality) Bill 2002 is currently on its second reading in the Irish Seanad with the purported aim to "promote equality of status and equal rights and privileges as to their use..." (of the English and Irish languages).
www.iregua.net /cultura/imleyes/elunedm2.htm   (2166 words)

  
 Scottish language - Simple English Wikipedia
The Scottish language (Gàidhlig) (often commonly referred to simply as Gaelic in English) is a sister language of Irish and Manx; all three are Goidelic languages and part of the Celtic language family.
It is also related to the Welsh language, Cornish language and the Breton language (these three are Brittonic or Brythonic languages).
In past times, the language was spoken across all of Scotland, except for the Northern Islands (Orkney and Shetland).
simple.wikipedia.org /wiki/Scottish_language   (196 words)

  
 European Languages
You may have noticed that a few languages spoken on the European continent are not included in the Indo-European family of languages.
The western languages generally use /s/ as a plural marker, though it is silent in spoken French, while the eastern languages use vowels.
The Slavic languages are spoken in Eastern Europe and Russia and are the harder of the three language groups analyzed to learn.
www.ielanguages.com /eurolang.html   (1535 words)

  
 Irish language - Facts, Information, and Encyclopedia Reference article
Irish (Gaeilge), a Goidelic language spoken in the Republic of Ireland, the United Kingdom and the USA, is constitutionally recognised as the first official language of the Republic of Ireland.
Irish is given recognition by the Constitution of Ireland as the first official language of the Republic of Ireland (with English being a second official language), despite the limited distribution of fluency among the population of that country.
As a treaty language of the European Union, the highest-level documents of the EU are translated into Irish; in addition, the language has also recently received a degree of formal recognition in Northern Ireland from the United Kingdom, under the Good Friday Agreement.
www.startsurfing.com /encyclopedia/i/r/i/Irish_language.html   (5590 words)

  
 Goidelic languages - Free net encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-17)
Goidelic languages may once have been common on the Atlantic coast of Europe and there is evidence that they were spoken in the region of Galicia in modern Spain and Portugal, around Marseille, at the head waters of the Seine, in the Celtic heartlands of Switzerland, Austria and so on, and in Galatia.
The Goidelic languages had their own unique script, known as ogham, in use from at least the 5th century until the 15th, especially for carving on wood or stone.
A form of Middle Irish was used as a literary language in Ireland and Scotland until the 17th century, and often in both countries well into the 18th century; the Ethnologue gives the name "Hiberno-Scottish Gaelic" to this purely written language.
www.netipedia.com /index.php/Q-Celtic   (1642 words)

  
 Gaelic - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Gaelic as an adjective means "pertaining to the Gaels", whether to their language or their culture.
As a noun, it may refer to the group of languages (originally) spoken by the Gaels, or to any one of the individual languages.
Shelta is sometimes counted as a Gaelic or Goidelic language; however, while it is closely associated with Irish Gaelic it is not genetically related, being instead a cant which has borrowed a great volume of Irish vocabulary.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Gaelic   (208 words)

  
 Goidelic languages: Facts and details from Encyclopedia Topic   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-17)
The Goidelic languages had their own unique script, known as ogham Ogham (old irish ogam) was an alphabet used primarily to represent gaelic languages that was probably often written in wood in early times....
Goidelic languages The goidelic languages are one of two major divisions of modern-day celtic languages (the other being the brythonic languages)....
Noric language Noric language was the ancient celtic language spoken in the roman province of noricum....
www.absoluteastronomy.com /g/goidelic_languages   (1930 words)

  
 CRC   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-17)
The Manx language (Gailck) is one of the Goidelic Celtic languages, sharing a common ancestry with Irish (Gaeilge) and Scottish (Gaedhlig).
It Is generally accepted that the Goidelic languages are "older" in the sense that they preserve features that the Brythonic have dropped, being therefore a closer match to an original Common Celtic tongue.
The language "grew up" in isolation during the majority of the last 500 years, separated from the common Gaelic poetic and prosaic heritage and the literary styles accompanying them on the one hand, and isolated first by legislation, and later by orthography and (to an extent) grammar and vocabulary from its cousins, Gaeilge and Gaedhlig.
www.univie.ac.at /keltologie/CRC/CRCGailck.html   (2182 words)

  
 Goidelic languages - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The Goidelic languages (also sometimes called the Gaelic languages or collectively Gaelic) have historically been part of a dialect continuum stretching from the south of Ireland, the Isle of Man, to the north of Scotland.
Irish is one of Ireland's two official languages (along with English) and is still fairly widely spoken in the south, west, and northwest of Ireland.
Before the Irish potato famine of the 1840s, the language was spoken by the vast majority of the population, but the famine and emigration, as well as an implication by the English ruling classes that Irish was for the ignorant, led to a decline which has begun to reverse only very recently.
domainhelp.search.com /reference/Goidelic_languages   (1897 words)

  
 Talk:Scottish Gaelic language - Biocrawler   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-17)
I think the convention is that all languages end in "language", so it would be Scots Gaelic language.
Maybe one should be moved to Goidelic languages.
Since it only appears now in the westernmost and easternmost Indoeuropean languages (the extremities of the Indoeuropean sprachbund), this suggests that it occurred in Proto Indoeuropean but was lost in the centre where the languages have changed most.
www.biocrawler.com /encyclopedia/Talk:Scottish_Gaelic_language   (1761 words)

  
 Qwika - similar:Picts
Goidelic Gaelic Geographic distribution: Ireland, Scotland, Isle of Man Genetic classification: Indo-European Celtic Insular Celtic Goidelic Subdivisions: Irish Scottish Gaelic Manx The Goidelic languages (also sometimes called the Gaelic languages or collectively Gaelic) are one of two major divisions of modern-day Insular Celtic langu...
A language, "B" (brought, for example, with migrations of population) arrives in the territory.
The Germanic substrate hypothesis is an attempt to explain the distinctive nature of the Germanic languages within the context of the Indo-European language family.
www.qwika.com /rels/Talk:Picts   (1501 words)

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