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Topic: Gospel of Barnabas


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In the News (Sat 20 Apr 19)

  
  R. Blackhirst, "Barnabas and the Gospels: Was there an Early Gospel of Barnabas?"
Barnabas' traditional role in preserving and transmitting Matthew's gospel -- the "Jewish gospel," written in Palestine, in a native tongue - is surely relevant to the claims of the medieval Gospel of Barnabas which purports to be the long-lost testament of the Jewish Jesus.
If the name Barnabas is taken to mean Son of the Prophets, then it squares perfectly with this important aspect of the content of the medieval Gospel; Barnabas, Son of the Prophets, delivers a gospel in which the Sons of the Prophets are the heroes.
The medieval Barnabas invokes the primitive hermits of Mount Carmel, the Sons of the Prophets.
www.atheistalliance.org /jhc/articles/Blackhirst_Barnabas.htm   (8451 words)

  
  Gospel of Barnabas - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The Gospel of Barnabas is a work purporting to be a depiction of the life of Jesus by his disciple Barnabas.
Of this Gospel the Moriscoes in Africa have a translation in Spanish; and there is in the library of Prince Eugene of Savoy, a manuscript of some antiquity, containing an Italian translation of the same Gospel, made, it is to be supposed, for the use of renegades.
However, while there are many passages where the Gospel of Barnabas sets out alternative readings to parallel pericopes found in the canonical gospels, none of the references to Muhammad by name occurs in such a synoptic passage; and in particular, none of the "Muhammad" references in Barnabas corresponds to a "Paraclete" reference in canonical John.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Gospel_of_Barnabas   (5526 words)

  
 Acts of Barnabas - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The text of the pseudepigraphical Acts of Barnabas claims to identify its author as "John Mark," the companion of Paul, as if writing an account of Barnabas, the Cypriot Jew who was a member of the earliest church at Jerusalem; through the services of Barnabas the convert Saul was welcomed into the apostolic community.
Three pseudepigraphical works are linked with the name of Barnabas: the Epistle of Barnabas, written between AD 70 and 135, this Acts and the medieval forgery Gospel of Barnabas.
The language and the ecclesiastical politics of Acts of Barnabas reveal it to be a work of the 5th century, designed to strengthen the claims of the church of Cyprus to apostolic foundation as the site of Barnabas' grave, and therefore of its bishops' independence from the patriarch of Antioch.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Acts_of_Barnabas   (368 words)

  
 R. Blackhirst, "Barnabas and the Gospels: Was there an Early Gospel of Barnabas?"
Barnabas' traditional role in preserving and transmitting Matthew's gospel -- the "Jewish gospel," written in Palestine, in a native tongue - is surely relevant to the claims of the medieval Gospel of Barnabas which purports to be the long-lost testament of the Jewish Jesus.
If the name Barnabas is taken to mean Son of the Prophets, then it squares perfectly with this important aspect of the content of the medieval Gospel; Barnabas, Son of the Prophets, delivers a gospel in which the Sons of the Prophets are the heroes.
The medieval Barnabas invokes the primitive hermits of Mount Carmel, the Sons of the Prophets.
www.depts.drew.edu /jhc/Blackhirst_Barnabas.html   (8398 words)

  
 Gospel of Barnabas
Barnabas was born in a Jewish family of Cyprus.
The author of one of the Gospels was the Apostle Barnabas.
These Gospels were written by followers of apostle Paul and names of famous people were put as authors to give credit and authenticity to these Gospels.
www.dawanet.com /nonmuslim/intro/scriptur/barnabas.html   (703 words)

  
 The Gospel of Barnabas
The Barnabas of this gospel rejects the deity of Christ.
This Gospel denounces the teaching of Paul regarding circumcision, the crucifixion, the death and resurrection of Jesus.
Thus it is illogical to accept that the Barnabas of the New Testament is responsible for a document that rejects the very teachings he proclaimed and defended.
islam.itl.org.uk /barnabas/writer.html   (1060 words)

  
 The "Gospel of Barnabas"   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-24)
Epistle of Barnabas, written between AD 70 and 135, and contains two parts: general advice on church affairs in the first part, and the second part answers the question on whether Christians need to observe Jewish food laws, etc. His answer was that these laws were symbolic in nature.
Gospel of Barnabas (I), rejected among a list of forgeries in the 6th century.
Gospel of Barnabas (II), Latin manuscript from Italy in the 16th century, translated into English by Lonsdale and Laura Rigg, published in 1907 by Clarendon Press, Oxford.
answering-islam.org.uk /Barnabas/gosep.html   (301 words)

  
 Christiniaty Under the Microscope   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-24)
Barnabas was born in a Jewish family of Cyprus.
The author of one of the Gospels was the Apostle Barnabas.
These Gospels were written by followers of apostle Paul and names of famous people were put as authors to give credit and authenticity to these Gospels.
themodernreligion.com /comparative/christ/christianity_barn_injeel.htm   (1149 words)

  
 Epistle of Barnabas
Since Barnabas 16:3 refers to the destruction of the temple, Barnabas must be written after 70 C.E. It must be written before its first undisputable use in Clement of Alexandria, ca.
Barnabas does not give enough indications to permit confident identification of either the teacher's location or the location to which he writes.
For example, the reference to gall and vinegar in Barnabas 7:3, 5 seems to preserve an early stage of tradition that influenced the formation of the passion narratives in the Gospel of Peter and the synoptic gospels.
www.earlychristianwritings.com /barnabas.html   (643 words)

  
 The Forgery of the Gospel of Barnabas
Barnabas was one of the disciples of Jesus.
The writer of the Gospel of Barnabas was not well versed in Biblical history nor in orthodox Muslim theology, but apparently he (or she) was very knowledgeable of European Medieval customs.
The Gospel of Barnabas is mentioned in Yusuf Ali’s translation of the Qur’an p.268,334 and Sahih Muslim volume 4 footnote 2468 p.1254.
www.muslimhope.com /ForgeryOfTheGospelOfBarnabas.htm   (1291 words)

  
 The Gospel of Barnabas - Index
The Gospel of Barnabas is an apocryphal gospel.
That is, it is a life of Jesus purportedly written by a first-hand observer that is at variance with the picture(s) presented in the Bible.
However, it is unique among apocrypha in that it is a Muslim gospel; that is, it presents Jesus as a human prophet, not the son of God, and as a forerunner of Muhammad.
www.sacred-texts.com /isl/gbar/index.htm   (696 words)

  
 Gospel of Barnabas
The Gospel of Barnabas is the only known surviving Gospel written by a disciple of Jesus, that is, by a man who spent most of his time in the actual company of Jesus during the three years in which he was delivering his message.
The Gospel of Barnabas was accepted as a canonical Gospel in the churches of Alexandria up until 325 A.D. It is known that it was being circulated in the first and second centuries after the birth of Jesus from the writing of Iraneus (130 -200 A.D.), who wrote in support of Divine Unity.
There is also a solitary fragment of a Greek version of the Gospel of Barnabas to be found in a museum in Athens, which is all that remains of a copy which was burnt.
members.fortunecity.com /christianfact/b_barna.htm   (1998 words)

  
 [No title]
GOB VERSUS SCIENCE Jesus is quoted as saying (GOB 167) that the body of man is composed of the four elements -- earth, air, fire, and water, and that, although a single stone cannot float in water, the whole earth is resting on the top of the water.
GOB 210 makes it explicit that there were two separate decrees, one that no one might call Jesus of Nazareth, the prophet of the Jews, either God or Son of God, and the second that no one might contend CONCERNING him, both on pain of death.
In GOB 42, Jesus declares himself to be the precursor of the Messiah, in language almost identical with the words of John Baptist in John 1:19-28.
www.cs.rutgers.edu /pub/soc.religion.christian/faq/gospel-barnabas   (5382 words)

  
 The Gospel of Barnabas
While the Gospel of Barnabas does indeed claim that it descended into the heart of Jesus (Barnabas, chapter 10), it does not specify that Jesus received God’s words precisely from a heavenly copy of the book.
This Gospel presents Jesus and his mission as being identical to that of John the Baptist in the role of forerunner to the Messiah, who is Muhammad (Barnabas, chapters 42-44 and 220).
In several passages this gospel openly suggests that Jesus is not the Messiah (Barnabas, chapters 42, 82, 83, 96, 97, 198, 206).
www.itl.org.uk /barnabas/conflict.html   (810 words)

  
 How the Gospel of Barnabas Survived
Some say that the Gospel of Barnabas was accepted as a Canonical Gospel in the Churches of Alexandria till 325 C.E. Iranaeus (130-200) wrote in support of pure monotheism and opposed Paul for injecting into Christianity doctrines of the pagan Roman religion and Platonic philosophy.
This shows that the Acts, but not Gospel, of Barnabas was in circulation in the first and second centuries of Christianity.
Joseph Barnabas was a Jew of the tribe of Levi and of the Island of Cyprus ‘who became one of the earliest Christian disciples at Jerusalem.
essenes.net /gbarnabas.htm   (728 words)

  
 Preface To The Gospel Of Barnabas   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-24)
In the light of the Christian rejection (of the Gospel of Barnabas as a genuine Gospel) the contention that this work is genuine can be validated only when a copy of it that antedates the mission of the Prophet has been discovered and brought to light - which thus far has not been possible.
The identification of the Italian "Barnabas" with a Gospel of Barnabas that is
Barnabas agreed with Paul that the new Christians need not be circumcised, etc. According to the Acts of the Apostles 15:39, Barnabas returned to his home country, Cyprus, after he left Paul.
www.arabicbible.com /islam/barnabas/preface.htm   (2636 words)

  
 The Gospel of Barnabas   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-24)
Conclusion: the Gospel of Barnabas makes basic mistakes about the language, history and geography of the Jewish world in the 1st century A.D. These types of mistakes cast doubt over the claim that it was written by Barnabas in the 1st century.
It therefore is reasonable to conclude that the Gospel of Barnabas was composed in the 14th century A.D. and not in the 1st century by a disciple of Jesus.
It is known that it (the Gospel of Barnabas) was being circulated in the first and second centuries after the birth of Jesus from the writings of Iranaeus (130-200 A.D.), who wrote in support of the Divine Unity.
answering-islam.org /Green/barnabas.htm   (5372 words)

  
 How the Gospel of Barnabas Survived
The Gospel of Barnabas was accepted as a Canonical Gospel in the Churches of Alexandria till 325 C.E. Iranaeus (130-200) wrote in support of pure monotheism and opposed Paul for injecting into Christianity doctrines of the pagan Roman religion and Platonic philosophy.
This shows that the Gospel of Barnabas was in circulation in the first and second centuries of Christianity.
In the fourth year of Emperor Zeno (478 C.E.), the remains of Barnabas were discovered and there was found on his breast a copy of the Gospel of Barnabas written by his own hand.
www.essene.com /Gospels/GospelOfBarnabas.htm   (504 words)

  
 What is the gospel of Barnabas?
The Gospel of Barnabas also says that Jesus was born when Pilate was governor (but history records Pilate becoming governor in A.D. 26 or 27).
The Gospel of Barnabas claims that Jesus did not die on the cross, as does the Koran in Sura 4:157.
Historians are unanimous that the Gospel of Barnabas was written in the 15th-16th century A.D., likely by Muslims seeking to discredit the Biblical message regarding Jesus.
www.gotquestions.org /gospel-of-Barnabas.html   (320 words)

  
 The Gospel of Barnabas
Barnabas' reputed tomb, was discovered in 488, is near the Monastery of St Barnabas, in the Cypriot city of Salamis, whose Christian community was founded by Paul and Barnabas.
On perusal it came to be the Gospel of Barnabas written in Aramaic, the language of Jesus Christ.
Paul is declaring in the strongest manner that the gospel he preaches is the one and only way to salvation, and that to preach another gospel is to nullify the death of Christ.
www.understanding-islam.com /related/text.asp?type=article&aid=174   (5988 words)

  
 What do we know about the 'Gospel of Barnabas'?   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-24)
Often there is confusion between the "Gospel" of Barnabas and the "Epistle" of Barnabas in writings of Muslim authors.
LC call number: BS2860.B4 S6 The 'Gospel of Barnabas' was translated into English by Lonsdale and Ragg from Italian scripts a long time ago and it is widely available.
LC call number: BS2860.B4 A3 The Gospel of Barnabas document is not accepted as being authentic by reputable historians.
answering-islam.org /Barnabas/index.html   (846 words)

  
 Gospel of Barnabas   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-24)
The Gospel of Barnabas is a fake work.
The epistle may or may not have been written by the Barnabas of Acts, but it is quoted by early church fathers like Clement of Alexandria, who about 170 AD, stated the epistle was authentic.
The Quran condemns eating pork but "Barnabas" says "that which entereth into the man defileth not the man, but that which cometh out of the man defileth the man" (32).
www.biblefacts.org /church/gosbarn.html   (257 words)

  
 The Gospel of Barnabas
He, in 1713, gave it to Prince Eugene of Savoy and over the next few years it passed from one hand to another until it reached Vienna in 1738 and was deposited in the Imperial Library where it stays to this day [2].
Between 1960 and 1980, translations of this gospel appeared in many of the languages of the Muslim majority countries.
Rahim, M A, "The Gospel of Barnabas" (Qur’an Council of Pakistan, Karachi, 1973)
islam.itl.org.uk /barnabas/background.html   (544 words)

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