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Topic: Gospel of Luke


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In the News (Fri 22 Jun 18)

  
  Gospel of Luke
Luke had not made full use of the Isaiah 6:9-10 passage in his Gospel, for that was the time of the first visitation of the prophet, and the rejection of that prophet was mitigated by the "ignorance" of the people.
This is not to suggest that Luke saw the preaching of Paul at Rome as being a one-off supernatural fulfillment of the commission, such that it would not have been in the works during the earlier evangelisation or that it could not have continued with other prophets.
Luke's emphasis is on the success of the Christian mission, not the demise of Paul.
www.earlychristianwritings.com /luke.html   (4717 words)

  
  USCCB - NAB - Luke - Introduction
No gospel writer is more concerned with the role of the Spirit in the life of Jesus and the Christian disciple (Luke 1:35, 41; 2:25-27; 4:1, 14, 18; 10:21; 11:13; 24:49), with the importance of prayer (Luke 3:21; 5:16; 6:12; 9:28; 11:1-13; 18:1-8), or with Jesus' concern for women (Luke 7:11-17, 36-50; 8:2-3; 10:38-42).
Early Christian tradition, from the late second century on, identifies the author of this gospel and of the Acts of the Apostles as Luke, a Syrian from Antioch, who is mentioned in the New Testament in Col 4:14, Philemon 24 and 2 Tim 4:11.
The prologue of the gospel makes it clear that Luke is not part of the first generation of Christian disciples but is himself dependent upon the traditions he received from those who were eyewitnesses and ministers of the word (Luke 1:2).
www.usccb.org /nab/bible/luke/intro.htm   (755 words)

  
  Search Results for "Gospel of Luke"
Luke, the Gospel According to In the New Testament, one of the four Gospels that record the life of Jesus.
...THE GOSPEL according to Luke was probably written not far from the year 70 A. It is quoted in the first half of the second century, and in a fragment dated about...
...to pass, on one of the days, as he was teaching the people in the temple, and preaching the gospel, 1 there came upon him the chief priests and the scribes with the...
www.bartleby.com /cgi-bin/texis/webinator/sitesearch?FILTER=&query=Gospel+of+Luke   (241 words)

  
  Gospel of Saint Luke
He quotes the Gospels just as any modern bishop would do, he calls them Scripture, believes even in their verbal inspiration; shows how congruous it is that there are four and only four Gospels; and says that Luke, who begins with the priesthood and sacrifice of Zachary, is the calf.
The Gospel was written, as is gathered from the prologue (i, 1-4), for the purpose of giving Theophilus (and others like him) increased confidence in the unshakable firmness of the Christian truths in which he had been instructed, or "catechized"--the latter word being used, according to Harnack, in its technical sense.
The Gospel of Luke preceded his Acts of the Apostles, and was therefore composed before the end of the Roman imprisonment, when the Acts was finished (Acts, xxviii, 30-31).
www.catholicity.com /encyclopedia/l/luke,gospel_of_st.html   (9140 words)

  
  Gospel of Luke
Gospel of Luke is the third of the four Gospels of the New Testament, which tells the story of Jesus Christ's life, death, and resurrection.
Although the text does not name its author, the traditional view is that it was written by Luke, a follower of Paul and also the author of the Acts of the Apostles.
Luke wrote for the "Hellenic world." This Gospel is indeed "rich and precious." "Out of a total of 1151 verses, Luke has 389 in common with Matthew and Mark, 176 in common with Matthew alone, 41 in common with Mark alone, leaving 544 peculiar to himself.
www.black-science.org /wikipedia/g/go/gospel_of_luke.html   (550 words)

  
  Gospel of Luke - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The Gospel of Luke is the third of the four canonical Gospels of the New Testament, which tell the story of Jesus' life, death, and resurrection.
The Gospel is clearly directed at Christians, or at those who already knew about Christianity, rather than a general audience, since the ascription goes on to state that the Gospel was written "...so that you may know the certainty of the things you have been taught" (Luke 1:3-4).
The earliest manuscripts of the Gospel of Luke are four papyrus fragments dating from the first half of the 3rd century [4], one containing portions of all four gospels (P
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Gospel_of_Luke   (1916 words)

  
 Gospel of Luke - Wikipedia
Gospel of Luke is the third of the four Gospels of the New Testament, which tells the story of Jesus Christ's life, death, and resurrection.
According to the two source hypothesis, which is the most commonly accepted theory among biblical scholars about the origin of the synoptic Gospels, Luke borrowed heavily from both the Mark and another, lost source known by scholars as Q.
Luke wrote for the "Hellenic world." This Gospel is indeed "rich and precious." "Out of a total of 1151 verses, Luke has 389 in common with Matthew and Mark, 176 in common with Matthew alone, 41 in common with Mark alone, leaving 544 peculiar to himself.
nostalgia.wikipedia.org /wiki/Luke   (614 words)

  
 from jesus to christ: the story of the storytellers: the gospel of luke
Luke wrote two works, the third gospel, an account of the life and teachings of Jesus, and the Book of Acts, which is an account of the growth and expansion of Christianity after the death of Jesus down through close to the end of the ministry of Paul.
Luke portrays Jesus in the gospel in essentially according to the image of the divine man. The person in whom divine powers are visible and are exercised, both in his teaching and in his miracle doing.
Luke is traditionally thought of as one of Paul's traveling companions and it's certainly the case that the author of Luke was from those Greek cities in which Paul had worked.
www.pbs.org /wgbh/pages/frontline/shows/religion/story/luke.html   (1852 words)

  
 The Gospel of Luke. An introduction for preachers
Luke tells us that he is not the first to do what he is doing: ‘Since many have undertaken to set down an orderly account of the events that have been fulfilled among us…’.
The body of research into the gospels certainly confirms this, the majority view being that one of Luke’s sources was Mark and another he would have shared with Matthew, which we call Q (the first letter of the German word for source, ‘Quelle’).
Luke also stations himself at some considerable distance from the events he reports: ‘just as they were handed on to us by those who from the beginning were eyewitnesses and servants of the word.’ He is not claiming to be an eyewitness, but is claiming that these stand behind his sources.
wwwstaff.murdoch.edu.au /~loader/Luke.htm   (3431 words)

  
 USCCB - NAB - Luke - Introduction
No gospel writer is more concerned with the role of the Spirit in the life of Jesus and the Christian disciple (Luke 1:35, 41; 2:25-27; 4:1, 14, 18; 10:21; 11:13; 24:49), with the importance of prayer (Luke 3:21; 5:16; 6:12; 9:28; 11:1-13; 18:1-8), or with Jesus' concern for women (Luke 7:11-17, 36-50; 8:2-3; 10:38-42).
The prologue of the gospel makes it clear that Luke is not part of the first generation of Christian disciples but is himself dependent upon the traditions he received from those who were eyewitnesses and ministers of the word (Luke 1:2).
Among the likely sources for the composition of this gospel (Luke 1:3) were the Gospel of Mark, a written collection of sayings of Jesus known also to the author of the Gospel of Matthew (Q; see Introduction to Matthew), and other special traditions that were used by Luke alone among the gospel writers.
www.nccbuscc.org /nab/bible/luke/intro.htm   (755 words)

  
 Gospel according to Luke
Gospel that has been included in the religious text of Christianity, the New Testament, and arranged as the third book.
Luke is the longest of the four gospels in the New Testament, and has a style and a vocabulary that is more evolved than what is found in Mark and Matthew (these three gospels are called synoptic, as they have many similarities in content).
Luke is also the gospel which first propagated the theories of tradition and legitimate succession, elements that would become central to the Roman Catholic Church and its organization
lexicorient.com /e.o/luke_g.htm   (457 words)

  
 The Gospel of Luke
Traditionally, Luke "the beloved physician" mentioned in one of Paul's undisputed letters (Phlm 24), and in two of the disputed letters (Col 4:14, where he is called "beloved physician" and 2 Tim 4:11)- assuming that all of these references are to the same Luke.
Luke is not necessarily opposed to wealth as much as he is concerned for complacency on the part of the wealthy, when they refuse to help the poor.
Luke expands this so that Jesus and his family and John the baptist and his family and the disciples also frequently worship God, thanking him or praising him for what is perceived as his involvement in their life.
faculty.cbhs.org /rmartin/contents/lukegospel8090.htm   (1879 words)

  
 CliffsNotes::The New Testament:Book Summary and Study Guide
The first paragraph in Luke’s gospel is especially informative to readers of the New Testament, for it describes the way in which the two narratives attributed to Luke came to be written.
Luke was a companion of Paul, and he was quite familiar with the different interpretations of the life of Jesus held by different groups within the Christian community.
Luke possessed rare ability as a writer, and it has often been said that his gospel is the most appealing of all those in the New Testament.
www.cliffsnotes.com /WileyCDA/LitNote/id-85,pageNum-32.html   (862 words)

  
 The Gospel According to Luke
Luke "portrayed Jesus as one who was not bound by the dividing lines that traditional Jews had erected against the poor, the lepers, the Samaritans, the women, or the gentiles.
Luke consciously imitated the style of the Septuagint (the Greek translation of the Torah) and his gospel (in Greek) is the only one of the synoptics that can be readily and idiomatically translated back into Hebrew.
"The Gospel of Luke was written to illumine the Torah with occasional references to the prophets and the psalms, with a bow to the liturgical year of the Jews and with an attempt to harmonize the texts of Mark and Matthew.
www.mystae.com /restricted/reflections/messiah/luke.html   (4946 words)

  
 Gospel according to Luke   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Gospel that has been included in the religious text of Christianity, the New Testament, and arranged as the third book.
Luke is the longest of the four gospels in the New Testament, and has a style and a vocabulary that is more evolved than what is found in Mark and Matthew (these three gospels are called synoptic, as they have many similarities in content).
Luke is also the gospel which first propagated the theories of tradition and legitimate succession, elements that would become central to the Roman Catholic Church and its organization
i-cias.com /e.o/luke_g.htm   (457 words)

  
 Gospel Of Luke
Luke was a doctor and probably well educated according to the style of writing and structure of his text.
The Gospel of Luke is specifically addressed to an individual named Theophilus and is focused on the complete story and history of Jesus Christ from His birth and ministry to His crucifixion and resurrection.
Bible scholars generally agree that the Gospel of Luke was written between 59 and 70 A.D. The author is referenced in Colossians 4:14 by the Apostle Paul.
www.allaboutjesuschrist.org /gospel-of-luke.htm   (761 words)

  
 Jesus Family Tomb: Gospel of Luke & The Jesus Tomb Discovery
The Gospel of Luke is one of the four canonical Gospels found in the New Testament Bible along with the Gospel of Matthew, Mark, and John.
The Gospel of Luke is the third and longest Gospel of the four, and relates the story of the life, death, and resurrection of Jesus.
The Gospel of Luke and the Gospel of Matthew are the only biblical sources in which the genealogy of Jesus can be found, and some have turned to these sources to answer questions regarding the historical family of Jesus, and whether Jesus himself had brothers, and who those brothers could be.
www.jesusfamilytomb.com /holy_books/new_testament/gospel_luke.html   (423 words)

  
 Daily Scripture Readings and Meditations
These readings are intended as an aid for daily prayer and meditation.
The selection of gospel passages follow the daily church readings for the season.
The scripture quotations are from the Revised Standard Version of the Bible, copyright 1973 by the Division of Christian Education, National Council of Churches.
www.rc.net /wcc/readings   (58 words)

  
 Gospel of Luke
Luke presents Jesus to the Gentiles as the savior of all mankind.
Luke was an educated physician, and an inspired historian.
Luke's careful narrative was written "in consecutive order" so that his reader would know the "exact truth" about the life and teachings of Jesus (Luke 1:1-4, Acts 1:1-2).
www.lifeofchrist.com /life/gospels/luke.asp   (344 words)

  
 The Gospel of Luke
Luke, the “beloved physician” mentioned in Paul’s letter to the Colossians has been the traditional author of this gospel.
Luke is one of what we call the “Synoptic Gospels,” which literally means “same eye” gospels.
Luke’s gospel begins with a genealogy like Matthew, but unlike Matthew, Luke draws his genealogy all the way back to Adam, the first human.
www.gettysburgsem.org /mhoffman/gospels04x/projects/price/MBPTheGospelofLuke.htm   (787 words)

  
 Luke the evangelist.
Luke is said in Colossians 4.14 to have been both a physician and an associate of the apostle Paul.
Luke, an Antiochene doctor, as his writings indicate, was not ignorant of the Greek speech.
Certain people suspect that, whenever Paul in his epistles says: According to my gospel, he means the volume of Luke, and that Luke was taught the gospel, not only by Paul, who had not been with the Lord in the flesh, but also by the other apostles.
www.textexcavation.com /luke.html   (564 words)

  
 Gospel According to Luke
Luke wrote for the "Hellenic world." This Gospel is indeed "rich and precious." "Out of a total of 1151 verses, Luke has 389 in common with Matthew and Mark, 176 in common with Matthew alone, 41 in common with Mark alone, leaving 544 peculiar to himself.
Luke's version of the commission to the disciples is new, in that "repentance and remission of sins" were to "be preached in His Name among all nations, beginning at Jerusalem" (v.
The Gospel was written, as is gathered from the prologue (i, 1-4), for the purpose of giving Theophilus (and others like him) increased confidence in the unshakable firmness of the Christian truths in which he had been instructed, or "catechized"--the latter word being used, according to Harnack, in its technical sense.
mb-soft.com /believe/txs/luke.htm   (10830 words)

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