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Topic: Gothic language


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  Gothic alphabet
Gothic was originally written with a Runic alphabet about which little is known.
The Gothic alphabet was invented around middle the 4th century AD by Bishop Wulfila (311-383 AD), the religious leader of the Visigoths, to provide his people with a written language and a means of reading his translation of the Bible.
Gothic, an extinct East Germanic language which was spoken in parts of the Crimea up until the 17th century.
omniglot.com /writing/gothic.htm   (199 words)

  
  Kids.Net.Au - Encyclopedia > Gothic language
It appears that the Gothic Bible was used by the Visigoths in Spain until circa 700 AD, and perhaps for a time in Italy, the Balkans and what is now the Ukraine.
The Gothic alphabet was probably created by bishop Ulfilas who also translated the Bible into the "razda" (language).
There are very few references to the Gothic language in secondary sources after about 800 AD, so perhaps it was rarely used by that date.
www.kids.net.au /encyclopedia-wiki/go/Gothic_language   (357 words)

  
  Gothic language - Article from FactBug.org - the fast Wikipedia mirror site   (Site not responding. Last check: )
The language was in decline by the mid-6th century, due in part to the military defeat of the Goths at the hands of the Franks, the elimination of the Goths in Italy, massive conversion to primarily Latin-speaking Roman Catholicism, and geographic isolation.
The language survived in Spain as late as the 8th century, and Frankish author Walafrid Strabo wrote that it was still spoken in the lower Danube area and in isolated mountain regions in Crimea in the early 9th century (see Crimean Gothic).
Gothic had nominative, accusative, genitive and dative cases, as well as vestiges of a vocative case that was sometimes identical to the nominative and sometimes to the accusative.
www.factbug.org /cgi-bin/a.cgi?a=11885   (4689 words)

  
 AllRefer.com - Gothic language (Language And Linguistics) - Encyclopedia
Gothic language, dead language belonging to the now extinct East Germanic group of the Germanic subfamily of the Indo-European family of languages (see Germanic languages).
Gothic has special value for the linguist because it was recorded several hundred years before the oldest surviving texts of all the other Germanic languages (except for a handful of earlier runic inscriptions in Old Norse).
The earliest extant document in Gothic preserves part of a translation of the Bible made in the 4th cent.
reference.allrefer.com /encyclopedia/G/Gothicla.html   (261 words)

  
 Gothic Alphabet
It is traditionally believed that the Gothic alphabet's 27 letters, consisting of 25 modified Greek symbols and 2 runes, were invented by bishop Wulfila, also known as Ulfilas (311-383), a Greek missionary responsible for the conversion of the Goths to Christianity.
The Goths spoke a Germanic language, unique not only in that it is the earliest documented Germanic language, but also in that it is the only language in a completely separate branch of the Germanic family unrelated to any other surviving Germanic languages.
The Gothic alphabet continued this tradition, and so in the case of Gothic, the first row of letters have numeric values of 1 to 9, the second row from 10 to 90, and the third row from 100 to 900.
www.spelwerx.com /gothic.html   (509 words)

  
 Gothic language   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Dead language belonging to the now extinct East Germanic group of the Germanic subfamily of the Indo-European family of languages (see Germanic languages).
Gothic has special value for the linguist because it was recorded several hundred years before the oldest surviving texts of all the other Germanic languages (except for a handful of earlier runic inscriptions in Old Norse).
The earliest extant document in Gothic preserves part of a translation of the Bible made in the 4th cent.
www.orbilat.com /Encyclopaedia/G/Gothic_Language.html   (120 words)

  
 Gothic Language - Search Results - MSN Encarta
Gothic Language, dead language, the only well-documented member of the extinct eastern branch of the Germanic languages.
The earliest printed writings in Latvian are written in Gothic script, a form of writing once used in Germany, and are religious in nature.
Indo-European Languages : extinct and archaic languages: Gothic language
encarta.msn.com /Gothic_Language.html   (147 words)

  
 Gothic - Language Directory
The Gothic language (gutiska razda) is an extinct Germanic language that was spoken by the Goths and specifically by the Visigoths.
The language survived in the Iberian peninsula (modern Spain and Portugal) as late as the 8th century, and Frankish author Walafrid Strabo wrote that it was still spoken in the lower Danube area and in isolated mountain regions in Crimea in the early 9th century (see Crimean Gothic).
The few fragments of their language from the 16th century show significant differences from the language of the Gothic Bible, although some of the glosses, such as ada for "egg", imply a common heritage.
language-directory.50webs.com /languages/gothic.htm   (612 words)

  
 Verbix -- Germanic. Conjugate verbs in 50+ languages
The earliest extensive Germanic text is the (incomplete) Gothic Bible, translated about AD 350 by the Visigothic bishop Ulfilas (Wulfila) and written in a 27-letter alphabet of the translator's own design.
The Germanic languages are related in the sense that they can be shown to be different historical developments of a single earlier parent language.
Although for some language families there are written records of the parent language (e.g., for the Romance languages, which are variant developments of Latin), in the case of Germanic no written records of the parent language exist.
www.verbix.com /languages/germanic.asp   (837 words)

  
 About the Gothic language
Gothic is the earliest extensively recorded Germanic language that has come down to us.
Knowledge of it is derived primarily from the remains of a Bible translation made in the 4th century by the Visigothic bishop Wulfila or Ulfilas, although the surviving manuscripts are not originals but later copies thought to have been written in northern Italy during the period of Ostrogothic rule (first half of the 6th century).
Anyone who is seriously interested in the history of Germanic languages should have at least some knowledge of Gothic: the language sheds light on the transition from Indo-European to the various Germanic languages and gives clear understanding of their structure in general.
www.wulfila.be /gothic/gotica   (629 words)

  
 Gothic Online: Selected Annotated Bibliography
There are few available editions of the Gothic corpus as a whole, the most accessible sources being the reading excerpts contained in the grammars listed in the next section.
The second volume is a complete dictionary of the Gothic language, particularly interesting for its labelling of verbs as perfective or imperfective as per Streitberg's description of such terms in his
Each of the major archaic Germanic languages is treated in a separate chapter, highlighting the way in which each differs from basic common Germanic characteristics as outlined in an early chapter.
www.utexas.edu /cola/centers/lrc/eieol/gotol-E.html   (1208 words)

  
 The Gothic Novel
Critics of the genre have engaged in analysis of the various elements of the Gothic novel and tie those elements with the repressed feelings of individuals and, in a twentieth century perspective, the unconscious of the human psyche.
Eve Kosofsky Sedgwick writes about the same idea in her essay, "The Structure of the Gothic Convention," and she adds that the idea of a protagonist having a struggle with a terrible, surreal person or force is a metaphor for an individual's struggle with repressed emotions or thoughts (Sedgwick 1).
Even though she parodies and mocks the Gothic novel, she still retains part of the genre's overarching themes: "the individual is something so precious that society must never be allowed to violate it" (Morse 29).
cai.ucdavis.edu /waters-sites/gothicnovel/155breport.html   (1621 words)

  
 Germanic Languages
Gothic was the East Germanic language of the Germanic speaking people who migrated from southern Scania (southern Sweden) to the Ukraine.
It is the official language of Sweden and is one of the official languages of Finland.
West Norse is the western branch of the North Germanic languages used in Iceland, Ireland, Norway, the Hebrides, Orkney, Shetland, and the Faroe Islands.
softrat.home.mindspring.com /germanic.html   (3010 words)

  
 Gothic alphabet
Gothic was originally written with a Runic alphabet about which little is known.
The Gothic alphabet was invented around middle the 4th century AD by Bishop Wulfila (311-383 AD), the religious leader of the Visigoths, to provide his people with a written language and a means of reading his translation of the Bible.
Gothic, an extinct East Germanic language which was spoken in parts of the Crimea up until the 17th century.
www.omniglot.com /writing/gothic.htm   (199 words)

  
 Glossary of Literary Gothic Terms
One of the earliest forms of Gothic literature, the Female Gothic often aims to socialize and educate its female readers and is usually morally conservative.
The presence of the Inquisition in Gothic literature functions as a synechdoche of its anti-Catholicismand, with its sense of relentless persecution, figures frequently in depictions of the pursued protagonist.
This convention in Gothic Literature is often used to obscure objects (see Burke's notion of the sublime) by reducing visibility or to prelude the insertion of a terrifying person or thing.
www.georgiasouthern.edu /~dougt/goth.html   (10015 words)

  
 Ancient Scripts: Gothic
At this time, the Goths wrote their language using their version of the Futhark alphabet, but it was deemed to be a pagan invention.
The Gothic alphabet continued this tradition, and so in the case of Gothic, the first row of letters have numeric values of 1 to 9, the second row from 10 to 90, and the third row from 100 to 900.
The Goths spoke a Germanic language, and it is unique not only in that it is the earliest documented Germanic language, but also in that it is the only language in a completely separate branch of the Germanic family unrelated to any other surviving Germanic languages.
www.ancientscripts.com /gothic.html   (280 words)

  
 Principal features of Gothic
Some letters are pronounced differently in Gothic from their pronunciation in Dutch, for example the is pronounced like the Dutch in "boek" (like English "soon"), but it can be either short or long.
Gothic uses the 1st, 2nd and 3rd person and a three-fold number division.
Weak verbs are an innovation of the Germanic languages.
www.ned.univie.ac.at /Publicaties/taalgeschiedenis/en/gotmerkmale.htm   (547 words)

  
 Gothic Unicode Fonts
(Gothic is the oldest known Germanic language.) The alphabet is mostly derived from Greek letters.
The Gothic language was previously written using 'pagan' runic letters.
The Unicode implementation of Gothic is described in chapter 13 (Archaic Scripts) of The Unicode Standard, Version 4.0.
www.wazu.jp /gallery/Fonts_Gothic.html   (351 words)

  
 [No title]   (Site not responding. Last check: )
In addition specimens of the language are preserved in the five Codices Ambrosiani and the Codex Carolinus (all of which are codices rescripti, and fragmentary), and the fragmentary Codex Turiensis.
The language of the Codex Argenteus and virtually all of the other Gothic fragments may be regarded as an ideolect used by Wulfila for his translation, and which may or may not represent Gothic as it was spoken by any of the Gothic peoples.
The Gothic homeland and migrations are the subject of controversy; what is not in doubt is that there were very substantial movements of people over a large geographical area.
www.shakespeare.uk.net /journal/1_3/DAVIS.DOC   (1903 words)

  
 Gothic language - Encyclopedia.com
Gothic language dead language belonging to the now extinct East Germanic group of the Germanic subfamily of the Indo-European family of languages (see Germanic languages).
Bibliography: See J. Wright, Grammar of the Gothic Language and the Gospel of St. Mark (2d ed.
The Nordic languages; an international handbook of the history of the North Germanic languages; v.2.(Brief Article)(Book Review)
www.encyclopedia.com /doc/1E1-Gothicla.html   (396 words)

  
 Teach Yourself Gothic
Since Gothic is the oldest Germanic language we have, it gives us a valuable philological insight into the earliest forms of the ancient Germanic language family.
Amongst the most useful Gothic site is David Salo's An Introduction to Gothic, which leads a beginner through the basics of the language with some simple lessons and exercises.
For some people to talk to in Gothic there's the Gutiska mailing list, which is pretty low traffic, or the Gothic-L list which has more volume but is dominated by historical discussion of the Goths these days.
www.ancientworlds.net /179352   (453 words)

  
 Language Log: This is not Middle Earth
Tolkien was a philologist specializing in the history of the English language, and Professor of Anglo-Saxon at Oxford University.
All of these were inspired by his study of real-world languages, histories and literatures, where he had the credentials of a serious scholar.
Thus Tolkien's races are radically different from one another in biology, language and culture; and across these races, biology, language and culture are well correlated.
itre.cis.upenn.edu /~myl/languagelog/archives/000214.html   (751 words)

  
 Gothic language
Soon afterwards, Gothic was assimilated by Romance dialects in Italy, Spain and France.
Gothic is the only Germanic language which preserved reduplication in the 7th class of strong verbs (haitan - haihait 'to call - called').
Though the sources of the Gothic language are rather scarce, there are a great lot of archaic terms which make the language most useful for comparative studies.
indoeuro.bizland.com /tree/germ/gothic.html   (359 words)

  
 Amazon.com: An Introduction to the Gothic Language (Introductions to Older Languages, 2): Books: William Holmes Bennett   (Site not responding. Last check: )
An Introduction to the Gothic Language (Introductions to Older Languages, 2) by William Holmes Bennett
The various languages used in the text are clearly transliterated, and the type and layout is clutter-free.
These last sections range from an easy-to-read discussion about Indo-European to the place of Gothic within the Germanic language family, to a brief history of the Gothic tribes, to (later) discussions about phonetics and morphology that are more technical, not b/c of their writing style but simply b/c they're packed with information.
www.amazon.com /Introduction-Gothic-Language-Introductions-Languages/dp/0873522958   (1846 words)

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