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Topic: Gothic novel


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In the News (Mon 10 Dec 18)

  
  Gothic Novel - MSN Encarta
Gothic Novel, type of romantic fiction that predominated in English literature in the last third of the 18th century and the first two decades of the 19th century, the setting for which was usually a ruined Gothic castle or abbey (see Gothic Art and Architecture).
The Gothic novel, or Gothic romance, emphasized mystery and horror and was filled with ghost-haunted rooms, underground passages, and secret stairways.
The term Gothic is also used to designate narrative prose or poetry of which the principal elements are violence, horror, and the supernatural.
encarta.msn.com /encnet/refpages/RefArticle.aspx?refid=761553321   (189 words)

  
  Gothic Readings by Rictor Norton   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Some Gothic plots are seen as narratives of emergent female sexuality, in terms of the heroine’s relation both with her mother and with the patriarchal villain.
These novels draw their potent imagery from the fall of the Bastille in 1789, but by the end of the last volume, after the wicked are punished and the just are married, the new social order that replaces feudal tyranny might best be termed upper-middle-class benevolence.
All romantic novels, Gothic or sentimental, toy with the subversive possiblity of inter-class love, but the heroines rarely marry into the class beneath them, a fate prevented by the discovery of a strawberry birthmark that proves that their peasant lover is, after all, of noble (or at least gentle) birth, the same as they.
www.infopt.demon.co.uk /gothintr.htm   (2350 words)

  
 Gothic
Gothic literature as a movement was a disappointment to the idealistic romantic poets for the sentimental character idealized by Ann Radcliffe could not transcend into reality.
Although the Gothic novel influenced many of the emerging genres, the outpouring of Gothic novels started to ease by 1815 and with the publication of Charles Maturin's Melmoth the Wanderer the genre began to fade.
The influence of the Gothic novel is felt today in the portrayal of the alluring antagonist, whose evil characteristics appeal to ones sense of awe, or the melodramatic aspects of romance, or more specifically in the Gothic motif of a persecuted maiden forced apart from a true love.
piazza.iae.nl /users/sceav/hgengels/gothic.htm   (473 words)

  
 Gothic novel - ArticleWorld   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Most of the first gothic novelists were fascinated by the medieval era and style and their novels found their most natural settings in the remote ruins of castles, mansions and monasteries.
Although not the first gothic novelist, it is Ann Radcliffe who is considered to be the pioneer of the gothic novel.
Gothic novels were also being published in France and Germany, with the ‘roman noir’ or fl novel in the former and the ‘Schauerroman’ or shudder novel in the latter.
www.articleworld.org /index.php/Gothic_novel   (390 words)

  
 Women and the Gothic
And within the world of the Gothic novel, women are subject to numerous assaults on their virtue and to the tyranny of fathers, would-be lovers, and husbands.
Reeve felt that the violence of Walpole's novel destroyed the effect it was meant to have by drawing too much attention to itself; Walpole declared her novel "insipid." The young hero, Edmund, braves many horrors to obtain his rightful place in the world.
Dacre was one of the Gothic's most flexible practioners, marrying her tales to epistolary formats, the novel of manners, and here, a domestic tale.
www.lib.virginia.edu /small/exhibits/gothic/women.html   (726 words)

  
 The Gothic Literature Page
Gothic literature as a movement was a disappointment to the idealistic romantic poets for the sentimental character idealized by Ann Radcliffe could not transcend into reality.
The influence of the Gothic novel is felt today in the portrayal of the alluring antagonist, whose evil characteristics appeal to ones sense of awe, or the melodramatic aspects of romance, or more specifically in the Gothic motif of a persecuted maiden forced apart from a true love.
The development of the Gothic Novel from the melancholy overtures of sentimental literature to the rise of the sublime in the graveyard poets had a profound impact on the budding Romantic movement from Wordsworth to Shelley.
members.aol.com /franzpoet/intro.html   (514 words)

  
 The Gothic Novel
The Gothic novel took shape mostly in England from 1790 to 1830 and falls within the category of Romantic literature.
Critics of the genre have engaged in analysis of the various elements of the Gothic novel and tie those elements with the repressed feelings of individuals and, in a twentieth century perspective, the unconscious of the human psyche.
Even though she parodies and mocks the Gothic novel, she still retains part of the genre's overarching themes: "the individual is something so precious that society must never be allowed to violate it" (Morse 29).
cai.ucdavis.edu /waters-sites/gothicnovel/155breport.html   (1621 words)

  
 The Gothic novel
The rise of fantastic fiction in France parallels the rise of the gothic novel in England.
The Gothic novel is a literary genre, which can be said to have been born with The Castle of Otranto (1764) by Horace Walpole.
The gothic novel, of the early nineteenth century, was responsible above all else for the term gothic being associated with a mood of horror, darkness and the supernatural.
www.jahsonic.com /GothicNovel.html   (1470 words)

  
 Supernatural, Spiritual and Spectral Gothicism .... by Alicia Mistry
Nevertheless, the Gothic genre became an effective literary device for the novels of Charlotte and Emily, thrusting the Gothic novel and all of its attributes into the mainstream of British prose writers and their works.
The Gothic, sinister tone that the writers adopt is bad enough for the Brontë's protagonists, but the really horrifying occurrences have prosaic explanations (malicious aunts, abusive husbands) and are perpetrated by their relatives and alleged friends.
Gothic novels of the time depicted the revival of interest in the supernatural, the abnormal and ultimately the horrible.
www.boloji.com /literature/00117.htm   (2684 words)

  
 Gothic novel info   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Gothic Novel, type of romantic fiction that predominated in English literature in the last third of the 18th century and the first two decades of the 19th, the setting for which was usually a ruined Gothic castle or abbey.
The Gothic novel, or romance, emphasized mystery and horror and was filled with ghost-haunted rooms, underground passages, and secret stairways.
The term Gothic is used to designate narrative prose or poetry of which the principal elements are violence, horror, and the supernatural.
www.dorraine.supanet.com /gothic.htm   (132 words)

  
 In what way is frankenstein a gothic novel
Gothic novels originated from gothic architecture, this medieval type of architecture was pointed arches, cathedrals, ruins and ancient statues, therefore these novels where very often set in a gloomy castle replete with dungeons, subterranean passages and sliding panels.
Gothic novels were written mainly to evoke terror in their readers; they also served to show the dark side of human nature.
This sentence also hints at what is to happen to Elizabeth as later on in the novel she is killed by the monster on there wedding night and in the sentence Mary Shelly has used the alliteration of "folds of the funnel" to emphasise the death element.
www.gothiccenter.com /Gothic_paragraph.htm   (1753 words)

  
 Novel, Romance, and Gothic: Brief Definitions
Authors of such novels set their stories in the medieval period, often in a gloomy castle replete with dungeons, subterranean passages, and sliding panels, and made plentiful use of ghosts, mysterious disappearances, and other sensational and supernatural occurrences; their principal aim was to evoke chilling terror by exploiting mystery, cruelty, and a variety of horrors.
The term "gothic" has also been extended to denote a type of fiction which lacks the medieval setting but develops a brooding atmosphere of gloom or terror, represents events which are uncanny, or macabre, or melodramatically violent, and often deals with aberrant psychological states.
The live burial that is a favorite conventual punishment in Gothic novels derives much of its horror not from the buried person's loss of outside activities (that would be the horror or dead burial), but from the continuation of a parallel activity that is suddenly redundant.
www.wsu.edu /~campbelld/amlit/novel.htm   (1644 words)

  
 I
As a result, that which the middle-class, the social group characters of gothic fiction often represent, loathed and feared was ironically part of their identity; however, this anomaly in fiction took the form of the seemingly unreal—the alien, the ghost, Frankenstein’s monster, Dracula, etc.—which allowed characters to confront yet remain removed from their psychological fears.
The doppelganger in gothic fiction and film refers to the second self or mirror image of the character who disregards societal limitations and is free to act on his own free will—often, as in the case of Dr.
Gothic fiction often shows it readers, however, that the female “other” is actually a part of the male psyche through the male’s unconscious memory that he has been inside and outside his mother whom he now fears and desires.
www.westga.edu /~scarter/Elements_of_Gothic_Literature.htm   (1002 words)

  
 gothic novel
The late 20th century has seen a huge revival in interest in the genre, particularly in film, and the novels of the US writer Stephen King are carefully crafted examples.
Wilkie Collins employed gothic conventions in his mystery novel The Woman in White (1860) and Arthur Conan Doyle did likewise with his detective fiction in The Hound of the Baskervilles (1902).
Jane Austen satirized the gothic novel in Northanger Abbey (1818).
www.tiscali.co.uk /reference/encyclopaedia/hutchinson/m0004010.html   (426 words)

  
 A Brief Historical Overview
Their different approaches to the novel of terror, as it was called in the eighteenth century, have given been called by some critics terror Gothic, represented by Radcliffe, and horror Gothic, represented by Lewis.
These novels follow a pattern: an innocent, inexperienced, young heroine suspects her superior suitor or husband, who is usually older, often wealthy, and worldly-wise of a crime; she may have to compete with an older woman for his affections, a competition she of course wins.
What these novels do for the women who devour them is to reassure them of the primacy and the power of heterosexual romance and love and to allay their doubts about what it takes to be a desirable, beloved woman.
academic.brooklyn.cuny.edu /english/melani/gothic/history.html   (1430 words)

  
 Northanger Canon
The novel was published 1 year after Austen's death, and this edition includes an apologetic foreword in which the publisher explains that the book may seem out-of-date as fashions in literature have changed.
In the novel, the orphaned Emily St. Aubert is carried off by her aunt's villainous husband Montoni to a remote castle in the Apennines, where her life, honor, and fortune are threated and she is surrounded by apparently supernatural terrors.
Of course, her trials are those of the traditional Gothic heroine, and it is through foiling numerous assaults on her virtue that she discovers her true noble birth.
www.lib.virginia.edu /small/exhibits/gothic/north.html   (821 words)

  
 The Punk-Gothic Vision: From Blade Runner to Batman and Robin
The symbol of this unity was the Gothic cathedral.
Gothic works and their disturbing ambivalence can thus be seen as effects of fear and anxiety, as attempts to account for or deal with the uncertainty of these shifts.
Gothic and punk imagery were most popularly combined, then, in the cult classic Rocky Horror Picture Show which I do not call Punk-Gothic because of its camp which does not allow the film to make anything other than a playful statement.
campus.kcu.edu /faculty/cstarr/Film/gothic.htm   (3963 words)

  
 Gothic fiction - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The opprobrious term "gothick" was embraced by the 18th century proponents of the gothic revival, a forerunner of the Romantic genres.
Gothic revival architecture, which became popular in the nineteenth century, was a reaction to the classical architecture that was a hallmark of the Age of Reason.
Mary Shelley's novel, though clearly influenced by the gothic tradition, is often considered the first science fiction novel, despite the omission in the novel of any scientific explanation of the monster's animation and the focus instead on the moral issues and consequences of such a creation.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Gothic_novel   (2915 words)

  
 GOTHIC STUDIES   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Accounts for the phenomenal growth of Gothic studies over the last five decades (1950-1999) by noting that the Gothic "is a major and by now a long lasting force in the production of Western culture" and a major symbolic conveyer of cultural and religious anxiety.
Notes that the front itself is often perceived in Gothic terms as a "landscape of death" replete with subterranean horrors and the sense of being permanently entrapped within a horrid and inescapable labyrinth.
Scrutinizes the critical reputation of Lewis's Gothic drama and claims that it was the anticipation of horrid and sensational spectacle (such as the appearance of the Bleeding Nun) rather than spectacle itself that guaranteed the popularity and success of the play with audiences in 1797.
thesicklytaper.net /GOTHIC_STUDIES.htm   (5109 words)

  
 Realms of Horror
In literature the term "Gothic" refers to the principal elements of horror and the supernatural found in the Victorian gothic revival period novels.
His 1765 novel The Castle of Otranto is said to have influenced many of the early writers of the genre.
Today the Horror genre is as popular as ever, Anne Rice dominates gothic literature with her vampire novels and Stephen King holds the rank of Master of General Horror Fiction.
www.geocities.com /realmsofwisdom/Horror/Horror.html   (452 words)

  
 gothic - Definitions from Dictionary.com
The word Gothic, first recorded in 1611 in a reference to the language of the Goths, was extended in sense in several ways, meaning "Germanic," "medieval, not classical," "barbarous," and also an architectural style that was not Greek or Roman.
Horace Walpole applied the word Gothic to his novel The Castle of Otranto, a Gothic Story (1765) in the sense "medieval, not classical." From this novel filled with scenes of terror and gloom in a medieval setting descended a literary genre still popular today; from its subtitle descended the name for it.
Gothic was used by scholars to mean "Germanic, Teutonic" (1647), hence its evolution as a term for the art style that emerged in northern Europe in the Middle Ages, and the early 19c.
dictionary.reference.com /browse/gothic   (965 words)

  
 [No title]
The gothic novel is a literary genre, which began in Britain with The Castle of Otranto (1764) by Horace Walpole.
The mood and themes of the gothic novel held a particular fascination for the Victorians, with their morbid obsession with mourning rituals, Mementos, and mortality in general, which led to them becoming a widespread literary influence.
Rankin thought he was writing a Gothic novel, something in the tradition of Stevenson’s Jekyll And Hyde, but when Knots And Crosses was published in 1987 it was reviewed as a crime book and sold in the crime section of stores.
www.lycos.com /info/gothic-novel.html   (459 words)

  
 Gothic Literature: An Overview | Introduction: Gothic Literature
The Gothic worlds depicted fears about what might happen, what could go wrong, and what could be lost by continuing along the path of political, social, and theological change, as well as reflecting the desire to return to the time of fantasy and belief in supernatural intervention that characterized the Middle Ages.
In Gothic narratives writers were able to both express the anxiety generated by this upheaval and, as Burke suggested, increase society's appreciation and desire for change and progress.
Radcliffe's 1794 novel, The Mysteries of Udolpho is regarded by many as the quintessential example of eighteenth-century fiction at its finest, and it is for this work that she is best known.
www.enotes.com /gothic-literature/gothic-literature-an-overview   (773 words)

  
 Interrogate why you believe Mary Shelley's Frankenstein is a classic gothic novel. -- Essay at LiteratureClassics.com
The novel is sometimes set in places of gloom and horror: the lab and the island in the Orkney’s.
Gothicism is shown in the seemingly supernatural creation (for the time) of the Creature and the dream of Victor’s about Elizabeth after he brought the Creature into being.
Shelley not only creates a story that conforms to the elements of a Gothic novel, but she combines these elements in such a way to produce the standard by which all other Gothic novels are measured.
www.literatureclassics.com /essays/805   (1447 words)

  
 Sentimental novel - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The sentimental novel or the novel of sensibility is an 18th century literary genre which celebrates the emotional and intellectual concepts of sentiment, sentimentalism, and sensibility.
Sentimental novels are related to the domestic fiction of the early eighteenth century.
Jane Austen wrote a Gothic novel parody titled Northanger Abbey (1803), reflecting the death of the Gothic novel.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Sentimental_novel   (628 words)

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