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Topic: Great Awakening


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In the News (Sat 20 Apr 19)

  
  Great Awakening - MSN Encarta
The Great Awakenings refer to several periods of dramatic religious revival in Anglo-American religious history, generally recognized as beginning in the 1730s.
The First Great Awakening (often referred by historians as the Great Awakening) is the name sometimes given to a period of heightened religious activity, primarily in Great...
The Great Awakening was thus a significant intercolonial movement, which contributed to a sense of American nationality before the American Revolution.
encarta.msn.com /encyclopedia_761555596/Great_Awakening.html   (468 words)

  
 The Great Awakening
The period of the Great Awakening was characterized by extravagant worship and fervor praise.
One great consequence of the Great Awakening was the division that was
The Great awakening of the 1940s was introduced by revivals of the1730s and continued to be saluted by other similar revivals (sermons of hellfire and brimstone) that compelled men and women to change their wicked lifestyles and ways so they could avoid the wrath of God on Judgement Day that was soon to come.
louisville.edu /~mrbach01/601.htm   (7580 words)

  
  Great Awakening - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Some scholars accept a Fourth Great Awakening which occurred during the 1960s to the 1970s, corresponding to a rise in the charismatic/Pentecostal movement in the United States.
Examples of such precursors to a Great Awakening are the Spiritualism movement, which preceded the Third Great Awakening, and the Beatnik movement, which preceded the Fourth.
Although the Great Awakenings influence and are influenced by religious thought from throughout the world, the cycle of Great Awakenings appear to be unique to the United States.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Great_Awakening   (773 words)

  
 Great Awakening – FREE Great Awakening Information | Encyclopedia.com: Facts, Pictures, Information!
Great Awakening series of religious revivals that swept over the American colonies about the middle of the 18th cent.
The revival reached the South with the preaching (1748-59) of Samuel Davies among the Presbyterians of Virginia, with the great success of the Baptists in North Carolina in the 1760s, and with the rapid spread of Methodism shortly before the American Revolution.
The Great Awakening also resulted in an outburst of missionary activity among Native Americans by such men as David Brainerd, Eleazar Wheelock, and Samuel Kirkland ; in the first movement of importance against slavery; and in various other humanitarian undertakings.
www.encyclopedia.com /doc/1E1-GreatAwa.html   (1367 words)

  
 Second Great Awakening - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The Second Great Awakening was the second great religious revival in United States history and consisted of several kinds of activity, distinguished by locale and expression of religious commitment.
The great revival quickly spread throughout Kentucky, Tennessee and southern Ohio, with the Methodists and the Baptists its prime beneficiaries.
The numerical strength of the Baptists and Methodists rose relative to that of the denominations dominant in the colonial period—the Anglicans, Presbyterians, Congregationalists, and Quakers.
www.wikipedia.org /wiki/Second_Great_Awakening   (762 words)

  
 First Great Awakening - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: )
The First Great Awakening was a religious movement among American colonial Protestants in the 1730s and 1740s.
The Great Awakening was perhaps the first truly "American" event, and as such represented at least a small step towards the unification of the colonies.
The Great Awakening may also be interpreted as the last major expression of the religious ideals on which the New England colonies were founded.
www.sevenhills.us /project/wikipedia/index.php/First_Great_Awakening   (458 words)

  
 "The Great Awakening and its effect on....."
The Great Awakening was a religious movement during the 1730's and 1740's in which itinerant ministers presented powerful messages of salvation and which provided early Americans with a greater sense of nationality.
The Great Awakening made clear "the interests of The New Englander in fundamental law, his belief that any violation of it by those in authority was tyranny and that revolt against such tyranny was legal and not only legal but a religious duty.
In the southern colonies, the Great Awakening was again an unwelcome challenge to the established and privileged position of the upper class.
www.longmeadow.org /hist_soc/awakening.htm   (1940 words)

  
 Great awakenings - Theopedia
The Great Awakening was perhaps the first truly "American" event, and as such represented at least a small step towards the unification of the colonies.
The Great Awakening may also be interpreted as the last major expression of the religious ideals on which the New England colonies were founded.
The Third Great Awakening spawned the Niagara Bible Conference, the rise of U.S. Fundamentalism, and the independent Bible institute and Bible college movement, all generally in reaction to liberalism in the mainline denominations.
www.theopedia.com /Great_awakenings   (1274 words)

  
 First Great Awakening - Conservapedia
Among the most notable clergy who fueled the awakening was Theodore Frelinguysen who led a revival in the 1720s among members of the Dutch Reformed Church in New Jersey.
The Great Awakenings effect on early American settles was largely significant, directly effecting two thirds of the population.
The clergymen of the Great Awakening valued education, and during this period the University of Pennsylvania (1740), Princeton (1746), Brown (1764), Rutgers (1766), and Dartmouth (1770) were founded, all with identifiable connection to the movement.
www.conservapedia.com /Great_Awakening   (683 words)

  
 Great Awakening   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Great Awakenings are commonly said to be periods of religious revival in U.S. religious history.
A Great Awakening happens when social change renders traditional religion (or the thesis in Hegel's terminology) no longer able to answer the questions posed by modern life.
For example, the abolition movement, part of the wider Second Great Awakening, eventually contributed to the American Civil War.
mywiseowl.com /articles/Great_Awakening   (567 words)

  
 The Society of Colonial Wars in the State of Connecticut - 1740's Jonathan Edwards and the Great Awakening
The Great Awakening (Second Turning, 1727-1746) began as a spiritual revival in the Connecticut Valley and reached an hysterical peak in the northern colonies (in 1741) with the preachings of George Whitefield and the tracts of Jonathan Edwards.
The Great Awakening of 1735-1745 was a reaction to a decline in piety and a laxity of morals within the Congregational Churches of New England.
The Great Awakening of 1735, though all-encompassing and dramatic, was one in a number of recorded revivals throughout church history.
www.colonialwarsct.org /1740_s.htm   (6439 words)

  
 The Great Awakening
The Great Awakening was an outpouring of religious enthusiasm that occurred in the American colonies in the mid-18th century.
In New England, the Awakening was fired by the sermons of Jonathan Edwards, a minister in Northampton, Massachusetts.
The Great Awakening led to efforts to convert Native American communities and also the establishment of new institutions of higher learning (Brown, Dartmouth, Princeton and Rutgers).
www.u-s-history.com /pages/h620.html   (399 words)

  
 EDSITEment - Lesson Plan
Known as the First Great Awakening, the movements were characterized by emotional religious conversions from a state of sin to a "new birth" and by dramatic and powerful preaching, sometimes outdoors, by itinerant preachers in front of crowds of thousands.
Preachers of the Awakening also taught that the essence of religious experience was a "new birth" inspired by the preaching of the Word of God—that is, a personal spiritual conversion in which the individual rejected his or her sinful past and was "born again" into a life devoted to Christianity.
The First Great Awakening might also be seen as a Christian appropriation of certain aspects of the Enlightenment, such as emphasis on the individual, reliance on experience instead of authority, and mistrust of tradition.
edsitement.neh.gov /view_lesson_plan.asp?id=698   (2742 words)

  
 Rise of Evangelicalism
Hatch's revisionary look at the Second Great Awakening as a fundamentally centrifugal event has provided the field of American religious history with a useful lens through which to view the period, but he gives short shrift to the ways in which the Awakening entailed myriad forms of centripetal cohesion on the local level.
He highlighted the unifying nature of Awakening at the expense of an analysis of regional variation, and left open the question as to how the actual words or messages of itinerant preachers and the psychological advantages of evangelical Protestantism were instrumental in winning over so many converts.
The Awakening, however, was not a uniform phenomenon; the theological and social changes it effected took place at different times, and with varying intensity, in different areas of the nation.
xroads.virginia.edu /~MA95/finseth/evangel.html   (2145 words)

  
 501117: An Appraisal of the Great Awakening
The Great Awakening was the first serious attempt to bring religion to the masses in the American Colonies.
The great revival in the middle colonies was quite influential in the rise of many educational institutions.
The Great Awakening was conducted chiefly by men of education, "and it has left its decided record and invaluable monuments in the way of institutions of learning and religious literature." We have shown above how the College of New Jersey and the Theological Seminary at Princeton grew out of Tennent's Log College at Neshaming.
www.stanford.edu /group/King/publications/papers/vol1/501117-An_Appraisal_of_the_Great_Awakening.htm   (5977 words)

  
 Awakening News >>> Great Seal Exposed
There is much symbolism on the Great Seal and dollar bill, which have their Masonic and Satanic roots.
Their silly little statements that the Great Seal is not Masonic leads to much questioning over whether Freemasonry is in fact a Christian religion, so therefore they have obviously made out that Masons are playing for the wrong team.
We also see many pyramids- one the Great Seal and there is a pyramid etched out in the streets of Washington DC too.
www.geocities.com /theawakeningnews/Religion-Great_Seal_Dollar_Bill.html   (1860 words)

  
 The Great Awakening
Many who looked on themselves as in a Christless condition, seemed to be awakened by it, with fear that God was about to withdraw from the land, and that we should be given up to heterodoxy and corrupt principles; and that then their opportunity for obtaining salvation would be past.
Presently upon this, a great and earnest concern about the great things of religion and the eternal world, became universal in all parts of the town, and among persons of all degrees, and all ages.
But a great Part of those that have been remarkably wrought upon, are such as before had very little if any Thing of the Form and Appearance of Religion: and among these the divine Sovereignty has been very illustriously display’d.
www.assumption.edu /users/mcclymer/His130/P-H/greatawakening/default.html   (5504 words)

  
 Basic Concepts of the First Great Awakening
The Great Awakening was a spiritual renewal that swept the American Colonies, particularly New England, during the first half of the 18th Century.
The Awakening's biggest significance was the way it prepared America for its War of Independence.
Through the Awakening, the Colonists realized that religious power resided in their own hands, rather than in the hands of the Church of England, or any other religious authority.
www.great-awakening.com /concepts.htm   (435 words)

  
 The Great Awakening
Although the name is slightly misleading--the Great Awakening was not one continuous revival, rather it was several revivals in a variety of locations--it says a great deal about the state of religion in the colonies.
This led the established clergy to attack Whitefield and the unchecked enthusiasm of the revivals in general, and the Great Awakening in particular.
In the South, the Great Awakening was more of a frontier phenomenon than was the case in the Middle Colonies or New England.
www.wfu.edu /~matthetl/perspectives/four.html   (2708 words)

  
 A Faithful Narrative of the Surprising Work of God   (Site not responding. Last check: )
These awakenings when they have first seized on persons, have had two effects; one was, that they have brought them immediately to quit their sinful practices; and the looser sort have been brought to forsake and dread their former vices and extravagances.
As to those in whom awakenings seem to have a saving issue, commonly the first thing that appears after their legal troubles, is a conviction of the justice of God in their condemnation, appearing in a sense of their own exceeding sinfulness, and the vileness of all their performances.
She was first awakened in the winter season, on Monday, by something she heard her brother say of the necessity of being in good earnest in seeking regenerating grace, together with the news of the conversion of the young woman before mentioned, whose conversion so generally affected most of the young people here.
www.jonathanedwards.com /text/Narrative.htm   (18906 words)

  
 Jonathan Edwards: On the Great Awakening
An account of the second wave of the Great Awakening in Northampton, Massachusetts, is given in the following letter of December 12, 1743, addressed by Jonathan Edwards to the Reverend Thomas Prince in Boston.
The former great outpouring of the spirit was remarkable for influences upon the minds of children, beyond all that had ever been before; but this far exceeded that.
Though, on the other hand, there is a great number whose temper and conversation as such as justly confirms the charity of others toward them; and not a few in whose disposition and walk there are amiable appearances of eminent grace.
www.nhinet.org /ccs/docs/awaken.htm   (2220 words)

  
 From Revolution to Reconstruction: Outlines: American History (1994): Chapter Four: The Second Great Awakening (13/13)
This second great religious revival in American history consisted of several kinds of activity, distinguished by locale and expression of religious commitment.
In contrast to the Great Awakening of the 1730s, the revivals in the East were notable for the absence of hysteria and open emotion.
In the Appalachian region, the revival took on characteristics similar to the Great Awakening of the previous century.
odur.let.rug.nl /~usa/H/1994/ch4_p13.htm   (746 words)

  
 Great Awakening. The Columbia Encyclopedia, Sixth Edition. 2001-07
Other preachers followed, and with the tour (1739–41) of the famous Methodist preacher George Whitefield, the isolated currents of revivalism united and flowed into all the colonies.
The revival reached the South with the preaching (1748–59) of Samuel Davies among the Presbyterians of Virginia, with the great success of the Baptists in North Carolina in the 1760s, and with the rapid spread of Methodism shortly before the American Revolution.
The Great Awakening also resulted in an outburst of missionary activity among Native Americans by such men as David Brainerd, Eleazar Wheelock, and Samuel Kirkland; in the first movement of importance against slavery; and in various other humanitarian undertakings.
www.bartleby.com /65/gr/GreatAwa.html   (513 words)

  
 THE GREAT AWAKENING
The awakening proved to be both unitive and divisive.
Theologically, the awakening led to an emphasis on the subjective.
The awakening led to an increased emphasis on piety and spirituality.
www.christianchronicler.com /history1/great_awakening.html   (1468 words)

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