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Topic: Great Jewish Revolt


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In the News (Wed 24 Apr 19)

  
  The Great Revolt
The Jews' Great Revolt against Rome in 66 C.E. led to one of the greatest catastrophes in Jewish life and, in retrospect, might well have been a terrible mistake.
In later generations, the rabbis hyperbolically declared that the revolt's failure, and the Temple's destruction, was due not to Roman military superiority but to causeless hatred (sinat khinam) among the Jews (Yoma 9b).
Indeed, the Great Revolt of 66-70, followed some sixty years later by the Bar Kokhba revolt, were the greatest calamities in Jewish history prior to the Holocaust.
www.jewishvirtuallibrary.org /jsource/Judaism/revolt.html   (1123 words)

  
  Great Uprising - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The Great Uprising, Great Revolt, or Great Arab Revolt was a violent rebellion by Arabs in the British Mandate of Palestine which lasted from 1936 to 1939.
The revolt was driven primarily by Arab hostility to Britain's tolerance of restricted Jewish immigration and land purchases which Arabs argued was leading them to becoming a minority in what they considered their territory and future nation-state.
The mainstream Jewish military organization, the Haganah (Hebrew for "defense"), actively supported British efforts to quell the largely peasant revolt insurgency, with the insurgent bands, at their peak during the summer and fall of 1938, reaching 10,000 Arab fighters.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Great_Uprising   (505 words)

  
 Great Jewish Revolt - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-16)
The Great Jewish Revolt (66–73 CE), sometimes called The first Jewish-Roman War, was the first of two major rebellions by the Jews of Judea against the Roman Empire (the second was Bar Kokhba's revolt in 132-135).
The defeat of the Jewish revolts against the Roman Empire notably contributed to the numbers and geography of the Jewish Diaspora, as many Jews were scattered after losing their state or were sold to slavery throughout the empire.
The revolt began in 66 in Caesarea, provoked by the desecration of local synagogue by the Hellenists, with which the Greek-speaking Roman garrison did not intrude.
www.peekskill.us /project/wikipedia/index.php/Great_Jewish_Revolt   (1056 words)

  
 Jewish - Encyclopedia.WorldSearch   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-16)
While Jewish communities throughout the Islamic world were often treated well by their Muslim rulers, depending on the regime in power, Jewish communities in Spain, North Africa, and the Middle East were at times subject to persecutions, expulsions, and forced conversion.
Since the Jewish Enlightenment (see haskalah) of the 1700s and the subsequent emancipation of the Jewish populations of Europe and America in the 1800s, Jews have increasingly participated in, and become part of, secular society.
The revolt was smashed by the Roman emperors Vespasian and Titus Flavius.
encyclopedia.worldsearch.com /jewish.htm   (4040 words)

  
 Josephus - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-16)
Josephus fought in the Great Jewish Revolt of 66-73 CE/AD, acting as a military leader in Galilee.
He makes references to the Sadducees, Jewish High Priests of the time, Pharisees and Essenes, the Herodian Temple, Quirinius’s census, and to such figures as Pontius Pilate, Herod the Great, Agrippa I and II, John the Baptist, James (the brother of Jesus) and a brief and highly disputed reference to Jesus himself.
His first work in Rome was account of the Great Jewish Revolt addressed to the Jewish community in Mesopotamia in the Aramaic language.
www.lighthousepoint.us /project/wikipedia/index.php/Josephus   (1037 words)

  
 First Jewish-Roman War - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The first Jewish-Roman War (66–73 CE), sometimes called the Great Jewish Revolt, was the first of three major rebellions by the Jews of Iudaea Province against the Roman Empire (the second was the Kitos War in 115-117, the third was Bar Kokhba's revolt in 132-135).
The revolt began in 66 in Caesarea, provoked by the desecration of a local synagogue by Hellenists; the Greek-speaking Roman garrison did not intercede.
In an act of defiance, the son of high priest Eliezar ben Hanania ceased prayers and sacrifices for the Roman Emperor at the Temple and subsequently led a successful attack on the Roman garrison stationed in Jerusalem.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Great_Jewish_Revolt   (1117 words)

  
 The Glossary of Terms and Names
Jewish books written in the Hellenistic-Roman period that came to be included in the Old Greek Jewish scriptures (and thus in the Eastern Christian biblical canon and in the Latin Vulgate Roman Catholic canon), but not in the Jewish or Protestant biblical canons.
Was prompted by the ban on practicing the Jewish religion and desecration of the Temple and lead by Matthatias of the priestly Hasmonean family and later by his five sons, the most prominent warrior of them Judah the Maccabee.
Jewish settlement in Jerusalem was resumed; later the Jewish community diminished under burden of new taxes and limitations.
mosaic.lk.net /glossary.html   (2063 words)

  
 Josephus
The historian known to posterity by the Latinized name Josephus was a member of Jerusalem's priestly aristocracy who, at age 30, was taken hostage in the great Jewish revolt against Rome [66-70 CE] and spent the rest of his life in Roman circles as a protégé of three emperors [Vespasian, Titus and Domitian].
His constant need to explain his role in the unsuccessful Jewish uprising that climaxed with the destruction of the Jerusalem temple led him to publish four works [in Greek] that are our prime source for information about events that shaped the history of Jews of the second temple period.
He was one of two sons of a Jewish priest who claimed descent from the Hasmonean family of priests who had won Jewish independence from the Greco-Syrian empire two centuries earlier.
virtualreligion.net /iho/josephus.html   (1022 words)

  
 CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: Flavius Josephus
He accompanied the emperor as far as Egypt, when the latter had handled over to his son the prosecution of the Jewish War, but then joined the retinue of Titus, and was an eyewitness of the destruction of the Holy City and her Temple.
In his life, as in his writings, he pursued a policy midway between Jewish and pagan culture, for which he was accused by his Jewish countrymen of being unprincipled and hypocritical.
In the middle of the nineteenth century the interest in the "Jewish Antiquities" was revived by a translation which the Society of St. Charles Borromeo induced Professor Konrad Martin, afterwards Bishop of Paderborn, to undertake in collaboration with Franz Kaulen (1st ed., Cologne, 1852-3; 2nd and 3rd ed.
www.newadvent.org /cathen/08522a.htm   (1532 words)

  
 Wars between the Jews and Romans
This Menahem was the son or the grandson of Judas the Galilean, who had led an anti-Roman revolt in 6 CE; two of his relatives had been crucified after a similar disturbance.
This may have been a Jewish success, but it was clear that the Romans would return with a larger army, and many people left Jerusalem, leaving it in the hands of the radicals.
The Romans had paused their attacks for some time, there was a civil war, and at the other end of the empire, the Batavians had revolted, and a new emperor, Julius Sabinus, had been proclaimed in Gaul.
www.livius.org /ja-jn/jewish_wars/jwar03.html   (1748 words)

  
 Hebrews, Great Jewish Revolt: Siege And Destruction Of Jerusalem
Great Jewish Revolt: Siege And Destruction Of Jerusalem
revolt by the exactions of the procurator Gessius Florus.
Great Jewish Revolt: Seige And Destruction Of Jerusalem
history-world.org /great_jewish_revolt.htm   (5835 words)

  
 Hebrews, Great Jewish Revolt: Siege And Destruction Of Jerusalem   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-16)
Great Jewish Revolt: Siege And Destruction Of Jerusalem
revolt by the exactions of the procurator Gessius Florus.
Great Jewish Revolt: Seige And Destruction Of Jerusalem
ragz-international.com /great_jewish_revolt.htm   (5835 words)

  
 The Jerusalem Archaeological Park - homepage
In 66 CE, when the Great (first) Jewish Revolt broke out, Josephus was entrusted with the defence of the Galilee by the Sanhedrin (the Jewish legal authority).
Josephus dedicated the rest of his life to historical recording, and his works are the most important source for the study of the Jewish history during the Second Temple period.
This book describes in length the history of the Jewish people, from the Hasmonean period until the end of the Great (first) Jewish Revolt.
www.archpark.org.il /biography.asp?id=8   (420 words)

  
 TCI Review   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-16)
In the wake of the unsuccessful Second Jewish Revolt in 135 CE [AD] the name Palaestina was imposed on Judea in an attempt by the Romans to minimize Jewish identification with the land of Israel.
In Jewish sources (such as the Torah, Talmud, Mishnah, rabbinic writings, poetry, folk songs and liturgy) the name of the land is “Israel,” the “Land of Israel,” the “Land of Zion,” or “Judea.” The term “Palestine” is not to be found.
After the Romans crushed the Second Great Jewish Revolt (at least one more rebellion occurred almost a century later), the name Palaestina was imposed on Judea in an attempt by the Romans to minimize Jewish identification with the land of Israel.
schoolpropaganda.us /TCI_final_report.htm   (7023 words)

  
 The Masada Myth: Heroes of the Jewish Great Revolt were not really heroes
Masada was part of a much larger Jewish revolt against the Roman Empire between the years 66-73.
That revolt ended in disaster and in bitter defeat for the Jews.
Prior to the beginning of the revolt, Masada was taken over by force—probably by the Sicarii (headed by Manachem) in 66 A.D., (e.g., see Cotton and Preiss 1990).
www.bibleinterp.com /articles/masadamyth2.htm   (449 words)

  
 The Jewish Revolt: Caligula vs. the Jews   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-16)
The Zealots were a group of Jewish radicals (nowadays, the apt term to describe them would probably be "terrorists").
According to The World History of the Jewish People: The Herodian Period, "The memory of Caligula's decrees and the fear of a renewed threat of similar calamities henceforth cast a shadow on Judeo-Roman relations." (Avi-Yonah 139) It is quite clear that Caligula's act seems to have been unprecedented and was a grave strategic mistake.
It seems only fair (from the Greeks' point of view) that "the Greeks invaded the Jewish quarter itself and, forcing their way into its synagogues, erected statue a statue of Caligula in every one of them." (Grant 123) This act, as aggressive as it sounds, was a logical one.
www.vanguardnewsnetwork.com /2004b/42704vonhoffmeistercaligula.htm   (2099 words)

  
 Great Soviet Encyclopedia [Definition]   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-16)
The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (Russian: Большая Советская Энциклопедия, БСЭ, Bolshaya Sovetskaya Entsiklopediya) is the largest and most comprehensive encyclopedia in Russian, issued by the Soviet Encyclopedia state publisher.
January 10 - United Nations takes control of the free city of Trieste January 24 - Demetrios Maximos founds monarchist government in Athens January 25 - Philippinean plane crashes in Hong Kong with $5 million worth of gold and money January 29 - -26 degrees Celsius in Britain...
[click for more] each year the Yearbook of the Great Soviet Encyclopedia was released, with up to date articles about the Soviet UnionSoviet Union (1922-1991) was a short name for The Union of Soviet Socialist Republics (USSR).(Russian: Сою́з Сове́тских Социалисти́ческих Респу́блик (СССР); tr.: Soyuz Sovetskikh Sotsialisticheskikh Respublik (SSSR)), also called the Sovie...
www.wikimirror.com /Great_Soviet_Encyclopedia   (845 words)

  
 Ko_Kosher_Service
After his death and the fragmentation of his empire, the city passed to Ptolemy the first of Egypt, until in 198 BC it was captured by Antiochus III, making it part of the Syrian empire.
The Maccabbees led a revolt against his rule in the years 167-165 BC, and established the Hashemonian kingdom there, until in 63 BC the city was captured by the Romans under Ptolemy.
The first Jewish revolt against Rome in 70 AD was crushed, and it was followed in 135 AD by a second revolt, after which the Romans exiled the Jews.
www.ko-kosher-service.org /jerusalem.htm   (687 words)

  
 History: Jewish Bar Kochba Revolt
The Jewish revolt led by Bar Kochba in 132 AD was not the work of a single if a single radical revolutionary.
It was the inevitable result of years of promises not kept to the Jews, and laws which suppressed the basis of Jews as a nation.
Even if Bar Kochba did not exist a revolt would have still occurred maybe with a different date and a different leader, but a revolt was inescapable.
www.cyberessays.com /History/95.htm   (1687 words)

  
 Dead Sea Scrolls   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-16)
This course surveys the history of the Jewish people from the biblical era through the early rabbinic period (c.
Thus, major events such as the building of the first and second Temples, the Maccabeean revolt, and the Roman conquest of Judea will be discussed in reference to such concepts as kingship and messianism, nationalism, and "sectarianism".
These readings will include selections from Josephus (a general in the Great Jewish Revolt against Rome), texts from among the Dead Sea Scrolls, and Apocryphal writings, as well as biblical and rabbinic texts.
www.nyu.edu /fas/program/religiousstudies/undergrad/DeadSeaScrolls.htm   (198 words)

  
 Josephus   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-16)
100) was a 1st century Jewish historian of priestly and royal ancestry who survived and recorded the Destruction of Jerusalem in 70 and settled in Rome.
Josephus wrote an account of the Great Jewish Revolt addressed to the Jewish community in Mesopotamia in the Aramaic languageAramaic language.
His history of the Great Jewish Revolt, though questionable, contradictory or self-serving in many places, is an important source of information for the events of that time.
www.infothis.com /find/Josephus   (783 words)

  
 The Great Jewish Revolt
In 66 B.C. the Jewish people revolted against the tyranny of Rome and put up a remarkable resistance before they were finally crushed.
And it isn't just the absence of considerable skeletal remains, but also the fact that, in Jewish religion, suicide is considered a great sin.
Neither Jerusalem, its population dead or dispersed, nor the Jewish Temple were rebuilt.
www.buzzle.com /editorials/4-21-2004-53227.asp?viewPage=4   (297 words)

  
 Temple Models.com Replica Model of Masada
Built by King Herod, Masada, the last Jewish stronghold during the great revolt against the Romans, lies on top of a cliff in the Judean desert.
Masada, the last Jewish stronghold during the great revolt against the Romans, lies on top of a cliff in the Judean desert.
In the year 66 CE in the midst of the revolt against Romans, Jewish soldiers occupied Masada and settled there with their families.
www.templemodels.com /masada   (348 words)

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