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Topic: Great Kanto earthquake


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In the News (Fri 19 Jul 19)

  
  The Foreigner - Japan FAQts
Due to the shape of Japan, which is stretched from north to south, there is a great difference between the climate in the north and in the south.
The most recent heavy earthquake was the Great Hanshin Earthquake which occured in Kobe on January 17th, 1995.
The earthquake, with a magnitude of 8.3, and subsequent fires claimed 142,800 lives.
www.theforeigner-japan.com /faqts   (1819 words)

  
 Spartanburg SC | GoUpstate.com | Spartanburg Herald-Journal
Because the earthquake struck at lunchtime when many people were using fire to cook food, the damage and the number of fatalities were amplified due to fires which broke out in numerous locations.
Earthquake preparation literature in modern Japan almost always directs citizens to "carry a portable radio and use it to listen to reliable information, and to be misled by rumours" in the event of a big quake.
It is possible that the earthquake caused the Japanese people to feel unsafe in their homeland, which may have combined with the rise of imperialism in Japan, to create the idea of getting safer lands by conquest, such as China.
www.goupstate.com /apps/pbcs.dll/section?category=NEWS&template=wiki&text=Great_Kanto_Earthquake   (1515 words)

  
 The 1923 Great Kanto (Tokyo) Earthquake and Fire
Not long after the earthquake, the Government Fishery Institute and the Hydrographical Department of the Navy undertook separate missions to survey the sea floor in the area of the quake at a depth of 600 to 800 fathoms.
An unusual characteristic of the Great Kanto earthquake was the dramatic upheaval and depression of the ground.
When the earthquake struck, coal or charcoal cooking stoves were in use throughout Tokyo and Yokohama in preparation for the noon-time meal and fires sprang up everywhere within moments of the quake.
civserv.ing.unibs.it /users/riva/Sismica/Terremoti/Tokyo/yokohama.html   (3768 words)

  
 Asia Times Online - The trusted news source for information on Japan
What is common in a comparison with the Great Hanshin Earthquake, which was much stronger at magnitude 7.8, is mainly that the government and the local population paid little attention to the threat of a major shake.
The Great Kanto Quake numbers: The official death toll in the region that included Tokyo and Yokohama, the hardest-hit cities, is 142,807 dead or missing, with 103,733 injured, according to Kodansha's history of Japan, which used the official figures.
Masakazu Otake, president of the government-funded Coordinating Committee for Earthquake Prediction, said he had been anticipating that a major earthquake with a maximum magnitude of 7.5 would rock the Chuetsu region in gap D, the area from Niigata prefecture to the northern part of Nagano prefecture, where crust stresses were known to be building up.
www.atimes.com /atimes/Japan/FJ27Dh01.html   (1391 words)

  
 Earthquake - Free net encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Most earthquakes are tectonic, but they also occur in volcanic regions and as the result of a number of anthropogenic sources, such as reservoir induced seismicity, mining and the removal or injection of fluids into the crust.
Deep focus earthquakes, at depths of hundreds of kilometres, are possibly generated as subducted lithospheric material catastrophically undergoes a phase transition since at the pressures and temperatures present at such depth elastic strain cannot be supported.
Earthquakes have also been known to be caused by the removal of natural gas from subsurface deposits, for instance in the northern Netherlands.
www.netipedia.com /index.php/Earthquake   (2367 words)

  
 Earthquake - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Earthquakes occurring at boundaries of tectonic plates are called interplate earthquakes, while the less frequent events that occur in the interior of the lithospheric plates are called intraplate earthquakes.
Earthquakes have also been known to be caused by the removal of natural gas from subsurface deposits, for instance in the northern Netherlands.
Earthquakes that occur below sea level and have large vertical displacements can give rise to tsunamis, either as a direct result of the deformation of the sea bed due to the earthquake or as a result of submarine landslides directly or indirectly triggered by the quake.
www.knowledgehunter.info /wiki/Earthquakes   (3065 words)

  
 1923 Great Kanto earthquake at AllExperts
The struck the Kanto plain on the Japanese main island of Honshu at 11:58 on the morning of September 1, 1923.
Because the earthquake struck at lunchtime when many people were using fire to cook food, the damage and the number of fatalities were amplified due to fires which broke out in numerous locations.
Earthquake preparation literature in modern Japan almost always direct citizens to "carry a portable radio and use it to listen to reliable information, and do not be misled by rumours" in the event of a big quake.
en.allexperts.com /e/0/1923_great_kanto_earthquake.htm   (1249 words)

  
 MapDig - 2004 Indian Ocean earthquake
This earthquake was also reported to be the longest duration of faulting ever observed, lasting between 500 and 600 seconds (8.3 to 10 minutes), and it was large enough that it caused the entire planet to vibrate as much as half an inch, or over a centimetre.
Great earthquakes such as the Sumatra-Andaman event, which are invariably associated with megathrust events in subduction zones, have seismic moments that can account for a significant fraction of the global earthquake moment across century-scale time periods.
The deadliest earthquakes since 1900 were the Tangshan, China earthquake of 1976, in which at least 255,000 were killed; the earthquake of 1927 in Xining, Qinghai, China (200,000); the Great Kanto earthquake which struck Tokyo in 1923 (143,000); and the Gansu, China, earthquake of 1920 (200,000).
www.mapdig.com /?title=2004_Indian_Ocean_earthquake   (7310 words)

  
 [No title]
Earthquake resistant design and emergency preparedness in Tokyo are based in large part on a repeat of the 1923 earthquake.
Faulting during the 1923 Kanto earthquake was interpreted as reverse, right-lateral faulting on a low-angle plane along the the Sagami Trough, the plate boundary between the northeastern edge of the Philippine Sea plate and the southeastern edge of the Eurasian plate (Figure 1).
Although the planar fault approximation may be a simplification of the true rupture surface, it is consistent with the geometry of the Pacific and Philippines Sea plates beneath the Kanto District as determined by Ishida (1992) on the basis of the regional seismicity, focal mechanisms, and seismic velocity structure.
pasadena.wr.usgs.gov /office/wald/Kanto/paper.html   (6042 words)

  
 Jody Clark   (Site not responding. Last check: )
After the earthquake, only about one percent of Tokyo’s buildings were severely damaged, mostly in the older downtown areas where the ground was swampy.
An unusual characteristic of the Kanto earthquake was the dramatic upheaval and depression of the ground.
The Great Kanto Earthquake of 1923 was one of the most devastating in history, not because of the actual quake, but because of the events following.
web.bryant.edu /~dlm1/sc262/cases/japanearthquake.htm   (1588 words)

  
 Alaska Engineering ~ Mark D. Anderson, P.E.
In the small earthquake, the structure itself should not have sustained any damage, and its motions during the shaking should be so minor that there is little evidence of damage in the finishes and contents of the structure.
In Japan, in general, the initial cost of modern earthquake code compliant structures is expected to be relatively higher, with an offsetting long-term recovery due to the reduced economic consequences of damage due to large earthquakes.
While these higher earthquake performance goals can be envisioned and implemented in different ways, in essence they generally result in designing structures for a higher percentage of the actual forces and motions expected in the design level earthquake, with greater attention to detail and quality control through design and construction.
www.alaskaengineer.com /viewpoints/earthquake_engineering.html   (1798 words)

  
 ScienceDaily: Tsunami Articles
The 1923 Great Kanto earthquake struck the Kanto plain on the Japanese main island of Honshu at 11:58 on the morning of September 1, 1923.
The 2004 Indian Ocean earthquake, known by the scientific community as the Sumatra-Andaman earthquake, was an undersea earthquake that occurred at 00:58:53 UTC (07:58:53 local time) on December 26,...
Earthquakes are accordingly measured with a seismometer, commonly known as a...
www.sciencedaily.com /articles/earth_climate/tsunamis   (596 words)

  
 TSUNAMI FROM EARTHQUAKE
Each of these megathrust earthquakes also spawned tsunamis (in the Pacific Ocean), but the death toll from these was significantly lower — a few thousand for the worst one — probably because of the lower population density along the coasts near affected areas and the much greater distances to more populated coasts.
The exact amount is yet undetermined, but theoretical models suggest the earthquake may have shortened the length of a day by as much as three microseconds (3 µs) and caused the Earth to minutely "wobble" on its axis by up to 2.5 cm (1 inch).
The earthquake was the fourth most powerful recorded since 1900, and the confirmed death toll so far is 175,000, in large part due to the ensuing tsunami.
home.123india.com /alokghosh/fillers4/tsunami_from_earthquake.htm   (2913 words)

  
 Earthquakes of Japan   (Site not responding. Last check: )
The Great Kanto Earthquake took place 78 years ago and was considered the worst earthquake in the world.
This earthquake hit the Kanto plain and destroyed Tokyo, Yokohama and the surrounding areas.
Over 140,000 people dies due to the earthquake and the fires that were caused by it.
www.owlnet.rice.edu /~geol108/eq4/earthquakes_of_japan.htm   (78 words)

  
 1923 Great Kanto earthquake
Because the earthquake struck at lunchtime when many people were using fire to cook food, the damage and the number of fatalities were amplified due to fires which broke out in numerous locations.
The panic and confusion created by the earthquake led to numerous false rumours spreading both inside and outside of the affected regions.
Earthquake preparation posters and literature published in modern Japan almost always direct citizens to "carry a portable radio and use it to listen to reliable information, and do not be misled by rumours" in the event of a big quake.
www.friedensgasse.ch   (1145 words)

  
 Assessing earthquake probability in Greater Tokyo   (Site not responding. Last check: )
The scientific objective of this project is the development of a comprehensive description and understanding of earthquake occurrence in Greater Tokyo which will lead to time-dependent probabilistic forecasts for large earthquakes striking the region during the coming years to decades.
A 400-year record of large earthquakes in and around Tokyo together with the availability of records from the most advanced instrumental seismic and geodetic networks in the world will provide an ideal testing and validation environment.
The uniqueness and originality of this study is expected to complement and contribute to a landmark project being undertaken by the Japanese government and the Japan Earthquake Research Institute to produce the comprehensive national earthquake probability map of Japan by mid-2005.
www.swissre.com /INTERNET/pwswpspr.nsf/alldocbyidkeylu/ULUR-5PQHR3?OpenDocument   (556 words)

  
 Kanto Earthquake
The Great Kanto Earthquake was one of the worst natural desasters in the history of mankind and the worst known earthquake in the history of the Japanese islands.
On September 1, 1923 two minutes before noon, a devastating earthquake hit the densely populated area of Tokyo and Yokohama.
Today the Kanto Earthquake Museum inside a temple preserves the memory of those who died.
www.artelino.com /articles/kanto_earthquake.asp   (932 words)

  
 KobeCityInfo.com - Great Hanshin Awaji Earthquake -
An earthquake with a 7.2 on the Richter scale, hit the city of Kobe.
This earthquake which is know as the Great Hanshin-Awaji earthquake (or the Hanshin-Awaij-daishinsai), was the worst earthquake in Japan since the great Kanto earthquake in 1923, in which 140.000 people died.
On the day of the earthquake more then 100 fire’s broke out, but due the lack of water and the interruption of the transportation access, the fire service was not effective in putting out the fire’s.
www.kobecityinfo.com /ghae.html   (494 words)

  
 Great Kanto earthquake - Definition, explanation
Great Kanto Earthquake (関東大震災 Kantō daishinsai) struck the Kanto plain on the Japanese main island of Honshu at 11:58 on the morning of September 1, 1923.
The quake was later estimated to have had a magnitude between 7.9 and 8.3 on the Richter scale.
The chaos and panic created by the earthquake led to rumours of Koreans looting and committing arson.
www.calsky.com /lexikon/en/txt/g/gr/great_kanto_earthquake.php   (549 words)

  
 AGU Web Site: Kobe Earthquake: An Urban Disaster
The focal mechanism of the earthquake indicates right-lateral strike-slip faulting on a vertical fault striking slightly east of northeast, parallel to the strike of the mapped faults.
All of these earthquakes, as well as the 1995 earthquake, had strike-slip mechanisms that accommodated east-west shortening of the Eurasian plate due to its collision with the North American plate along the Izu-Itoigawa line to the east in central Honshu [Huzita, 1980].
Although the 1994 Northridge earthquake occurred within an urban region, almost all of the fault rupture occurred at depths greater than 10 km, and the great majority of the multistory buildings in the San Fernando Valley were at least 20 km from the closest part of the fault rupture.
www.agu.org /sci_soc/kobe.html   (1881 words)

  
 Brown University Department of East Asian Studies
Such an approach, and the decision to construct the book around the earthquake, owes a great deal to recent scholarship on the transformative effects of disaster and terror, and on the exercise of power in their aftermath.
Histories of the earthquake and subsequent acts of violence have tended to be overshadowed by the immensity of the destruction inflicted by Japan on the rest of Asia, and the destruction experienced by Japan itself in 1945.
It isn't until the 1960s, as preparations to mark the fortieth anniversary of the earthquake were underway, that groups of historians, former colleagues and in some instances students of murdered activists, and witnesses to the post-disaster violence began to organize public events and to publish their research findings on the killings and the trials.
www.brown.edu /Departments/East_Asian_Studies/facultypage.php?id=10102   (2246 words)

  
 Casualty, damage estimates of great quakes revised upward
The upward revisions are due to the incorporation of the latest information from the 1994 Northridge earthquake in California and the 1995 Kobe, Japan, earthquake into a detailed analysis performed by Haresh C. Shah, professor of civil engineering at Stanford, and associates at Risk Management Solutions Inc. (RMS) of Menlo Park.
Reoccurrence of the 7.9 magnitude Great Kanto Earthquake, which destroyed Tokyo in 1923 and killed 140,000, could result in 30,000 to 60,000 deaths, 80,000 to 100,000 serious injuries, and economic losses totaling between $2.1 trillion and $3.3 trillion.
They assume that the largest earthquakes considered likely to occur in the next 30 to 50 years would strike as close as possible to the most highly developed areas in the three locations.
www.stanford.edu /dept/news/pr/96/960110greatquake.html   (1292 words)

  
 Japan Sessions   (Site not responding. Last check: )
When a devastating earthquake struck Japan’s greater Kanto plain on the morning of September 1, 1923, it leveled the foundations of the nation’s capital and paralyzed every aspect of the complex infrastructure that had come to be centered there.
This paper explores the construction of popular narratives, in the aftermath of September 1, identifying the causes of the Great Kanto Earthquake and the destruction of Yokohama, Tokyo, and nearby communities.
When the Great Kanto Earthquake created an immense, urgent need for new housing in the greater Tokyo metropolitan area, Tokyo-based commercial women’s magazines were quick on the ground to respond, first with solutions for immediate concerns like heating for temporary housing, then with more lasting suggestions for rebuilding a fire- and earthquake-resistant urban fabric.
www.aasianst.org /absts/2005abst/Japan/j-206.htm   (1198 words)

  
 Great Kanto earthquake - Education - Information - Educational Resources - Encyclopedia - Music
The quake was later estimated to have had a magnitude of 7.9 on the Richter scale.
The damage is estimated to exceed one billion U.S. dollars at the time of the earthquake.
In 1960, September 1st was designated as Disaster Prevention Day to commemorate the earthquake and remind people of the importance of preparation as October and September are the middle of the typhoon season.
www.music.us /education/G/Great-Kanto-earthquake.htm   (648 words)

  
 Search Results for "Kanto"
2 Sept. 1 The GREAT KANTO EARTHQUAKE was followed by fierce fires in Tokyo, Yokohama, and neighboring...
Most important of these is the Kanto or Kwanto Plain (c.5,000 sq mi/12,950 sq km) in the central part of...
Yayoi replaced Jomon, beginning in Kyushu and moving toward the Kanto plain where it arrived by the end of the 1st century B.C.E. Yayoi...
www.bartleby.com /cgi-bin/texis/webinator/sitesearch?FILTER=&query=Kanto   (234 words)

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