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Topic: Great Shearwater


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  Great Shearwater - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The Great Shearwater (Puffinus gravis) is a large shearwater in the seabird family Procellariidae.
The Great Shearwater feeds on fish and squid, which it catches from the surface or by plunge-diving.
The Great Shearwater breeds in huge colonies, nesting in burrows which are visited only at night to avoid predation by large gulls.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Great_Shearwater   (304 words)

  
 Great Shearwater -- Facts, Info, and Encyclopedia article   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-06)
The Great Shearwater (Puffinus gravis) is a large (Long-winged oceanic bird that in flight skims close to the waves) shearwater in the (A bird that frequents coastal waters and the open ocean: gulls; pelicans; gannets; cormorants; albatrosses; petrels; etc.) seabird family (Petrels; fulmars; shearwaters;) Procellariidae.
The Great Shearwater feeds on (Any of various mostly cold-blooded aquatic vertebrates usually having scales and breathing through gills) fish and (Widely distributed fast-moving ten-armed cephalopod mollusk having a long tapered body with triangular tail fins) squid, which it catches from the surface or by plunge-diving.
The Great Shearwater breeds in huge colonies, nesting in burrows which are visited only at night to avoid predation by large (Mostly white aquatic bird having long pointed wings and short legs) gulls.
www.absoluteastronomy.com /encyclopedia/g/gr/great_shearwater.htm   (323 words)

  
 [No title]
The main confusion species for Great Shearwater is Cory’s although it is possible, because of their different manner of flight, to confuse Great with other smaller species of shearwater or Fulmar.
Another distinction, which is of less use on distant birds, is that Great Shearwaters have darker markings on the underparts, specifically on the shoulder, on the belly and some dark spots or bars on the inner underwing.
The flight is typical of a shearwater with a few short wing beats followed by a long glide and banking, the height and frequency of which depends largely on wind conditions.
www.biscay-dolphin.org.uk /top/birds.html   (4035 words)

  
 Shearwater
There are more than 20 species of shearwaters, three larger species in the genus Calonectris, and 19 smaller species in the genus Puffinus.
These tubenose birds fly with stiff wings, and use a “shearing” flight technique to move across wave fronts with the minimum of active flight.
Shearwaters are part of the family Procellariidae, which also includes fulmars, prions and petrels.
www.wordlookup.net /sh/shearwater.html   (241 words)

  
 Encyclopedia: Bird migration   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-06)
A mechanism which can lead to great rarities turning up as vagrants thousands of kilometres out of range is reverse migration, where the genetic programming of young birds fails to work properly.
The most pelagic species, mainly in the 'tubenose' order Procellariiformes, are great wanderers, and the albatrosses of the southern oceans may circle the globe as they ride the "roaring forties" outside the breeding season.
A few seabirds, such as Wilson's Petrel and Great Shearwater, breed in the southern hemisphere and migrate north in the southern winter.
www.nationmaster.com /encyclopedia/bird-migration   (4916 words)

  
 PBS - The Voyage of the Odyssey - Track the Voyage - ATLANTIC OCEAN
Great Shearwaters are a large, powerful, brown and white seabird.
The Great Shearwater is believed to number somewhere between 2-4 million and breeds in the southern Atlantic Ocean on the Falkland Islands, Tristan da Cunha and Gough Island, thousands of miles from Odyssey's current position.
As with many Antarctic species, perhaps we are encountering the Great Shearwater avoiding the rigors of winter by moving north.
www.pbs.org /odyssey/odyssey/20050530_log_transcript.html   (1069 words)

  
 Plastic Ingestion and PCBs in Seabirds: Is There a Relationship ? Marine Pollution Bulletin, Volume 19, No. 4. pp, ...   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-06)
Great Shearwaters are particularly suitable study animals, because they contain very high levels of ingested plastic, a large proportion of which is manufactured (user) plastic (Ryan, 1988), the type with the highest levels of PCBs and other toxic chemical additives (Gregory, 1978; van Franeker, 1985).
Twenty female Great Shearwaters and their eggs were collected within two days of laying eggs at Gough Island (40° 21'S, 9° 53'W), South Atlantic Ocean, between 9 and 12 November 1984.
Plastic was present in 19 (95%) female Great Shearwaters sampled, and there was large variation in plastic loads and OC concentrations in fat tissue and eggs (Table 1).
www.mindfully.org /Plastic/Ocean/Plastic-Ingestion-PCBs1apr88.htm   (2324 words)

  
 New England Seabirds - Breeding grounds of the Greater Shearwater on the islands of Tristan da Cunha and Gough.
New England Seabirds - Breeding grounds of the Greater Shearwater on the islands of Tristan da Cunha and Gough.
The majority of Greater Shearwaters breed on the volcanic islands of Inaccessible, Nightingale, and Gough Island of the Tristan da Cunha group.
The continued health of the world population of Greater Shearwaters is dependent upon these islands.
www.neseabirds.com /sheargreatmap.htm   (617 words)

  
 Birding Madeira - Recent sightings
Manx Shearwater: 100+ seen at Porto Moniz on 4th September, 100+ at Porto Moniz on 6th, 50+ at Porto Moniz on 7th, 200+ at Porto Moniz on 8th and 100's at Porto Moniz on 10th.
Manx Shearwater: 2 Porto Moniz 25/8 and 5 Porto Moniz 27/8
Manx Shearwater: 3 Funchal (Lido) 5/8 and 4+ Porto Moniz 6/8.
madeira.seawatching.net /recent.html   (7011 words)

  
 Great Shearwater - Lowestoft, September 1990
The Great Shearwater pictured above was photographed from the MV Scillonian III during the August 2000 pelagic.
This was rather disappointing as I thought this was one of the most distinctive aspects of the plumage of Great Shearwater, which I now suspected the bird to be.
As the shearwater approached the outfall pandemonium broke out amongst the smaller gulls, causing them to take evasive action, flying high into the sky much as they do when a skua approaches.
home.clara.net /ammodytes/greatshearwater.htm   (1040 words)

  
 Shearwater Identification
This Shearwater was photographed during the Memorial Weekend (end of May) 1994, near 'The Point', a nutrient rich area on the edge of the Gulf Stream off Manteo, North Carolina.
I don't know anything about molt in Audubon's, but worn shearwaters of a particular species can be seen at almost any time of year, because of differences in molt timing in age classes and the fact that some (probably unhealthy birds) don't molt at all.
On Greater Shearwater it is invariably a distinct, smooth delineation sweeping in one neat motion through the 'face' and over the back of the head, leaving a distinct white slash intruding almost around the back of the neck.
www.oceanwanderers.com /Shearwaterdisc.html   (3139 words)

  
 Bird migration Article, Birdmigration Information   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-06)
A mechanism which can lead to great rarities turning up as vagrants thousands of kilometres out of range is reverse migration, where the genetic programming of young birds fails towork properly.
The most pelagic species, mainly in the 'tubenose' order Procellariiformes, are great wanderers, and the albatrosses of the southern oceans may circle the globe as they ride the "roaring forties" outside the breedingseason.
A few seabirds, like Wilson's Petrel, and Great Shearwater are amongst the few species that breed in the southernhemisphere and migrate north in the southern winter.
www.anoca.org /species/long/bird_migration.html   (2057 words)

  
 New England Seabirds - Greater Shearwater Puffinus gravis
Greater Shearwaters often sit on the water in large flocks of 50 to 100 birds.
In April and May, the Greater Shearwater leaves the breeding grounds and migrates north crossing the ocean to vacation in the north east Atlantic including the Gulf of Maine where we see large numbers of them on Stellwagen Bank.
Greater Shearwater has a brown-fl patch on belly which is very hard to observe at sea.
www.neseabirds.com /sheargreat.htm   (415 words)

  
 [No title]
Total counts of Cory’s Shearwater during surveys along fixed transects in the English Channel and Bay of Biscay, 2000 Great Shearwater Puffinus gravis Breeds on islands in South Atlantic, and undertakes a transequatorial migration route into the North Atlantic, after the breeding season (Cramp 1977).
Great Shearwaters reach the Atlantic coast of North America in May and June, before moving eastwards to European waters during July and August.
Total counts of Balearic Shearwater during surveys along fixed transects in the English Channel and Bay of Biscay, 2000 Little Shearwater Puffinus assimilis Previously considered to be accidental in the survey area, but records suggest regular presence in the Bay of Biscay during late summer.
www.orcaweb.org.uk /downloads/2000BayofBiscayBirdReport.doc   (2453 words)

  
 Annotated List of the Seabirds of the World -- Great Shearwater
They refused all sorts of food; and as they were unpleasant pets, they were set at liberty.
To my great surprise, instead of flying directly off, as I expected, they launched toward the water, dived several yards obliquely, and on coming to the surface, splashed and washed themselves for several minutes before they took to wing, when they flew away with their usual ease and grace."
Greater Shearwater photographed in the Gulf Stream off North Carolina in August 1996 during a pelagic trip with Brian Patteson Inc.
www.oceanwanderers.com /GreatShear.html   (282 words)

  
 Great shearwater - The Royal Society for the Protection of Birds
Great shearwater - The Royal Society for the Protection of Birds
A large shearwater, about the same size as a fulmar.
It has dark grey-brown upperparts and pale underparts with a distinctive dark cap and pale neck, as well as dark underwing edges.
www.rspb.org.uk /birds/guide/g/greatshearwater/index.asp   (138 words)

  
 Bird migration
Recent research suggests that long-distance passerine migrants are of South American and African, rather than northern hemisphere, evolutionary origins.
A few seabirds, like Wilson's Petrel, and Great Shearwater are amongst the few species that breed in the southern hemisphere and migrate north in the southern winter.
In broad, Australasian birds tend to be sedantry or nomadic, moving on whenever conditions become unfavourable, to whichever area happens to be more suitable at the time.
www.brainyencyclopedia.com /encyclopedia/b/bi/bird_migration.html   (2143 words)

  
 [No title]
The Great Shearwater is a large and powerfully built, brown and white bird, with a distinctive brown cap, white cheeks and an incomplete white nape collar.
During the whaling era in the South Atlantic this Shearwater could often be seen following the whaling and fishing boats, having learnt that edible scraps are thrown overboard.
During the nesting season the Great Shearwater emits strident and continuous wails the significance of which is unknown.
www.sgisland.org /pages/environ/b_visitors.htm   (608 words)

  
 Aug 05   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-06)
Seawatching (to 08:00): 1 Manx Shearwater, 230 Teal, 1 Wigeon, 1 Great Skua and 75 Common Terns.
Seawatching: 1 Great Crested Grebe, 20 Manx Shearwaters, 6 Sooty Shearwaters, 1 Great Skua and 26 Arctic Skuas.
Seawatching: 1 Sooty Shearwater, 34 Manx Shearwater, 58 Common Scoter, 2 Velvet Scoter and 3 Arctic Skuas.
whitburnbirding.co.uk /Aug05.htm   (700 words)

  
 Shearwaters in the Bay of Biscay   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-06)
Great Shearwater taking off in front of the boat.
Mainly Great Shearwaters with a few Cory's and also a Sooty Shearwater in the middle.
Great Shearwaters take flight in front of the Ferry.
www.birdfoto.fsnet.co.uk /biscay/shearwaters.html   (69 words)

  
 Submission No:371   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-06)
This submission concerns a Shearwater seen on the 7th April 2002 during an organised pelagic excursion from Port Fairy in western Victoria (38º 47.55'S 141º 48.50'E).
There are several other large shearwaters with pale ventral surfaces (Buller's Shearwater, Streaked Shearwater, Cory's Shearwater and Pink-footed Shearwater) but none has a similar combination of characters (Lindsey 1986; Harrison 1987; Marchant and Higgins 1990; Enticott and Tipling 1997)".
Despite the brevity of the sighting committee members had no difficultly accepting this record, doing so unanimously, taking note of the observers experience and the ease with which this species can be identified when seen well enough.
users.bigpond.net.au /palliser/barc/case371.html   (347 words)

  
 BAY OF BISCAY 6-9 SEPTEMBER 2003
Our first Great Shearwater was seen at 1.29 pm and we were treated to several more during the afternoon, including a group of four off the port side that gave great views.
Stalwart members of the group continued to watch from the relative shelter of the starboard side and saw a Balearic Shearwater fly past, but heavy rain and breaking waves resulted in no sightings of anything until the evening, when blows from large animals, presumably Fin Whales, were seen in the heavy sea.
However, the power and magnificence of the ocean was apparent for all to see, and sightings of five species of shearwater and a very rare cetacean will hopefully inspire many of you to try again some time in the future.
home.btconnect.com /wildwings/biscay60903tr.html   (1329 words)

  
 Great Shearwater in the Bay of Biscay   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-06)
Great Shearwater in the Bay of Biscay in September 2000
This animation comprises eight photos of a Great Shearwater as it flew alongside the bow of the Ferry in September 2000.
The sea was flat calm on the return trip from Santander and the reflection of the shearwater can be seen.
www.birdfoto.fsnet.co.uk /biscay/greatshear.html   (59 words)

  
 August of 1995   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-06)
Great White Egret, E. alba, Nummi-Pusula, 2-20.8, was scared off when the hunting began.
Great Northern Diver -- Gavia immer The earlier reported immature was still at Texel on 5th.
Great Northern Diver -- Gavia immer An immature bird is still frequenting the eastern shores of the island of Texel (NW).
ebn.unige.ch /ebn/obs/ebn_8_95.html   (3499 words)

  
 BONGARILIITTO
WP species (Sooty Shearwater) and immediately for the sake he picked up three small Bailey’s from his backpack to celebrate the moment.
Manx Shearwater movement was strong and it became very intense between 5-6pm.
Irish group confirmed that it was a Great Shearwater based on its jizz, as its jizz did not fit to Cory’s Shearwater.
www.bongariliitto.fi /matkakertomukset/Irlanti/Irlanti_2004-08_Haataja.html   (3294 words)

  
 Senegal - Seabird species
The ultimate time for a great mix of seabirds on migration is probably between the beginning of October and the middle of November.
The size and jizz of Scopoli's and Cory's Shearwaters are very similar and they are difficult to distinguish in field, especially compared to Cape Verde Shearwater which is a more straightforward identification matter.
All birds have been identified as the subspecies boydi (also known as Boyd's Shearwater), which breeds on the Cape Verde Islands where the population is estimated to amount to several thousands of pairs.
senegal.seawatching.net /seabirds.html   (3039 words)

  
 Thrasher's Blog: Mountain Goats: Lee's Palace, Toronto, May 11, 2005
The Mountain Goats and Shearwater played a gig at Lee's Palace in Toronto on Thursday, May 11.
Three-quarters of the way through they brought out members of Shearwater to fill out the sound for the remainder of the main set, but even their contributions were kept relatively sparse.
All in all it sounded great, and hearing the songs performed live only reinforces the fact that Darnielle is one of the best songwriters around.
thrashersblog.com /2005/05/mountain-goats-lees-palace-toronto-may.html   (304 words)

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