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Topic: Greater Poland Voivodship


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In the News (Sun 21 Apr 19)

  
  Voivodships in Poland - Exploring Poland
Kujawsko-Pomorskie Voivodship - is a fusion of the former voivodships Bydgoszcz, Turuń en Włocławek and is situated in central-northern Poland.
Mazowsze Voivodship - is a fusion of the former voivodships Warszawa, Płock, Ciechanów, Ostrołęka, Siedlce and Radom.
Lower Silesia Voivodship - is a fusion of the former voivodships Legnica, Wałbrzych and Jelenia Góra, and is situated in the southwest of Poland.
www.exploringpoland.com /poland/voivodships.jsp   (1419 words)

  
  Greater Poland - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Greater Poland (also Great Poland; Polish: Wielkopolska, German: Grosspolen, Latin: Polonia Maior) is one of the historical regions of Poland.
Greater Poland (Wielkopolska) was the core of the early medieval Polish state, often called the cradle of Poland, and at times was called simply Poland (in Latin: Polonia).
The name of the region can be understool as the Old Poland as opposed to the New Poland (Lesser Poland, Małopolska, Polonia Minor, a region in south-eastern Poland with Kraków as its capital) and in opposition to the whole Poland as a state and country.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Greater_Poland   (216 words)

  
 Poland - Encyclopedia.WorldSearch   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
The Republic of Poland, a country in Central Europe, lies between Germany to the west, the Czech Republic and Slovakia to the south, Ukraine and Belarus to the east, and the Baltic Sea, Lithuania and Russia (in the form of the Kaliningrad Oblast exclave) to the north.
Poland enjoys a temperate climate, with cold, cloudy, moderately severe winters with frequent precipitation and mild summers with frequent showers and thunder showers.
Poland's principal ports and harbours are Gdańsk, Gdynia, Kołobrzeg, Szczecin, Świnoujście, Ustka, Warsaw, and Wrocław.
encyclopedia.worldsearch.com /poland.htm   (2577 words)

  
 History of Poznan | Poznan Life
Poznan is one of Poland's oldest cities, and was its capital during the middle of the 10th century.
Though the area of Greater Poland has been inhabited since the Stone Age, the settlement that would become Poznan began at the end of the 8th century AD, when the first stronghold was built on the island of Ostrow Tumski, between the Warta and Cybina rivers.
After the Soviet "liberation" of Poland, the country was incorporated into the Soviet Bloc, though Poznan became once again a Polish city and its German population was expelled, and largely replaced by the expelled Polish population from Lviv and Vilnius and Poland's former eastern territories.
www.poznan-life.com /poznan/history   (1224 words)

  
 Poland - Open Encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
Poland used to be a single-party state and a satellite state of the Soviet Union between 1945 and 1989.
In 13th century Poland was fragmented into several smaller states and ravaged by the Mongol armies of Golden Horde in around 1241.
The citizens of Poland elect a parliament, the National Assembly (Polish Zgromadzenie Narodowe), consisting of 460 members of the Lower House (Sejm) and 100 members of the Senate (Senat), chosen by a proportional vote on a provincial basis to serve four-year terms.
open-encyclopedia.com /Poland   (2352 words)

  
 Greater Poland Voivodship - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Greater Poland Voivodship (in Polish województwo wielkopolskie) is an administrative region or voivodship of western-central Poland It was created on 1 January 1999 out of the former Poznan, Kalisz, Konin, Pila and Leszno voivodships as a result of Local Government Reorganization Act of 1998.
It is second in area and third in population among the country's sixteen voivodships, with 29,826 km² and 3.4 million inhabitants.
Most of the historical region (except some southwestern communities) is included the Greater Poland voivodship (administrative province) created in 1999.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Greater_Poland_Voivodship   (191 words)

  
 Poland Encyclopedia Article, Definition, History, Biography   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
The Republic of Poland is a country located in Central Europe, between Germany to the west, the Czech Republic and Slovakia to the south, Ukraine and Belarus to the east, and the Baltic Sea, Lithuania and Russia (in the form of the Kaliningrad Oblast exclave) to the north.
Poland has a large agricultural sector of private farms, that could be a leading producer of food in the European Union now that Poland is a member.
The principal ports and harbours are: Port of Gdańsk, Port of Gdynia, Port of Szczecin, Port of Swinoujscie, Port of Ustka, Port of Kolobrzeg, Gliwice, Warsaw, Wroclaw.
encyclopedia.localcolorart.com /encyclopedia/Poland   (2901 words)

  
 Silesia - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
In the Middle Ages, Silesia was a Piast province that became a possession of the Bohemian crown under the Holy Roman Empire and passed with that crown to the Austrian Habsburgs in 1526.
During Poland's fragmentation (1138–1320) into duchies ruled by different branches of the Piast dynasty, Silesia was ruled by descendants of the former royal family.
The plebiscite between Germany and Poland, organised by the League of Nations, was held in 1921.
www.bonneylake.us /project/wikipedia/index.php/Silesia   (1947 words)

  
 Pila - Open Encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
Piła is a town in northwestern Poland with 77,000 inhabitants (2001).
Piła is the largest town in the northern part of Greater Poland, at now is capital of a county.
In 1806, together with most of Great Poland, it was recaptured by the Duchy of Warsaw, but in 1815 the Congress of Vienna granted it to Prussia again.
open-encyclopedia.com /Pila   (933 words)

  
 Pila - the free encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
It is situated in the Greater Poland Voivodship (since 1999), previously capital of Piła Voivodship (1975-1998).
Piła is the largest town in the northern part of Greater Poland, and is a county capital.
After the First Partition of Poland in 1772 it was annexed by Prussia.In 1806, together with most of GreatPoland, it was recaptured by the Duchy of Warsaw, but in 1815 the Congress of Viennagranted it to Prussia again.
www.encyclopedia-of-knowledge.com /?t=Pila   (830 words)

  
 Place:Greater Poland Voivodship, Poland - Genealogy
Wielkopolska Voivodship (Polish: województwo wielkopolskie) is an administrative region or voivodship of western-central Poland.
It is second in area and third in population among Poland's sixteen voivodships, with 29,826 km² and 3.4 million inhabitants.
Its principal cities are Poznań, Greater Poland Voivodship, Poland, Leszno, Kalisz, Greater Poland Voivodship, Poland and Gniezno.
werelate.org /wiki/Place:Greater_Poland_Voivodship,_Poland   (192 words)

  
 Poznan - Open Encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
Located by the Warta River, it is one of the oldest Polish cities, an important historical centre and the capital of Greater Poland, the cradle of the Polish state, and Poland's capital in the mid-tenth century during the early Piast dynasty.
Poznań; it is one of the oldest Polish cities, an important historical center and the capital of Greater Poland, the cradle of the Polish state, and Poland's capital in the mid-tenth century during the early Piast dynasty.
Poznań; was the capital of the Greater Poland area when it came under control of Prussia in 1793, its administrative area renamed to South Prussia.
open-encyclopedia.com /Posna   (1863 words)

  
 Greater Poland   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
Greater Poland (sometimes Great Poland; Polish Wielkopolska, German: Grosspolen, Latin: Polonia Maior) is one of the historical regions of Poland.
It is located in western-central Poland, in the valleys of the Warta River and its confluences.
Most of the historical region (except some southwestern communes) is included the Greater Poland voivodship (administrative province) created in 1999.
www.theezine.net /g/greater-poland.html   (137 words)

  
 Gniezno - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
Situated in the Greater Poland Voivodship (since 1999), previously in Poznan Voivodship.
In the next centuries Gniezno evolved as a regional seat of eastern part of Greater Poland, and in 1238 municipal autonomy was granted by the duke.
Gniezno's Roman Catholic archbishop is traditionally the Primate of Poland (Prymas Polski).
www.hartselle.us /project/wikipedia/index.php/Gniezno   (661 words)

  
 Pila article - Pila Poland Greater Poland Voivodship Piła Voivodship 15th century - What-Means.com   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
Piła (former German name: Schneidemühl) is a town in northwestern Poland with 77,000 inhabitants (2001).
Piła is the largest town in the northern part of Greater Poland, at now is headtown of a county.
Founded in 1380 or 1513, Piła was part of Greater Poland.
www.what-means.com /encyclopedia/Pila   (323 words)

  
 All words on Wyrzysk
It lies on the northern edge of Greater Poland Voivodship; in the east it borders gmina Sądki in the Kuyavian-Pomeranian Voivodship.
In the Middle Ages the Noteć became a natural border between the regions of Greater Poland and Pomerania, which long resisted the expansion of the Polish Piast dynasty, German margraves, and since the 13th century also the Teutonic Knights.
Wyrzysk was given to new re-born Poland by Treaty of Versailles, although 53 percent of its population were Germans at that time.
www.allwords.org /wy/wyrzysk.html   (1089 words)

  
 Poznan Information   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
Located by the Warta River, it is one of the oldest Polish cities, an important historical center and the capital of Greater Poland, the cradle of the Polish state, and Poland's capital in the mid-10th centurytenth century during the early Piast dynasty.
It was the capital of Greater Poland, the cradle of the Polish state, and Poland's capital in the mid-10th centurytenth century during the early Piast dynasty.
Following the defeat of Napoleon, Greater Poland was again under Prussian jurisdiction, as the capital of the autonomous Grand Duchy of PoznanGrand Duchy of Poznań;.
www.echostatic.com /index.php?title=Poznan   (1658 words)

  
 poznan   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
Located by the Warta River, it is one of the oldest cities in present-day Poland, an important historical center and the capital of Greater Poland, the cradle of the Polish state, and Poland's capital in the mid-tenth century during the early Piast dynasty.
Poznań's impressive cathedral is the earliest church in the country, containing the tombs of the first Polish rulers: duke Mieszko I and king Boleslaus the Brave.
The city became part of Prussia in 1793, and, with exception from the years 1806-1815 during the Napoleonic Wars, remained German until 1920, when it was ceded to Poland.
www.yourencyclopedia.net /Poznan.html   (1222 words)

  
 The Province of Posen (Poznan)
Greater Poland was taken over by Prussia and initially renamed "Southern Prussia".
The parts of historical Silesia which were incorporated into the Poznan voivodship after 1920 are shown in cyan.
During longer historical periods (but NOT between 1815 and 1938) Poznan was the administrative center for the Eastern Greater Poland (with towns such as Kalisz and Konin), too.
www.polishroots.org /genpoland/pos.htm   (631 words)

  
 Kolo - Unipedia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
Koło is a town on Warta river in central Poland with 23,493 inhabitants (2004).
In 1410 Koło was a gathering place of the Greater Poland nobily, called for a war with Teutonic Order (see Battle of Grunwald).
Till 1793 Koło belonged to the Konin County of the Kalisz Voivodship, and in years 1793-1806 it was occupied by Prussia, but during the Kosciuszko insurrection in 1794 it was temporarily liberated by the insurgents.
www.unipedia.info /Kolo.html   (412 words)

  
 Read about Kalisz Voivodship at WorldVillage Encyclopedia. Research Kalisz Voivodship and learn about Kalisz Voivodship ...   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
Kalisz Voivodship (1) 1975-1998 (Polish: województwo kaliskie) was a unit of administrative division and local government in Poland in years 1975-1998, superseded by
Kalisz Voivodship (2) 14th c.-1793 (Polish: Województwo Kaliskie, Latin: Palatinatus Kalisiensis) was an administrative unit of Poland from 14th century to the partitions of Poland in 1772-1795.
Duchy of Greater Poland (12th-13th centuries) • Poznań; Voivodship and Kalisz Voivodship (until 1793) • South Prussia (until 1806) •;
encyclopedia.worldvillage.com /s/b/Kalisz_Voivodship   (175 words)

  
 Poznan Online - Business oppotunities in Greater Poland voivodship
Greater Poland Voivodeship (also Wielkopolska Province) is a voivodeship, or province, of west-central Poland.
Wielkopolska Province is second in area and third in population among Poland's sixteen voivodeships, with 29,826 km² area and 3.4 million population.
The unemployment rate in the region (as of 30.12.2006 r.) is at the level of 12.1 %, which represents 174.3 thousand registered unemployed.
www.poznan-online.net /70,business_oppotunities_in_greater_poland_voivodship.htm   (295 words)

  
 Voivodships of Poland : Voivodship
A voivodship (in Polish Województwo) is the term for each of the 16 administrative regions (provinces) of Poland.
Today's provinces are largely based on the country's historical regions, whereas those of 1975-1998 were centred on and named for individual cities.
The new units range in area from under 10,000 km² (Opole Voivodship) to over 35,000 km² (Masovian Voivodship), and in population from one million (Lubusz Voivodship) to over five million (Masovian Voivodship).
www.fastload.org /vo/Voivodship.html   (159 words)

  
 Poznan   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
Following the defeat of Napoleon, the Greater Poland area returned to Prussia, ostensibly as an autonomous Grand Duchy of Poznań;, but was reclassified as a Prussian province in 1830.
As an effect of Great Poland Uprising, between the two World Wars the area was part of the restored Poland and the capital of Poznań; Voivodship.
After the war, the area once again was part of the restored Poland, and the city has been capital of the surrounding area through administrative district boundary changes in 1957, 1975 and 1999, currently administrating Greater Poland Voivodship, one of 16 provinces in the country.
www.yotor.com /wiki/en/po/Poznan.htm   (1887 words)

  
 Rawicz - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
Rawicz is a town in central Poland with 21,500 inhabitants (1995).
Situated in the Greater Poland Voivodship (since 1999), previously in Leszno Voivodship (1975-1998).
Rawitsch was founded by Protestant refugees from Silesia during the Thirty Years War.
www.butte-silverbow.us /project/wikipedia/index.php/Rawicz   (142 words)

  
 Place:Wapno, Poland - Genealogy
Wapno is a town in the powiat of Wągrowiec, in the Greater Poland Voivodship, close to the border with Żnin.
Wapno is Polish for gypsum and reflects the large gypsum and lime deposits in the area.
The town is first mentioned in 1299, in an entry in the Codex Diplomaticus Majoris Poloniae, which records the appearance of one Count Adam of Wapno at a trial in the court of one Count Rozal, concerning the rights of the Cistercian monastery in Łękno vis-a-vis the village of Dębogóra.
werelate.org /wiki/Place:Wapno,_Poland   (315 words)

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